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The History Bazaar

History teacher who enjoys experimenting with T&L strategies and putting these into resources! Enjoy, take a look around and leave a review if you find anything helpful!

History teacher who enjoys experimenting with T&L strategies and putting these into resources! Enjoy, take a look around and leave a review if you find anything helpful!
Medieval Entertainment
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Medieval Entertainment

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This lesson is focused on the question, ‘could you have fun in the medieval period?’ Learners have an opportunity at the start to reflect on the previous learning (and/or) feedback with a template for the teacher to complete showing WWW (What went well), EBI (Event better if) and Next Steps. Learners then describe the different forms of entertainment in the medieval period and explain these in the form of a PEEL paragraph (and/or) a poster to advertise a village fête. Activities include the link to medieval entertainment and modern forms of entertainment, an information hunt with information provided including template for the table learners can use, progress checks and a PEEL paragraph with guidance. Learners also have an opportunity to advertise the entertainment in a poster form with a model example – fun for all learners especially younger and creative. There is an opportunity at the end to make wider cross-curricular links and consolidate the learning. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
What was life like in a Medieval Village?
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What was life like in a Medieval Village?

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This lesson covers the beginnings of medieval life in England/Europe. Learners will investigate village life for people and describe different parts of a medieval village leading towards explaining the positives and negatives of village life. Activities include a review of the previous topic (whatever that might be in your establishment) and summarising contextual knowledge. The main activity is a ‘text-to-pictures’ in groups in which learners design their own village using information within the PowerPoint. Learners work in groups and will present their village to others building towards a differentiated extended writing activity. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
The Peasants' Revolt
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The Peasants' Revolt

2 Resources
This is two lessons about the Peasants’ Revolt in 1381. It covers the background including why the peasants were unhappy and the main events of the revolt. It explores the success and failures of the revolt and gives learners an opportunity to decide if they think it was successful. There is a variety of activities including the use of videos, diamond 9s, colour-coded categories, source analysis and extended writing. It has been presented in a way to make this complicated topic accessible to all learners with opportunities for challenges. All lessons have resources embedded in them with explanations throughout and would be accessible to learners in Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 (UK Years 5 – 8 or ages 9 – 13).
Medieval Life
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Medieval Life

7 Resources
This is a Learning Programme / Scheme of Work that covers Medieval Life in England / Europe. It follows the lives of people from the jobs that medieval people did, how the towns developed and how law and order was kept. It explores the entertainment enjoyed by medieval people and the hygiene of the towns. There is a variety of activities including peer assessment, use of videos, group work and individual extended writing. The lessons follow a clear learning thread from starters to engage, activities to learn new knowledge, checking progress throughout and ending with a review against the objectives. All lessons have resources embedded in them with explanations throughout and would be accessible to learners in Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 (UK Years 5 – 8 or ages 9 – 13).
The Peasants' Revolt - what happened?
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The Peasants' Revolt - what happened?

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This is the second lesson and final lesson about the Peasants’ Revolt and is focused on the events in June 1381. The objectives are to categories the reasons for the peasant’s anger, analyse sources to create a timeline of events and to reach a judgement about the success of the revolt. Activities include a review of why the peasants were angry (from the previous lesson), a brief overview of what a category is (and what categories could be applied to their anger) and learners will then analyse different sources in order to create a timeline of events in June 1381. Learners are asked to create their own title for each of the events as a way to show their understanding through summarising the key events. Learners finish with a colour-coded ‘success or failure’ activity and an opportunity to make a judgement about the success of the revolt through extended writing. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Fall of the Roman Empire
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Fall of the Roman Empire

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This lesson covers the fall of the Roman Empire, the reasons for the failure and gives learners an opportunity to judge which was the most important reason. Activities include ‘odd-one out’ starter, ‘back-to-back’ watching a video and using information as ‘research posts’. This is differentiated with a ‘diamond 8’ activity for lower ability learners which leads towards all learners deciding on the most important factor. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Using sources - Julius Caesar
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Using sources - Julius Caesar

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This lesson focuses on the type of leader Julius Caesar was and using source analysis to explain this. Learners will make a judgement and conclude the type of leader he was based upon the evidence. Begins with an activity about how learners analyse sources which has a differentiated approach and the main activity involves the creation of a newspaper, learners use different sources to construct this with differentiated guidance. All sources and the newspaper template is embedded within the PowerPoint and the slides have explanations of what to do at each point. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Roman Chester
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Roman Chester

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This is a lesson about by the Romans built a fort in Chester, the important features of a Roman fort and if they built these for the benefit of the local people or the Roman army. The activities include a ‘collective memory’ with groups of learners, using a ‘Venn diagram’ with a model of how to complete and an opportunity for extended writing which is differentiated. While this is specifically about Chester, this could easily be adapted to any Roman town for a local study and all resources have been embedded within the PowerPoint.
Roman Conquest of Britain
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Roman Conquest of Britain

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Covers the arrival of the Romans in Britain, background to their invasion and why the Romans were able to conquer Britain. Activities include source analysis, making ‘text-to-picture’ and mind-mapping. There is a final extended piece of writing activity at the end which would be good for all learners to show their knowledge and understanding. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanation on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Who worked in the Medieval Town?
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Who worked in the Medieval Town?

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This lesson developed on the previous knowledge of medieval life and explores the different jobs that people would have had in the medieval town. Firstly, learners will understand how goods are bought and sold today, use a source to investigate the jobs done in the medieval period and categorise the different jobs through an information hunt. Activities include source analysis, use of a freeze-frame activity and information hunt with a template table provided. Learners have regular progress checks throughout to assess learning with a final plenary which puts their learning into a fun text message. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Medieval Law and Order
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Medieval Law and Order

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This lesson is focused on how medieval law and order was kept. Learners will recall how towns tried to keep law and order and explain what ‘Trial by Ordeal’ involved. Learners will then reach a judgement on the effectiveness of medieval punishments. Activities include a true or false starter of strange modern laws, using sources to make inferences and summarising contextual knowledge. Learners have opportunities to use progress checks to assess their learning with a main activity of ‘maps from memory’ after watching a video with questions. Learners finish with a judgement based upon the effectiveness of these punishments (which can be an extended writing activity) and an opportunity to use empathy (SMSC links) with a ‘different shoes’ plenary. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Life in Medieval Towns
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Life in Medieval Towns

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This lesson explores the development of towns from the medieval village and what life was like for the people who lived in them. The focus is on economic, social, political and military aspects of the town and it builds towards students deciding, who benefited from the medieval town the most? Activities include watching a video describing a medieval town (embedded into the PowerPoint), source analysis of a medieval charter and categorising different aspects of a town in economic, social, political and military. This activity is differentiated for learners with some able to cut and stick these onto a template rather than write-out. The lesson finishes with a GCSE-style question which has progressive support including a writing frame. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Norman Conquest - Domesday Book
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Norman Conquest - Domesday Book

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This lesson allows learners to investigate what the Domesday Book was and what it intended to do. Learners will explain the importance and judge the significance through activities including ‘show me’ which links to modern jobs, source analysis within progress checks and using interpretations. This builds towards an assessment of the Learning Outcomes of writing which judge the knowledge and understanding gained within the lesson. Each slide gives explanations of what is required for learners to do and would be great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Nature of Medieval Warfare
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Nature of Medieval Warfare

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This lesson is an introduction into medieval warfare. It asks learners to describe their understanding of what warfare is, explain the nature of medieval warfare with the advantages and disadvantages, and finishing with an assessment about why battles were usually avoided. Activities include a starter about learners understanding of warfare, source analysis of a painting showing medieval warfare, a mind-map about the different aspects of medieval warfare including armies, commanders, strategies, weapons and protection. The lesson moves onto exploring the advantages and disadvantages and learners thinking about why battles were avoided. There are challenge and push further opportunities throughout with regular progress checks. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Medieval Warfare – The Battle of Falkirk, 1298
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Medieval Warfare – The Battle of Falkirk, 1298

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This lesson is focused on the Battle of Falkirk, 1298 within the context of medieval warfare rather than the Scottish War of Independence. The lesson asks learners to describe why the Scottish rebelled against the English, to explain the build up to the battle and to investigate who was victorious and why. The lesson concludes with learners assessing the role of William Wallace and Edward I. Activities include a brief background to the Scottish anger, a timeline of events in the build up to the battle, group work in which learners analyse the battle plans and the sequence of battle with a challenge to focus on key points and decisions in the battle. It finishes with learners assessing the leadership and role of William Wallace and Edward I and if the battle was won because of Edward or other factors. There is an extended writing opportunity where learners can decided the better leader and why. This lesson can be adapted to suit the needs of your learners with regular progress checks throughout and challenges to push all learners. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint including a differentiated worksheet with more support and there are clear explanations on each slide for both teacher and learners. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Change and Continuity in Medieval Warfare
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Change and Continuity in Medieval Warfare

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This is a historical skills based lessons which asks learners to identify the main differences between change and continuity, it then moves onto looking at the changes in medieval warfare and what stayed the same with a final focus on explaining how gunpowder developed with an overall judgement about the effectiveness. Activities include a start about how phones have stayed the same and changed, learners build upon their previous historical knowledge to apply this change and continuity skill to previous topics and then focus this on change and continuity in medieval warfare. Learners then have six sources to analyse which will further their understanding of gunpowder and how it was used during the medieval era which then culminates in a debate about the impact of gunpowder. There is an extended writing opportunity to push learners further and a vote to give their opinion about the impact of gunpowder (using an excel formula to create a pie chart). This lesson can be adapted to suit the needs of your learners with regular progress checks throughout. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and clear explanations on each slide. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Development of Medieval Warfare
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Development of Medieval Warfare

7 Resources
This is a Learning Programme / Scheme of Work that covers the Development of Warfare specifically focused on the Medieval Era. It follows the nature of medieval warfare with recruitment and training and the impact that this had on civilians. It takes a deeper look at two battles, Falkirk, 1298 and Agincourt, 1415 using battle plans and sources to develop learners understanding of medieval warfare (including change and continuity). There is a wide variety of activities throughout including peer assessment, use of videos, group work and individual extended writing. The lessons follow a clear learning thread from starters to engage, activities to learn new knowledge, checking progress throughout and ending with a review against the objectives. All lessons have resources embedded in them with explanations throughout and would be accessible to learners in Key Stage 2 and Key Stage 3 (UK Years 5 – 8 or ages 9 – 13). This would be a good Unit of Work as a stand-alone for your curriculum or to support progression towards GCSE Development of Warfare topics.
Who murdered Julius Caesar?
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Who murdered Julius Caesar?

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The lesson identifies some of the suspects involved in the murder, why they may have murdered him or been involved and what the impact of the murder might have been. This is presented in a ‘murder mystery’ type activities which involve learners investigating the different suspects and deciding their motive (and reasons why they might not be a suspect). This culminates into learners making a decision about who they believe murdered Julius Caesar. Resources are embedded into the PowerPoint and have been differentiated. All slides have explanations of what is required to be completed by learners. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Norman Conquest - Stone Keep Castles
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Norman Conquest - Stone Keep Castles

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This lessons offers learners an opportunity to explore the different parts of a Stone Keep castle and why William upgraded these from Motte and Bailey. The lesson begins with ‘pupil response’ or ‘purple pen’ time and gives learners a chance to reflect on previous learning and the teacher sections for WWW (what went well) and EBI (even better if) based upon class feedback. The lesson moves into previous knowledge about Motte and Bailey castles (positives and negatives) with learners moving on to exploring the Stone Keep castles built by William. The worksheets embedded into the PowerPoint have been differentiated and the lesson finishes with an opportunity for learners to be reflective and ask if an Anglo-Saxon did the lesson, what would they think!? Each slide gives explanations of what is required for learners to do and would be great for all teachers and non-specialists.
Medieval Warfare – The Battle of Agincourt, 1415
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Medieval Warfare – The Battle of Agincourt, 1415

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This lesson is focused on The Battle of Agincourt, 1415 between the French and English forces during the Hundred Years’ War. It asks learners to describe the key moments in the build up to the battle, explain how the English won even though they were outnumbered and assess the role of the longbow and if this was the decisive reason for the English victory. This lesson compliments the ‘Development of Warfare’ unit rather than a history of the Hundred Years’ War though it can be used as a stand-alone lesson. The main activity focus is the creation of a mind-map which learners will be guided though completion on each slide of the PowerPoint. It gives learners the background knowledge to the battle including key questions which will stimulate discussion, it moves onto source analysis including the use a battle-plan map and learners watch a video of the battle to further enhance their knowledge. The activities lead towards a final decision about the use of the longbow and if this was the decisive reason for the English victory is was it just part of numerous reasons? This can be done as an extended writing activity or as a class vote depending on your group / learners. This lesson can be adapted to suit the needs of your learners with regular progress checks throughout and challenges to push all learners. All resources have been embedded into the PowerPoint and there are clear explanations on each slide for both teacher and learners. Great for all teachers and non-specialists.