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I am an experienced Head of History and a member of the Hampshire History Steering Group, with a passion for developing engaging teaching resources. All of my lessons, activities, and assessment materials have been tried and tested. Please don't hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.

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I am an experienced Head of History and a member of the Hampshire History Steering Group, with a passion for developing engaging teaching resources. All of my lessons, activities, and assessment materials have been tried and tested. Please don't hesitate to get in touch if you have any questions.
Why did Franklin D Roosevelt win the 1932 Presidential election? A two-lesson enquiry with question
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Why did Franklin D Roosevelt win the 1932 Presidential election? A two-lesson enquiry with question

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This two-lesson enquiry asks students to investigate why FDR won the 1932 election. It includes a range of sources and support for writing an OCR ten-mark essay question (which can easily be adapted for other examination specifications). Lesson 1: 1. Analysis of New Driver cartoon to establish the theme of the lessons 2. Print Slide 4 for students to add notes and ideas to, and the resources PowerPoint; students should decide why voters might choose FDR or Hoover, using the sources as evidence Lesson 2: 1. Recap last lesson's learning by deciding which of the quotations should be attributed to Hoover or FDR 2. Print large copies of Slide 20, an essay preparation sheet. This is designed to help students plan an essay on the theme of why FDR won the election. Use the sources for information. 3. Write essay as homework/third lesson assessment task
Three GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): Elizabethan England
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Three GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): Elizabethan England

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Three GCSE 1-9 revision lessons with exam technique practice (AQA): Elizabethan England Designed for the GCSE 1-9 AQA course but adaptable for all exam boards, these three revision lessons for the GCSE Elizabethan topic cover include core knowledge revision, video clip links, and exam practice worksheets, with printable resources for students to use. Elizabeth and her government Life in Elizabethan times Trouble at home and abroad
What can The Simpsons teach us about Prohibition?
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What can The Simpsons teach us about Prohibition?

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NB: This lesson requires a copy of The Simpsons episode 'Homer vs. the Eighteenth Amendment', and some GCSE textbooks which include the history of prohibition. Use the Simpsons to bring alive the history of prohibition, and put the writers' interpretation to the test.
New AQA spec Medieval medicine factors 16 mark assessment question - Britain Health and the People
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New AQA spec Medieval medicine factors 16 mark assessment question - Britain Health and the People

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An assessment question lesson which helps students to understand why medicine progressed or stagnated in the Medieval period, as part of the new AQA GCSE Britain: Health and the People unit. The lesson focuses on the factors involved in the development of medicine, and the assessment answers the question: Was religion the main factor in the development of medicine in the Medieval times? [16 marks + 4 SPaG] 1. Give students a copy of the football pitch slide, and the seven footballers to cut up. The activity requires them to decide where on the pitch each 'factor' (War, Science, etc.) should be stuck, and to annotate with examples. 2. Assessment: annotate model answer, and helpful hints, provided for students.
A twenty minute (ish) assembly on the Bristol Bus Boycott, used for Black History Month or MLK Day
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A twenty minute (ish) assembly on the Bristol Bus Boycott, used for Black History Month or MLK Day

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1. I began by showing students images of four historical events (Assassination of JFK, the Beatles scoring their first Number 1 hit, Tottenham Hotspur winning the European Cup Winners Cup, and Martin Luther King delivering his famous I Have a Dream speech) and asked if anyone could connect them; the connection is that they all occurred in 1963. 2. I continued by saying that at the same time as Martin Luther King was delivering his landmark speech to 250,000 people in Washington, in Britain something less well known, but of some importance, was also happening. I gave students some information about the British Empire, Bristol’s location and importance in the Slave Trade, and the arrival of the Empire Windrush. I also added a photograph of a window in which the landlord had specified, ‘no Irish, no blacks, no dogs’, to highlight the racism which was prevalent in the 1960s. 3. I showed students some images and provided some detail about the Bristol Bus Boycott, in which Paul Stevenson and a group of activists fought the Bristol Omnibus Company’s colour bar, and revealed that following city-wide boycott of the busses by Bristolians, on the same day as Martin Luther King delivered his I Have a Dream speech (28 August 1963), the bus company lifted the colour bar. 4. I finished with a short clip which neatly summarises the significance of the Bristol Bus Boycott and asked students to consider why the story is so important, and what they would take away from the assembly: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oitqcFdWTP4
What were the Roaring Twenties?
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What were the Roaring Twenties?

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A market place activity in which students become experts in an aspect of the USA 1920s, create a resource, and deliver their findings to their classmates as part of a carousel activity. A knowledge test is included to check students' learning. 1. Slow reveal of Entertainment by Thomas Hart Benson, which generates interest in the subject of the Roaring Twenties 2. Assign pairs of students a topic (Jazz, cars, cinema etc.) in which to become an expert; depending on how many are in your class, give more than one pair the same topic 3. Students create a resource about their topic. It must contain no more than ten words 4. Students carousel around the classroom and teach each other, completing the worksheet. Those that move around then teach their partner about all of the aspects of the Roaring Twenties 5. Plenary: Assess Thomas Hart Benson's painting for accuracy. Anything he missed? 6. Knowledge test
A life-after-levels Year 7 end-of-year-exam, based on AQA 2016 GCSE requirements (Black Death)
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A life-after-levels Year 7 end-of-year-exam, based on AQA 2016 GCSE requirements (Black Death)

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My school recently demanded that we give all students a thorough end-of-year examination each year, so I decided to develop a new Year 7 exam (based on the Black Death) which provides an opportunity to test students' core historical skills and give them a flavour of the challenges to come! See my other uploads for a corresponding Baseline Test and Year 8 exam. This is based on the AQA style, which is the GCSE syllabus that our Year 7 students will eventually follow, and has four questions (below). I have also included sources, a mark scheme, model answers, and a conversion chart for 'old' National Curriculum levels in case your school is still using them. 1. What does Source A tell you about life in the Medieval period? [2 marks] 2. What are the differences between Source A and Source B? [4 marks] 3. Why are Source A and Source B different? [6 marks] 4. “The Black Death was a complete disaster.” How far do you agree? Use the historical sources and your knowledge in your answer [8 marks] Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar [4 marks] [24 marks]
A life-after-levels Year 8 end-of-year-exam, based on AQA 2016 GCSE requirements (Black Peoples)
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A life-after-levels Year 8 end-of-year-exam, based on AQA 2016 GCSE requirements (Black Peoples)

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My school recently demanded that we give all students a thorough end-of-year examination each year, so I decided to develop a new Year 8 exam (based on the popular Black Peoples of the Americas KS3 topic) which provides an opportunity to test students' core historical skills and give them a flavour of the challenges to come! See my other uploads for a corresponding Baseline Test and Year 7 exam. This is based on the AQA style, which is the GCSE syllabus that our Year 8 students will eventually follow, and has four questions (below). I have also included sources, a mark scheme, model answers, and a conversion chart for 'old' National Curriculum levels in case your school is still using them. 1. What does Source B tell you about life for Black Americans? [2 marks] 2. What are the differences between Source B and Source D? [4 marks] 3. Why are Source B and Source D different? [6 marks] 4. “Life has improved for Black Americans since the days of slavery.” How far do you agree? Use the historical sources and your knowledge in your answer [8 marks] [24 marks]
What were the strengths and weaknesses of the League of Nations?
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What were the strengths and weaknesses of the League of Nations?

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An enquiry into the strengths and weaknesses of the League of Nations for the new GCSE Conflict and Tension 1918-39. 1. Analyse the three isolationism cartoons to recall learning about American isolationism and why they didn't join the League of Nations 2. Find the errors sheet - students cross out silly words so that the League of Nations information makes sense. Check understanding with Slide 5 (if these are the answers...) 3. Use this to complete the grid about the strengths and weaknesses of the League 4. Plenary: Move around the room activity, where students ask each other for answers, to consolidate learning (this can also be used at the start of next lesson).
How were people at home affected by WWI? A Home Front enquiry
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How were people at home affected by WWI? A Home Front enquiry

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A lesson designed to offer students an overview of the key events of the First World War, and their effects on the Home Front, using The Brown Family's Four War Christmases. 1. Students identify the changes that take place year-on-year 2. Students use the event cards to explain why the changes to the Browns' life have occurred 3. Students speculate what Christmas 1918 might have looked like, and draw a dinner table scene based on their knowledge of the war's events.
Who suffered the most in the Great Depression?
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Who suffered the most in the Great Depression?

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An activity which works well for first teaching or revision, this enquiry gets students to consider the social effects of the Great Depression. Using images and personal stories, students think deeply and justify their decisions. 1. Slide 2: what connects photos? All have won awards. Which has been praised as the slide suggests? Dorothea Lange’s Migrant Mother photo (Slide 3) 2. Print copies of Slide 4 and ask students to match Depression stories (see PDF) with images; this encourages deeper reading. 3. Slide 6: Categorise cards – thinking and prioritising 4. Slide 7: true or false activity tests students’ knowledge of the problems of the Depression 5. Slide 8/10 complete decision line about the effects of the Depression on different groups. Print Slide 10 for students to complete 6. Slide 9 (Plenary): students discuss which single photo best sums up the effects of the Great Depression on the USA
A new life-after-levels Year 7 Baseline History test, based on the AQA 2016 GCSE requirements
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A new life-after-levels Year 7 Baseline History test, based on the AQA 2016 GCSE requirements

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With the abolition of KS3 levels it became clear that we need to give our students a more rigorous Baseline Test when they arrive at the start of Year 7. In addition, my school is increasingly demanding that we give all students a thorough end-of-year examination each year, so I decided to develop a new Baseline Test (based on the Medieval life topic) which provides an opportunity to test students' core historical skills and give them a flavour of the challenges to come! This is based on the AQA style, which is the GCSE syllabus that our Year 7 students will eventually follow, and has four questions (below). I have also included sources, a mark scheme, model answers, and a conversion chart for 'old' National Curriculum levels in case your school is still using them. 1. What does Source A tell you about life in the Medieval period? [2 marks] 2. What are the differences between Source A and Source B? [4 marks] 3. Why are Source A and Source B different? [6 marks] 4. “Life in the medieval period (1066-1500) was mucky and miserable.” How far do you agree? Use the historical sources and your knowledge in your answer [8 marks] Spelling, Punctuation and Grammar [4 marks] [24 marks]
How similar are we to the Edwardians?
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How similar are we to the Edwardians?

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An introduction to Edwardian Britain for the Britain 1906-18 GCSE unit, which uses extracts from Andrew Marr's book/TV series 'The Making of Modern Britain' to compare and contrast Edwardian and modern Britain. 1. Use the image of 1890s Britain to set the scene, generating comparisons with today's Britain and establishing key questions/areas of enquiry (transport, homes, etc.) 2. Use the photograph of the building (Slide 5) to further establish similarities and differences between Edwardian Britain and modern Britain. Add details to decision line sheet (see Word doc.) 3. Print and display the Andrew Marr sources for students to further enquire into similarities and differences. Display Slide 6 to focus their discussions 4. Decision line plenary, and hypothesis testing if a written plenary is more suitable.