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How About Science?

"How About Science?" identifies the best K-12 science education resources the internet has to offer and arranges them into lessons and supporting materials that provide high quality and motivational learning experiences. The general target audience for "How About Science?" is middle school, but because ability levels and needs vary widely, materials found on this website could be useful to students on any grade level.

"How About Science?" identifies the best K-12 science education resources the internet has to offer and arranges them into lessons and supporting materials that provide high quality and motivational learning experiences. The general target audience for "How About Science?" is middle school, but because ability levels and needs vary widely, materials found on this website could be useful to students on any grade level.
Lesson 5, How to Write a Hypothesis
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Lesson 5, How to Write a Hypothesis

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This is lesson 5 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. This lesson discusses the key parts of a hypothesis and how research is necessary in order to make a great one! All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group.
Earth History:  Earth and Space Sciences
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Earth History: Earth and Space Sciences

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This lesson is an introduction to Earth's history, its layers and how it was formed, and is part of a five-lesson series on Earth Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/earth-history. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
Lesson 1, The Scientific Method
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Lesson 1, The Scientific Method

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This is lesson 1 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Your students can watch the video, fill out the handout and discuss the answers. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. This lesson emphasizes that scientific investigations are often sparked by curiosity, which results in a question that can be answered using the scientific method. Introductions to the concepts of observations, inferences and questioning are provided. Please emphasize that the steps of the scientific method are logical, but may vary depending on the nature of the question.
Lesson 7, Types of Variables
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Lesson 7, Types of Variables

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This is lesson 7 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. This lesson examines the roles of controlled, manipulated and responding variables in an investigation. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. This lesson dissects the differences between manipulated, responding and controlled variables with lots of great examples!
Lesson 9, Data Tables
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Lesson 9, Data Tables

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This is lesson 9 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. If you are collecting data, you need to make a data table. This lesson describes how to use variables to make a perfect data table! All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group.
Lesson 6, Variables
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Lesson 6, Variables

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This is lesson 6 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. This lesson introduces the concept of variables and how they may affect your investigation. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group.
Lesson 8, Writing a Procedure
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Lesson 8, Writing a Procedure

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This is lesson 8 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. This lesson explains how to write a clear and concise scientific procedure, emphasizing the use of logic and the incorporation of variables to create an easy to follow step-by-step procedure. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group.
Scientific Practices and the Scientific Method
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Scientific Practices and the Scientific Method

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Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS (Next Generation Science Standards) asks us to teach our students how to plan and carry out investigations, but that's about all the direction we get. So, I've developed a series of eleven videos and accompanying worksheets that support this topic. The videos are light-hearted, example-filled, and will provide your students with a clear means for planning and carrying out a scientific investigation. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials you can preview on the "How About Science?" website at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout completed as a group. Two handouts and keys are provided for each lesson. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch the videos, fill out the handouts, discuss the answers and take the online quiz (Kahout). Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. The emphasis of this unit is on the skills a scientist needs in order to ask good questions, conduct an investigation and communicate results effectively. Students learn how to ask scientific questions, how to write a hypothesis, the importance of variables, how to make data tables and graphs and much, much more!
Eclipses:  Earth and Space Sciences
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Eclipses: Earth and Space Sciences

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This lesson is an introduction to lunar and solar eclipses, and is part of a four-lesson series on Space Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS1 (Earth's Place in the Universe of the NGSS). The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/eclipses. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
Lesson 11, How to Write a Conclusion
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Lesson 11, How to Write a Conclusion

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This is lesson 11 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. This lesson wraps up the entire unit by examining the key components of a good conclusion. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group.
Space Systems:  Seasons, Moon Phases, Eclipses, Solar System
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Space Systems: Seasons, Moon Phases, Eclipses, Solar System

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Lessons in the Space Systems unit are part of a larger unit on Earth and Space Sciences or they can be purchased individually. Space Systems lessons include Seasons, Phases of the Moon, Eclipses, and Solar System. They support MS-ESS1 (Earth's Place in the Universe) of the NGSS. The handouts and included answer keys work together with videos and links found http://www.howaboutscience.com/earth-and-space-science. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete a handout, you may choose to discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required, to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low, even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on your style of teaching and the ability level of your students. For more information about how to get the most out of How About Science?, click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
Lesson 10, How to Make a Graph
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Lesson 10, How to Make a Graph

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This is lesson 10 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. Graphs are important for displaying data. This lesson discusses the key parts of every graph and how to graph the data you collect in your investigations. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group.
Solar System:  Earth and Space Sciences
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Solar System: Earth and Space Sciences

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This lesson is an introduction to the solar system, and is part of a four-lesson series on Space Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS1 (Earth's Place in the Universe of the NGSS). The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/solar-system Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
Lesson 3, Science and Technology
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Lesson 3, Science and Technology

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This is lesson 3 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. This lesson explores the differences between science and technology as well as the roles of scientists and engineers in scientific innovation. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group.
Lesson 4, Scientific Questions
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Lesson 4, Scientific Questions

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This is lesson 4 of an eleven part series on Scientific Practices, which supports Appendix F (Science and Engineering Practices) of the NGSS. This lesson emphasizes that scientific investigations begin with a scientific question and discusses the key components of a good scientific question. All lessons are developed using the BSCS 5E instructional model for teaching and learning (Engage, Explore, Explain, Elaborate, Evaluate) with a 6th (Extend) added for good measure. The handouts are based on video materials found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/scientificpractices. Teachers should have access to a computer and projector or individual internet connected devices depending on your preference or your access to technology. Two handouts and keys are provided. Choose either one, based on the time you have and the ability level of your students. The first handout is more detailed and will take more time to complete. The second handout is shorter and focuses more on main ideas. Just go to the website and click on the appropriate video. Your students can watch and fill out the handout. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group.
Moon Phases:  Earth and Space Sciences
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Moon Phases: Earth and Space Sciences

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This lesson is an introduction to the phases of the moon and what causes them, and is part of a four-lesson series on Space Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS1 (Earth's Place in the Universe of the NGSS). The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/moon-phases. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
Earthquakes:  Earth and Space Sciences
davidhowe1385

Earthquakes: Earth and Space Sciences

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This lesson is an introduction to earthquakes and tsunamis, and is part of a five-lesson series on Earth Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/earthquakes. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
The Water Cycle:  Earth and Space Sciences
davidhowe1385

The Water Cycle: Earth and Space Sciences

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This lesson is an introduction to the water cycle and why it is important, and is part of a five-lesson series on Earth Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/water-cycle. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
Earth and Space Sciences
davidhowe1385

Earth and Space Sciences

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The Earth and Space Sciences Unit contains all of the lessons from the Earth's Systems and Space Systems packets. These lessons include, "Volcanoes, Earthquakes, Water Cycle, Rock Cycle, Earth History, Seasons, Phases of the Moon, Eclipses, and Solar System." They support MS-ESS1 (Earth's Place in the Universe) and MS-ESS2 (Earth's Systems) of the NGSS. The handouts and included answer keys work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/earth-and-space-science. Students may work individually if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handouts filled out as a group. Once students complete a handout, you may choose to discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on your style of teaching and the ability level of your students. For more information about how to get the most out of How About Science?, click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.
Seasons:  Earth and Space Sciences
davidhowe1385

Seasons: Earth and Space Sciences

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This lesson is an introduction to what causes the seasons and is part of a four-lesson series on Space Systems. This lesson supports MS-ESS1 (Earth's Place in the Universe of the NGSS). The handout and included answer key work together with videos and links found at http://www.howaboutscience.com/seasons. Students may work independently if everyone has an internet connected device. If not, the videos can be projected and the handout filled out as a group. Once students complete the handout, discuss the answers and play the Kahout! (click the link on the home page to learn more about Kahouts!) The video materials chosen are based on length, clarity, quality and how closely they align with the national standards. The lesson could be added as an introduction or as further exploration and could be completed as one activity or broken into smaller segments. "How About Science?" materials can be incorporated into your existing unit in various ways depending on the ability level of your students and the availability of technology. Here are a few things to consider. If students are working individually it is helpful, but not required to have headphones or earbuds. If the sound is kept low even a large class of students can be successful without them. Also, because students find the directions very easy to follow, these are perfect for substitute teachers. And, because the videos are online, students with internet connections at home don't have to be at school to complete an assignment. My classes are typically action packed with labs and activities, but these video-based lessons require careful listening and focus. My classes are never quieter, which is kind of nice on occasion. Note! I would suggest doing a trial run before purchasing if you plan to have a large class of students working at individual computers. Internet connection speeds vary which may cause videos to load slowly. You might have everyone log on and try my free resource on TpT (or just go to a lesson and choose something) just to be sure you aren't going to have connection issues. If you do, then you can always project the videos and complete the handouts as a group. For more information about how to get the most out of "How About Science?" click the Teacher's Guide in the menu bar on the website.