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David Whineray's Shop

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I am an experienced Head of History and a member of the Hampshire History Steering Group, with a passion for developing engaging teaching resources. All of my lessons, activities, and assessment materials have been tried and tested. Please don't hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

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I am an experienced Head of History and a member of the Hampshire History Steering Group, with a passion for developing engaging teaching resources. All of my lessons, activities, and assessment materials have been tried and tested. Please don't hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.
New AQA spec Medieval medicine factors 16 mark assessment question - Britain Health and the People
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New AQA spec Medieval medicine factors 16 mark assessment question - Britain Health and the People

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An assessment question lesson which helps students to understand why medicine progressed or stagnated in the Medieval period, as part of the new AQA GCSE Britain: Health and the People unit. The lesson focuses on the factors involved in the development of medicine, and the assessment answers the question: Was religion the main factor in the development of medicine in the Medieval times? [16 marks + 4 SPaG] 1. Give students a copy of the football pitch slide, and the seven footballers to cut up. The activity requires them to decide where on the pitch each 'factor' (War, Science, etc.) should be stuck, and to annotate with examples. 2. Assessment: annotate model answer, and helpful hints, provided for students.
A twenty minute (ish) assembly on the Bristol Bus Boycott, used for Black History Month or MLK Day
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A twenty minute (ish) assembly on the Bristol Bus Boycott, used for Black History Month or MLK Day

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1. I began by showing students images of four historical events (Assassination of JFK, the Beatles scoring their first Number 1 hit, Tottenham Hotspur winning the European Cup Winners Cup, and Martin Luther King delivering his famous I Have a Dream speech) and asked if anyone could connect them; the connection is that they all occurred in 1963. 2. I continued by saying that at the same time as Martin Luther King was delivering his landmark speech to 250,000 people in Washington, in Britain something less well known, but of some importance, was also happening. I gave students some information about the British Empire, Bristol’s location and importance in the Slave Trade, and the arrival of the Empire Windrush. I also added a photograph of a window in which the landlord had specified, ‘no Irish, no blacks, no dogs’, to highlight the racism which was prevalent in the 1960s. 3. I showed students some images and provided some detail about the Bristol Bus Boycott, in which Paul Stevenson and a group of activists fought the Bristol Omnibus Company’s colour bar, and revealed that following city-wide boycott of the busses by Bristolians, on the same day as Martin Luther King delivered his I Have a Dream speech (28 August 1963), the bus company lifted the colour bar. 4. I finished with a short clip which neatly summarises the significance of the Bristol Bus Boycott and asked students to consider why the story is so important, and what they would take away from the assembly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oitqcFdWTP4
Two GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): Civil Rights in the 1950s and 1960
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Two GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): Civil Rights in the 1950s and 1960

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Who had the greater impact on the Civil Rights campaign in America in the 1950s and 1960s? Designed for the GCSE 1-9 AQA course but adaptable for all exam boards, these lessons offer a range of engaging and challenging resources for students to revise core knowledge and develop their exam technique. The package includes: Engaging initial stimulus material (ISM) A detailed card sort Revision notes A thinking activity with note making opportunity Structured essay question help A model answer Lesson P{an: In advance print card sets and large copies of Slide 6 and 7 for each student, and sets of the Civil Rights events cards and the revision notes ISM – discuss the image of integrationists swimming in the motel pool Match the Civil Rights event cards to the nine images on Slide 4 Sort out the Civil Rights event cards and arrange depending on the impact each event had on achieving Civil Rights (Slide 6). Students could create a copy of Slide 6 for revision notes Use the printed revision notes to complete the exam question structure grid on Slide 7. Use highlighters to assign a colour to each paragraph and find appropriate evidence in the revision notes handout. Complete exam practice. A quality model answer is included.
How were people at home affected by WWI? A Home Front enquiry
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How were people at home affected by WWI? A Home Front enquiry

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A lesson designed to offer students an overview of the key events of the First World War, and their effects on the Home Front, using The Brown Family's Four War Christmases. 1. Students identify the changes that take place year-on-year 2. Students use the event cards to explain why the changes to the Browns' life have occurred 3. Students speculate what Christmas 1918 might have looked like, and draw a dinner table scene based on their knowledge of the war's events.
Three GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): Elizabethan England
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Three GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): Elizabethan England

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Three GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): Elizabethan England Designed for the GCSE 1-9 AQA course but adaptable for all exam boards, these three revision lessons for the GCSE Elizabethan topic cover include core knowledge revision, video clip links, and exam practice worksheets, with printable resources for students to use. Elizabeth and her government Life in Elizabethan times Trouble at home and abroad
What were the Roaring Twenties?
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What were the Roaring Twenties?

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A market place activity in which students become experts in an aspect of the USA 1920s, create a resource, and deliver their findings to their classmates as part of a carousel activity. A knowledge test is included to check students' learning. 1. Slow reveal of Entertainment by Thomas Hart Benson, which generates interest in the subject of the Roaring Twenties 2. Assign pairs of students a topic (Jazz, cars, cinema etc.) in which to become an expert; depending on how many are in your class, give more than one pair the same topic 3. Students create a resource about their topic. It must contain no more than ten words 4. Students carousel around the classroom and teach each other, completing the worksheet. Those that move around then teach their partner about all of the aspects of the Roaring Twenties 5. Plenary: Assess Thomas Hart Benson's painting for accuracy. Anything he missed? 6. Knowledge test
A life-after-levels Year 7 end-of-year-exam, based on AQA 2016 GCSE requirements (Black Death)
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A life-after-levels Year 7 end-of-year-exam, based on AQA 2016 GCSE requirements (Black Death)

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My school recently demanded that we give all students a thorough end-of-year examination each year, so I decided to develop a new Year 7 exam (based on the Black Death) which provides an opportunity to test students' core historical skills and give them a flavour of the challenges to come! See my other uploads for a corresponding Baseline Test and Year 8 exam. This is based on the AQA style, which is the GCSE syllabus that our Year 7 students will eventually follow, and has four questions (below). I have also included sources, a mark scheme, model answers, and a conversion chart for 'old' National Curriculum levels in case your school is still using them. 1. What does Source A tell you about life in the Medieval period? [2 marks] 2. What are the differences between Source A and Source B? [4 marks] 3. Why are Source A and Source B different? [6 marks] 4. “The Black Death was a complete disaster.” How far do you agree? Use the historical sources and your knowledge in your answer [8 marks] Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar [4 marks] [24 marks]
How did the Nazis control Germany? A three-lesson enquiry with GCSE question/markscheme/answers
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How did the Nazis control Germany? A three-lesson enquiry with GCSE question/markscheme/answers

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A three-lesson pack which encourages GCSE students to make links between the various methods of control employed by the Nazis in the 1930s, which helps students to plan and write an essay. In this case, they tackle an OCR Modern World 10-mark question, but this could easily be adapted for your exam board. I have provided an engaging starter, evidence, a Venn diagram and an essay planning sheet, as well as model answers and a mark scheme. Lesson 1 1. Mystery images: How many can students remember if they only get a short time to view them? What connects the images? All are ways in which the Nazis controlled the German people 2. Match sources from the evidence pack (separate PowerPoint) to the images on Slide 2, to make students study the sources carefully 3. Print Slide 4 so that students can annotate the images with details from the evidence pack 4. Plenary: find links between the images on Slide 2, and decide which is the most important method of control Lesson 2 Slide 5: print writing frame for students and enable them plan an essay answer, using evidence from the source pack to build paragraphs Lesson 3 Students write essay, and use the model answers of varying quality to help them better their own, once marked. Alternatively, students could assess the model answers before writing their own version.
A new life-after-levels Year 7 Baseline History test, based on the AQA 2016 GCSE requirements
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A new life-after-levels Year 7 Baseline History test, based on the AQA 2016 GCSE requirements

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With the abolition of KS3 levels it became clear that we need to give our students a more rigorous Baseline Test when they arrive at the start of Year 7. In addition, my school is increasingly demanding that we give all students a thorough end-of-year examination each year, so I decided to develop a new Baseline Test (based on the Medieval life topic) which provides an opportunity to test students' core historical skills and give them a flavour of the challenges to come! This is based on the AQA style, which is the GCSE syllabus that our Year 7 students will eventually follow, and has four questions (below). I have also included sources, a mark scheme, model answers, and a conversion chart for 'old' National Curriculum levels in case your school is still using them. 1. What does Source A tell you about life in the Medieval period? [2 marks] 2. What are the differences between Source A and Source B? [4 marks] 3. Why are Source A and Source B different? [6 marks] 4. “Life in the medieval period (1066-1500) was mucky and miserable.” How far do you agree? Use the historical sources and your knowledge in your answer [8 marks] Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar [4 marks] [24 marks]
What was Europe like in 1500? An introduction to Tudor/Elizabethan England for GCSE
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What was Europe like in 1500? An introduction to Tudor/Elizabethan England for GCSE

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Designed to set the context to Tudor/Elizabethan England for GCSE students 1. Print copies of Slide 13 for each student, on A3, and colour copies of Slides 5-12. 2. Slide 2: introductory images – can students work out what each image is, or the connection between them? 3. Slide 3: key question and aims. Slides 4-12: market place activity. In pairs, students become experts in one aspect of Europe in 1500s and create a teaching resource with just 20 words. Give them 20 minutes to complete this. 4. Once resources have been created, students carousel round and complete their map of Europe, colour coding their notes according to whether they describe the economy, religion or politics. As students are working, display Slide 2 so they can work out what each image represents – this can be fed back at the end of the lesson. 5. Once students have visited each station, they then return and share their notes with the person who remained in place as a teacher, such that everyone completes a map 6. Knowledge test to consolidate learning.
Two GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): League of Nations
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Two GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): League of Nations

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Designed for the GCSE 1-9 AQA course but adaptable for all exam boards, these lessons offer a range of engaging and challenging resources for students to revise core knowledge and develop their exam technique. The package includes: A knowledge quiz with answers A 16-question revision challenge A revision pyramid activity A cartoon analysis activity An essay-style exam practice worksheet with structured help
How should Oliver Cromwell be remembered? A two-lesson interpretations enquiry for KS3
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How should Oliver Cromwell be remembered? A two-lesson interpretations enquiry for KS3

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Aims: 1. Identify key events of Cromwell’s life 2. Explain why different people have had different opinions of Cromwell 3. Create scenes from Cromwell’s life from different points of view Lesson 1 1. Slides 2-3: Introduce two contrasting views of Cromwell to establish the debate and controversy (statue and Pogues' song - lyrics provided) 2. Print copies of Slide 5 and the card sort for students to use. 3. Sort Cromwell's key life events into a living graph, positive and negative, according to different people (Charles II, Prime Minister, film maker, students themselves, to establish different interpretations) 4. Students complete personal copy of Cromwell's living graph, to understand the main events of his life for Lesson 2. Lesson 2 1. Print Slide 8 for students. They work in teams to produce three tableau or freeze-frames from the point of view of a film maker, a school textbook writer, and the writer of an Irish nationalist magazine in 1900. They must decide how to set the scene to get across each person's point of view of Cromwell, including how he stands, the key events they might focus on, background etc. (see Slide 8).