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David Whineray's Shop

I am an experienced Head of History and a member of the Hampshire History Steering Group, with a passion for developing engaging teaching resources. All of my lessons, activities, and assessment materials have been tried and tested. Please don't hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

I am an experienced Head of History and a member of the Hampshire History Steering Group, with a passion for developing engaging teaching resources. All of my lessons, activities, and assessment materials have been tried and tested. Please don't hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.
New AQA spec Medieval medicine factors 16 mark assessment question - Britain Health and the People

New AQA spec Medieval medicine factors 16 mark assessment question - Britain Health and the People

An assessment question lesson which helps students to understand why medicine progressed or stagnated in the Medieval period, as part of the new AQA GCSE Britain: Health and the People unit. The lesson focuses on the factors involved in the development of medicine, and the assessment answers the question: Was religion the main factor in the development of medicine in the Medieval times? [16 marks + 4 SPaG] 1. Give students a copy of the football pitch slide, and the seven footballers to cut up. The activity requires them to decide where on the pitch each 'factor' (War, Science, etc.) should be stuck, and to annotate with examples. 2. Assessment: annotate model answer, and helpful hints, provided for students.
davidwhineray
A new life-after-levels Year 7 Baseline History test, based on the AQA 2016 GCSE requirements

A new life-after-levels Year 7 Baseline History test, based on the AQA 2016 GCSE requirements

With the abolition of KS3 levels it became clear that we need to give our students a more rigorous Baseline Test when they arrive at the start of Year 7. In addition, my school is increasingly demanding that we give all students a thorough end-of-year examination each year, so I decided to develop a new Baseline Test (based on the Medieval life topic) which provides an opportunity to test students' core historical skills and give them a flavour of the challenges to come! This is based on the AQA style, which is the GCSE syllabus that our Year 7 students will eventually follow, and has four questions (below). I have also included sources, a mark scheme, model answers, and a conversion chart for 'old' National Curriculum levels in case your school is still using them. 1. What does Source A tell you about life in the Medieval period? [2 marks] 2. What are the differences between Source A and Source B? [4 marks] 3. Why are Source A and Source B different? [6 marks] 4. “Life in the medieval period (1066-1500) was mucky and miserable.” How far do you agree? Use the historical sources and your knowledge in your answer [8 marks] Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar [4 marks] [24 marks]
davidwhineray
GCSE Cold War resource bundle

GCSE Cold War resource bundle

Re-invigorate your teaching of the Cold War with this comprehensive bundle, which includes four fully-resourced lessons, five knowledge tests, with answers, and a Cold War revision carousel lesson. Ideal for busy trainees or NQTs
davidwhineray
A new life-after-levels Year 7 Baseline History test, based on the AQA 2016 GCSE requirements

A new life-after-levels Year 7 Baseline History test, based on the AQA 2016 GCSE requirements

With the abolition of KS3 levels it became clear that we need to give our students a more rigorous Baseline Test when they arrive at the start of Year 7. In addition, my school is increasingly demanding that we give all students a thorough end-of-year examination each year, so I decided to develop a new Baseline Test (based on the Medieval life topic) which provides an opportunity to test students' core historical skills and give them a flavour of the challenges to come! This is based on the AQA style, which is the GCSE syllabus that our Year 7 students will eventually follow, and has four questions (below). I have also included sources, a mark scheme, model answers, and a conversion chart for 'old' National Curriculum levels in case your school is still using them. 1. What does Source A tell you about life in the Medieval period? [2 marks] 2. What are the differences between Source A and Source B? [4 marks] 3. Why are Source A and Source B different? [6 marks] 4. “Life in the medieval period (1066-1500) was mucky and miserable.” How far do you agree? Use the historical sources and your knowledge in your answer [8 marks] Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar [4 marks] [24 marks]
davidwhineray
How similar are we to the Edwardians?

How similar are we to the Edwardians?

An introduction to Edwardian Britain for the Britain 1906-18 GCSE unit, which uses extracts from Andrew Marr's book/TV series 'The Making of Modern Britain' to compare and contrast Edwardian and modern Britain. 1. Use the image of 1890s Britain to set the scene, generating comparisons with today's Britain and establishing key questions/areas of enquiry (transport, homes, etc.) 2. Use the photograph of the building (Slide 5) to further establish similarities and differences between Edwardian Britain and modern Britain. Add details to decision line sheet (see Word doc.) 3. Print and display the Andrew Marr sources for students to further enquire into similarities and differences. Display Slide 6 to focus their discussions 4. Decision line plenary, and hypothesis testing if a written plenary is more suitable.
davidwhineray
Who were the suffragists and the suffragettes?

Who were the suffragists and the suffragettes?

An introduction to the tactics of the suffragists and suffragettes, with source analysis and a GCSE-style question. Slide 2: give students scrap paper and ask them to draw a terrorist. A stereotype will likely emerge. Explore it, and discuss whether you, as their teacher would have drawn the same thing if asked to complete this task as child Slides 3 and 4: secret picture with the Shrieking Sister cartoon Give students Layers of Inference sheet to begin unlocking the cartoon Slide 5: aims and objectives Give students detailed history of Suffragists/Suffragettes and get them to cross out the silly words. This will make them read it closely. Add contextual knowledge to Layers of Inference sheet Slide 6: Complete analysis of cartoon in written paragraph Slide 7: would they now draw a terrorist differently, given that the suffragettes were certainly seen as terrorists by many in Edwardian Britain, but are unlikely to be viewed as such in the twenty-first century?
davidwhineray
Great Depression/New Deal lesson and resource bundle

Great Depression/New Deal lesson and resource bundle

Re-invigorate your teaching of the Great Depression and the New Deal with this comprehensive bundle, which includes six fully-resourced lessons, three knowledge tests, with answers, and a USA 1920s-30s revision carousel lesson. Ideal for busy trainees or NQTs
davidwhineray
New AQA spec Medieval medicine factors 16 mark assessment question - Britain Health and the People

New AQA spec Medieval medicine factors 16 mark assessment question - Britain Health and the People

An assessment question lesson which helps students to understand why medicine progressed or stagnated in the Medieval period, as part of the new AQA GCSE Britain: Health and the People unit. The lesson focuses on the factors involved in the development of medicine, and the assessment answers the question: Was religion the main factor in the development of medicine in the Medieval times? [16 marks + 4 SPaG] 1. Give students a copy of the football pitch slide, and the seven footballers to cut up. The activity requires them to decide where on the pitch each 'factor' (War, Science, etc.) should be stuck, and to annotate with examples. 2. Assessment: annotate model answer, and helpful hints, provided for students.
davidwhineray
What were the Roaring Twenties?

What were the Roaring Twenties?

A market place activity in which students become experts in an aspect of the USA 1920s, create a resource, and deliver their findings to their classmates as part of a carousel activity. A knowledge test is included to check students' learning. 1. Slow reveal of Entertainment by Thomas Hart Benson, which generates interest in the subject of the Roaring Twenties 2. Assign pairs of students a topic (Jazz, cars, cinema etc.) in which to become an expert; depending on how many are in your class, give more than one pair the same topic 3. Students create a resource about their topic. It must contain no more than ten words 4. Students carousel around the classroom and teach each other, completing the worksheet. Those that move around then teach their partner about all of the aspects of the Roaring Twenties 5. Plenary: Assess Thomas Hart Benson's painting for accuracy. Anything he missed? 6. Knowledge test
davidwhineray
When were women most likely to get the vote, 1900-1914?

When were women most likely to get the vote, 1900-1914?

A chronology of the key events in the campaign for votes for women, with activities which promote deep thinking, discussion and justification, with a final written task. Students are asked to assess the effectiveness of both the suffragists and the suffragettes, before deciding which group had the most impact. 1. What connects the mystery images on Slide 1? They are all related to Votes for Women campaign Top row L-R: smashing windows, 1913 Derby, chaining themselves to railings Middle row L-R: blowing up Lloyd George's house, hunger strikes, arson Bottom row L-R: force feeding, women's war work (canaries), traditional views on women's 'sphere'. 2. Match information cards to the images on Slide 2 in order to encourages closer reading 3. Arrange information cards chronologically, and move up or down depending on how likely each event was to win women the vote. 4. Complete version on paper (Slide 7) 5. Check learning with cake sharing activity 6. Written plenary
davidwhineray
How were people at home affected by WWI? A Home Front enquiry

How were people at home affected by WWI? A Home Front enquiry

A lesson designed to offer students an overview of the key events of the First World War, and their effects on the Home Front, using The Brown Family's Four War Christmases. 1. Students identify the changes that take place year-on-year 2. Students use the event cards to explain why the changes to the Browns' life have occurred 3. Students speculate what Christmas 1918 might have looked like, and draw a dinner table scene based on their knowledge of the war's events.
davidwhineray
Cuban Missile Crisis timeline activity - ideal for first teaching or revision

Cuban Missile Crisis timeline activity - ideal for first teaching or revision

Help your students remember the detailed events of the Cuban Missile Crisis with this engaging activity, ideal for first teaching or revision. 1. Give students copies of the images on the PowerPoint and a highlighter pen. If it's being done as revision, ask students to link the images to the events of the Cuban Missile Crisis. 2. Read through extended written info on the Cuban Missile Crisis and highlight anything that links to the pictures. 3. When students have read through the sheet thoroughly, get them to make notes around the images in order to tell the story of the Cuban Missile Crisis.
davidwhineray
A life-after-levels Year 7 end-of-year-exam, based on AQA 2016 GCSE requirements (Black Death)

A life-after-levels Year 7 end-of-year-exam, based on AQA 2016 GCSE requirements (Black Death)

My school recently demanded that we give all students a thorough end-of-year examination each year, so I decided to develop a new Year 7 exam (based on the Black Death) which provides an opportunity to test students' core historical skills and give them a flavour of the challenges to come! See my other uploads for a corresponding Baseline Test and Year 8 exam. This is based on the AQA style, which is the GCSE syllabus that our Year 7 students will eventually follow, and has four questions (below). I have also included sources, a mark scheme, model answers, and a conversion chart for 'old' National Curriculum levels in case your school is still using them. 1. What does Source A tell you about life in the Medieval period? [2 marks] 2. What are the differences between Source A and Source B? [4 marks] 3. Why are Source A and Source B different? [6 marks] 4. “The Black Death was a complete disaster.” How far do you agree? Use the historical sources and your knowledge in your answer [8 marks] Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar [4 marks] [24 marks]
davidwhineray
GCSE revision: What can historical cartoons and sources teach us about America in the 1920s?

GCSE revision: What can historical cartoons and sources teach us about America in the 1920s?

A consolidation or revision lesson on 1920s America for GCSE students, in which they apply knowledge to historical cartoons and tackle a GCSE style message question. Based on the OCR Modern World syllabus, this could easily be adapted for other exam boards. 1. How many points can students get in 4 minutes? (You could repeat this activity at the end of the lesson to check learning) 2. Eight cartoons can be placed around the room in a gallery, and students can fill in the accompanying Word documents 3. Choose a cartoon and write a GCSE-standard answer (help provided)
davidwhineray
How did America react to the Iron Curtain? A two lesson enquiry with exam practice question

How did America react to the Iron Curtain? A two lesson enquiry with exam practice question

Lesson 1 Marketplace activity: Students become experts in one of the four main areas (Greece, Czechoslovakia, Marshall Plan, Truman Doctrine - see info sheets) and design a teaching resource with no more than ten words. They then teach each other, in a carousel fashion, before trying the knowledge test (answers provided). Lesson 2 GCSE cartoon analysis (OCR-style, but it's adaptable to other exam boards). Use the layers of inference sheet and the knowledge from Lesson 1 to unlock the cartoon, before answering a GCSE-style queston.
davidwhineray
Why did people oppose the New Deal? A GCSE cartoon analysis activity

Why did people oppose the New Deal? A GCSE cartoon analysis activity

A lesson for GCSE students on opposition to the New Deal. 1. Read through the New Deal information (Word document) and cross out silly words, so that the piece of writing makes perfect sense. 2. Consolidate knowledge by trying to improve the statements on Slide 1. Some are totally false, others just require extra information. 3. In groups, analyse and annotate copies of the four New Deal-related cartoons. Key words definitions are provided. Share ideas with class.
davidwhineray