The presentation of relationships in 'Climbing My Grandfather', by Andrew Waterhouse (AQA anthology)

The presentation of relationships in 'Climbing My Grandfather', by Andrew Waterhouse (AQA anthology)

The focus of the lesson is on exploring how Andrew Waterhouse uses imagery to help shape our understanding of the relationship presented to us in the poem. In terms of outcomes, the aim is for students to produce two relatively short, but high-quality, written responses (containing appropriately used poetic terminology, reporting and analysing verbs, and conjunctions) - please see slides 13, 14 and 15. At the beginning of the lesson, students should read and discuss the poem; there's a set of structured tasks on the worksheet. Following that, I've included a copy of the poem across five slides for teacher-lead annotation.
douglaswise
Jekyll and Hyde: Resources for Chapters 1 - 10

Jekyll and Hyde: Resources for Chapters 1 - 10

Resources for Chapters 1 - 10 of The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde... Chapter 1: The historical context of the novel Chapter 2: The presentation of Edward Hyde Chapter 3: The presentation of Henry Jekyll Chapter 4: Contrasts between Edward Hyde and Sir Danvers Carew Chapter 5: Henry Jekyll's state of mind Chapter 6: The presentation of Dr Lanyon Chapter 7: The presentation of Henry Jekyll as a troubled character Chapter 8 (Part 1): The creation of a sense of fear and foreboding Chapter 8 (Part 2): The motif of the door Chapter 9: Henry Jekyll's persuasion of Dr Lanyon Chapter 10: (Part 1): The defence of Jekyll's actions Chapter 10 (Part 2): Jekyll's struggles Chapter 10 (Part 3): Jekyll's attempts to shift the blame onto Hyde.
douglaswise
The presentation of relationships in 'Winter Swans' by Owen Sheers (AQA anthology)

The presentation of relationships in 'Winter Swans' by Owen Sheers (AQA anthology)

This is a single lesson on the presentation of relationships in 'Winter Swans' by Owen Sheers. Firstly, students should retrieve relevant quotations linked to the images on the first slide. Following that, there's a blank copy of the poem to annotate on the attached worksheet. Finally, students should aim to produce two relatively short, but high-quality, written responses (containing appropriately used poetic terminology, reporting and analysing verbs, and conjunctions) - please see slides 14, 15 and 16.
douglaswise
The presentation of the speaker's emotions in 'When We Two Parted', by Lord Byron (AQA)

The presentation of the speaker's emotions in 'When We Two Parted', by Lord Byron (AQA)

The objective of the lesson is for students to develop their inference skills by making judgements on the way in which the speaker's emotions are presented in the poem. Students should pick the most convincing points from the first worksheet (or put forward their own) and then use them for the basis of a formal written response. A copy of the poem has been included on the presentation for group annotation.
douglaswise
The presentation of relationships in 'Letters from Yorkshire', by Maura Dooley (AQA anthology)

The presentation of relationships in 'Letters from Yorkshire', by Maura Dooley (AQA anthology)

The focus of the lesson is on exploring how Maura Dooley uses imagery to help shape our understanding of the relationship presented to us in the poem. In terms of outcomes, the aim is for students to produce two relatively short, but high-quality, written responses (containing appropriately used poetic terminology, reporting and analysing verbs, and conjunctions) - please see slides 4, 13 and 14. At the beginning of the lesson, students should read and discuss the poem; there's a set of structured tasks on the worksheet. Following that, I've included a copy of the poem across five slides for teacher-lead annotation. Finally, slides 15 - 19 are optional. Use them if you want to, but delete them if you don't!
douglaswise
'Spies' lesson from the GCSE AQA English Language Paper 1 anthology

'Spies' lesson from the GCSE AQA English Language Paper 1 anthology

The focus of the lesson is on exploring how Michael Frayn uses language to shape meaning in the extract from 'Spies'. In terms of outcomes, the aim is for students to produce four relatively short, but high-quality, written responses (containing appropriately used reporting and analysing verbs, and conjunctions) - please see slide 2. At the beginning of the lesson, students should read and discuss the extract; there's a simple retrieval task on slide 4 that can support this. Slide 5 is there just to contextualise the task that will follow: it's a screenshot taken from the specimen assessment paper released by AQA (question 2 of the exam will require students to analyse language). For the main part of the lesson, students should discuss the questions on slide 6 and make notes on the worksheet; they should then craft a short written response on the question, using the key words at the bottom of the slide. Follow the same pattern, for slides 7 - 9. Finally, slides 10 - 13 are there just there for reference. Use them if you want to, but delete them if you don't!
douglaswise
'Bring up the Bodies' lesson from the GCSE AQA English Language Paper 1 anthology

'Bring up the Bodies' lesson from the GCSE AQA English Language Paper 1 anthology

The focus of the lesson is on exploring how Hilary Mantel uses language to shape meaning in the extract from 'Bring up the Bodies'. In terms of outcomes, the aim is for students to produce three relatively short, but high-quality, written responses (containing appropriately used reporting and analysing verbs, conjunctions, and word-level terminology) - please see slide 2. At the beginning of the lesson, students should read and discuss the extract; there's a simple retrieval task on slide 4 that can support this. Students should then discuss the questions on slide 7 and make notes on the worksheet. They should then craft a short written response on the question, using the key words at the bottom of slide 8. Follow the same pattern, for slides 9 - 12. Finally, slides 13 - 16 are there just there for reference. Use them if you want to, but delete them if you don't!
douglaswise
'Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha' lesson from the GCSE AQA English Language Paper 1 anthology

'Paddy Clarke Ha Ha Ha' lesson from the GCSE AQA English Language Paper 1 anthology

The focus of the lesson is on exploring how Roddy Doyle is able to realistically convey the impression of a child’s voice through language details and structural features. The worksheet breaks down the main narrative events of the extract; it can be used as a simple reference point for students or, alternately, for students to use as part of a retrieval task. There's a quick literacy activity on slide 4 of the presentation (parenthetical commas), which can be easily discarded if you're pushed for time. The extracts on slides 8, 9 and 10 are there to provide a starting point for guided group discussions.
douglaswise
Chapter 7 'Jekyll and Hyde' exam task and feedback sheet (GCSE English Literature, Paper 1 - AQA)

Chapter 7 'Jekyll and Hyde' exam task and feedback sheet (GCSE English Literature, Paper 1 - AQA)

The extract is taken from 'Incident at the Window'. The task requires students to explore the presentation of Dr Jekyll as a troubled character. There are separate sets of targets on the feedback sheet for the extract itself and for general academic writing. Teachers can highlight the targets that are appropriate and ignore the ones that aren't. Hopefully this will help to save a bit of time.
douglaswise
The presentation of the speaker and the emotions he feels in 'Neutral Tones', by Thomas Hardy

The presentation of the speaker and the emotions he feels in 'Neutral Tones', by Thomas Hardy

This is a single lesson on the presentation of the speaker and the emotions he feels in 'Neutral Tones', by Thomas Hardy. Firstly, students should retrieve relevant information about the speaker and the landscape before moving on to annotating the poem. Following that, there's a written task to finish. I've included a copy of the poem on the slides for group annotation. Hope the resources help!
douglaswise
Chapter 2 'Jekyll and Hyde' exam task and feedback sheet (GCSE English Literature, Paper 2 - Eduqas)

Chapter 2 'Jekyll and Hyde' exam task and feedback sheet (GCSE English Literature, Paper 2 - Eduqas)

The extract is taken from 'Search for Mr Hyde'. The task requires students to explore how tension is created at different points in the novel. There are separate sets of targets on the feedback sheet for the task itself and for general academic writing. Teachers can highlight the targets that are appropriate and ignore the ones that aren't. Hopefully, this will help to save a bit of time. There's also a copy of the Eduqas mark-scheme on the final page.
douglaswise
Developing a Growth Mindset (Roughly 35 Minutes)

Developing a Growth Mindset (Roughly 35 Minutes)

The activity is designed to help students understand that many tasks in life take time and effort to master - symbolised in this case by the construction of an origami penguin. The origami instructions are not my own (website: knowyourmeme), but I thought it might be helpful to include them. Although I've chosen to use a penguin, any simple origami animal should suffice!
douglaswise
'The Reluctant Fundamentalist' lesson from the GCSE AQA English Language Paper 1 anthology

'The Reluctant Fundamentalist' lesson from the GCSE AQA English Language Paper 1 anthology

The focus of the lesson is on exploring how Mohsin Hamid uses language to shape our impression of the speaker in the extract from 'The Reluctant Fundamentalist'. In terms of outcomes, the aim is for students to produce a relatively short, but high-quality, written response (containing appropriately used reporting and analysing verbs, conjunctions, and word-level terminology) - please see slide 3. At the beginning of the lesson, students should explore what the noun 'fundamentalist' means and how our expectations are shaped by the title of the extract. Following on from that, there's a clip from George Bush denouncing the 'axis of evil' that you might want to use to provide your wards with some contextual information. I've also added some slides that link to the November 2015 Paris attacks, plus a newspaper article. After that, students should read and discuss the extract; there's a simple retrieval task on slide 16 that can support this. Students should then discuss the question on slide 19 and make notes. They should then craft a short written response on the question, using the guidelines on slide 23. Finally, slides 24 - 27 are there just there for reference. Use them if you want to, but delete them if you don't!
douglaswise