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Frenchified

Average Rating4.38
(based on 63 reviews)

I'm a French teacher in the USA. I've been teaching levels 1-4 for 27 years. I enjoy making products that students will enjoy reading. I am an early adopter when it comes to technology in the classroom and I have many items available in both digital and print versions.

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I'm a French teacher in the USA. I've been teaching levels 1-4 for 27 years. I enjoy making products that students will enjoy reading. I am an early adopter when it comes to technology in the classroom and I have many items available in both digital and print versions.
Digital Escape Game - Madrid
frackiewicz123frackiewicz123

Digital Escape Game - Madrid

(0)
Escape games can be an excellent method of getting students involved in learning, but if you don’t have the kit with locks, they can be tricky to do. Here’s a completely digital escape game - no/low prep, you just need to make sure that your students have internet access and can use Google forms! This escape game will have students learning about the sights and monuments in Madrid, including Porto Alcala, Gran Via, the Prado Museum, Retiro Park and the Royal Palace. Be aware that escape games are meant to be challenging - your students will have to work together, read the clues carefully, and be willing to take risks in order to crack the codes. The teacher’s guide includes all of the information and hints you need to help students who get lost along the way.
Digital Escape games - Spanish Bundle
frackiewicz123frackiewicz123

Digital Escape games - Spanish Bundle

5 Resources
Escape games can be fun, but if you don’t have the kit with locks, they can be tricky to do. This item is a set of five completely digital escape games - no/low prep, you just need to make sure that your students have access to Google Sites! The games are in a mixture of English and Spanish, so you can use them with a variety of levels.
Digital Escape Game - Cinco de Mayo
frackiewicz123frackiewicz123

Digital Escape Game - Cinco de Mayo

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Cinco de Mayo is almost here! Your friend from Puebla has sent you some candies form Mexico, but in order to open the box and retrieve them, you will have to figure out the codes that open the locks by learning about Cinco de Mayo and the traditions surrounding it. This is a challenging activity that students will need to work together and think critically in order to complete. Some readings are in English while others are in Spanish. This digital breakout game includes the following topics: Mole Poblano Benito Juarez Mariachi Music Ignacio Zaragosa The Battle of Puebla You can have students do this activity individually or in small groups. You do need internet access to do the activity. You may want to check to be sure that your district allows access to google sites before purchasing this item, you can use this link as a test to see that it works: Joyeux Noel. Note about digital breakouts, as they are new to the educational scene and can be confusing for those who have never done an ‘escape the room’ type game: The first clue will always be the most difficult for them. Once they figure that out, the others will be easier because they will get the idea of how things work. They will mouse over the images, looking for the hand or arrow that lets them know that it’s a link. Once they open the link, they’ll want to read the page, watch the video, etc. The clues are hidden in there. The tricky part is that they don’t know which clue is on which page - they have to work together, think about what they’re looking for, and think about what they’ve learned on each page. They know that they need certain things to open the locks - but they can’t be sure if they’ve got it until they try it. If they try a word or a number and it doesn’t work, they can keep trying until they figure out what it’s supposed to be. For sure it is a challenging activity - the first time I did one, my students were pretty confused. I guided them to opening the first clue but then told them they’d have to figure out what exactly they were looking for. Most of them did end up solving the puzzle, but a few groups were one clue short of solving it. Since you have the answers, you can guide your students if they need it. I had some groups who would never get the clue if I didn’t nudge them in the right direction. But I also had some who didn’t want any help and relished the challenge. It’s not really a question/answer sort of thing since that would be just a scavenger hunt or research project. They have to discuss what they think might be the most important things on each page and go from there.