Hero image

Education Technology, Languages, 3D Worlds

Welcome to my shop, which I'll be filling with language/lit/ed-tech resources. I'm also interested in 3D virtual worlds, and some of the resources I'm developing now are about how to use these exciting environments.

Welcome to my shop, which I'll be filling with language/lit/ed-tech resources. I'm also interested in 3D virtual worlds, and some of the resources I'm developing now are about how to use these exciting environments.
Becoming a Google Search Ninja
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Becoming a Google Search Ninja

(9)
This is a free, editable resource that introduces students to some clever ways to use Google search to make results more specific. It could be used as an activity in class or as homework. I recommend using it in class as a group-work activity, because some of the questions lend themselves to discussion. This resource is applicable across the disciplines, and will be particularly relevant for teachers that have students with digital devices. By working through the activity, students will learn a few Google search operators and symbols that will help them get more precise, relevant results with their Google searches. You may also want to see my resource about using Google Trends in the classroom: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/getting-trendy-with-google-trends-11103690 On twitter @gabrieljbaker Happy for any feedback :)
Latin Translation: Martial's Epigrams
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Latin Translation: Martial's Epigrams

(0)
This resource is for intermediate/advanced Latin students. It includes ten of Martial's epigrams in Latin with provided vocabulary. I recommend having students learn a little about this astonishing Roman author before they try to translate these epigrams. The first few epigrams I've included mostly in English, with just a little Latin to translate. The few at the end are entirely in Latin and may be challenging without help from the teacher. Suggestion: Bring your sense of humor to class on the day you use this resource!
Latin Inscription Translation Project
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Latin Inscription Translation Project

(0)
This resource has students translating a number of inscriptions from the Ancient Roman world. Many of the inscriptions are about gladiators, because this tends to be an exciting topic for middle and high school students. I provide ample vocabulary so that students can figure out the abbreviations in the inscriptions. This activity also has students creating their own inscriptions and thinking about their cultural importance. It's great for group work or a whole class activity. This resource is suitable for intermediate or advanced Latin students, but you should provide help where needed based on your class's expertise with Latin. Give me some feedback on Twitter @gabrieljbaker and let me know if you'd like to see more resources like this.
Ideas for Teaching the Odyssey with a Focus on Penelope
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Ideas for Teaching the Odyssey with a Focus on Penelope

(0)
Warning: This resource is for true Homer geeks. Additional warning: This is not a lesson plan or worksheet that is ready to be handed out as-is to students, but a resource for teachers who are thinking about approaches to teaching the Odyssey and who want some food for thought. This resource details an approach to teaching Homer's Odyssey that encourage a focus on the issue of whether Penelope is a hero or not. Thrown in the mix are perspectives from within the Odyssey itself, from common interpretations during the Middle Ages, and from modern scholars. It encourages them to come to their own conclusion based on evidence from the text and their own beliefs about the definition of heroism. It also encourages students to think about how interpretations of heroism, gender, and the Odyssey change over time. Happy for any feedback on twitter @gabrieljbaker
Virgil's Latin on American Symbols
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Virgil's Latin on American Symbols

(0)
This resource is for intermediate or advanced Latin students, but will be appropriate and interesting for beginning students if help from the teacher is provided. Students will explore how Virgil's Latin is used on a few American symbols: the great seal on the dollar bill, the state seal of Oklahama, and the state seal of Colorado. Students will learn about the original context of Virgil's Latin as well. Let me know on twitter @gabrieljbaker if you'd like to see more resources like this!
Business Language Role-Playing Activity in a 3D Virtual World
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Business Language Role-Playing Activity in a 3D Virtual World

(0)
One of the benefits of learning another language is that it allows you to conduct business with those who speak that language. This lesson is suitable for intermediate/advanced language students who have a solid grip on the fundamentals and who are now learning the vocabulary of the business world. Throughout the lesson, students prepare and present business “pitches” to each other in a virtual world via a role-playing activity. In advance of the lesson, claim an Edorble world by going to www.edorble.com and clicking the “Claim World” button. You’ll need to share your world code with your students.
Advanced Etymology + Word History Worksheet
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Advanced Etymology + Word History Worksheet

(0)
This is a challenging etymology resource intended for students that are particularly interested in language and the history of language. First, it asks students to define a number of etymology terms (e.g. cognate, derivative, loan word), and then it presents a number of questions that has them figuring out how words transform over time and how languages are related to each other. It has students coming up with their own examples of language transformations by doing some digging, and seeing how modern English words are related to or derived from Old English, Latin, Greek, French, and Spanish. At the end of the worksheet, students should have a better sense of how languages change over time and how English is related to other languages.
Global Classroom Collaboration in a 3D World: Why and How
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Global Classroom Collaboration in a 3D World: Why and How

(0)
This resource explains why global classroom collaboration is on the rise and describes one way that you can get started with it using a 3D world. In advance of reading the resource, I recommend heading to edorble.com, claiming your world (for free), and exploring it a little bit. If you're interested in giving this a shot, tweet us @edorble and we'll help you get started! See my shop or edorble.com/blog for more lesson ideas like this.
Having Student-Led Online Poetry Discussions in a 3D World
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Having Student-Led Online Poetry Discussions in a 3D World

(1)
Poetry can be beautiful, mysterious, insightful, and fun to discuss with others. Because the meanings of poems are not always obvious, poetry lends itself to close reading and discussion. Students and teachers often enjoy the challenge of picking apart the possible meanings of a poem and exploring their thoughts about them. This “how-to” will show you how you can facilitate poetry discussions with your class online in a 3D virtual world such as Edorble (free, in beta) or Second Life (free, but not private and hence riskier). I include suggestions for teachers and instructions for students for each “step” of the lesson plan, and I encourage you to modify any aspect of this lesson so that it can suit the need of your particular students, schedule, and learning goals. For online teachers, teachers in blended or flipped classrooms, or teachers who are looking for a new way for their students to interact and collaborate online, this lesson plan is worth checking out. Please leave a review with any feedback, and you can find me on twitter @gabrieljbaker Note: If you’re going to use Edorble for this activity, head to www.edorble.com and claim a virtual world for your class in advance of the lesson. Let your students know your world code. For more lesson plans that make use of virtual worlds, see my shop or head to edorble.com/blog
Getting Trendy With Google Trends
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Getting Trendy With Google Trends

(1)
This is a free, editable resource that introduces students to Google Trends, an incredible part of Google search which allows people to see how the rest of the world uses and has used Google across time and space. This resource may be particularly relevant for Social Studies teachers who like to have a current events component of their course, but it's also relevant to all teachers who want their students to have a better understanding of the Google Search ecosystem. Google Trends is fun to explore! I encourage you to take this resource and edit it based on the particular interests of your students and subjects of your class. I'm on twitter @gabrieljbaker, and please leave any feedback here as a review. Or just tweet me :) You may also want to check out my resource called "Becoming a Google Search Ninja" https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/becoming-a-google-search-ninja-11103684
Benjamin Franklin: Satire, Farts, Letters, and More!
gabrieljbakergabrieljbaker

Benjamin Franklin: Satire, Farts, Letters, and More!

(0)
This is a collection of some of Benjamin Franklin's lesser known works, each of which are followed by one or a few substantial questions. Many of the resources are examples of satire, and the questions ask students to explore their satirical elements. Included are a few of the letters that Franklin published under the pseudonym Silence Dogood. This resource is perfect to include in a unit about satire or early American literature. As a bonus I included one of Mark Twain's satirical pieces. After going through these readings and the questions, students will have a better understanding of the brilliant, funny mind of Benjamin Franklin. These readings are difficult, but would be manageable for advanced English students looking for a challenge. Thematic Warning: one of the writings is about farting (really), and one of the resources is about drinking. They are quite funny. Readings include: Benjamin Franklin - Rattlesnakes for Felons, The Speech of Miss Polly Baker, On Farting, A Witch Trial at Mount Holly, Idea of the English School, Daylight Savings, A Warning to Thomas Paine, Silence Dogood Letter 1, Silence Dogood Letter 12 Mark Twain - Investigating the Death of Mark Twain