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Education Technology, Languages, 3D Worlds

Average Rating4.92
(based on 20 reviews)

Welcome to my shop, which I'll be filling with language/lit/ed-tech resources. I'm also interested in 3D virtual worlds, and some of the resources I'm developing now are about how to use these exciting environments.

Welcome to my shop, which I'll be filling with language/lit/ed-tech resources. I'm also interested in 3D virtual worlds, and some of the resources I'm developing now are about how to use these exciting environments.
Advanced Etymology + Word History Worksheet
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Advanced Etymology + Word History Worksheet

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This is a challenging etymology resource intended for students that are particularly interested in language and the history of language. First, it asks students to define a number of etymology terms (e.g. cognate, derivative, loan word), and then it presents a number of questions that has them figuring out how words transform over time and how languages are related to each other. It has students coming up with their own examples of language transformations by doing some digging, and seeing how modern English words are related to or derived from Old English, Latin, Greek, French, and Spanish. At the end of the worksheet, students should have a better sense of how languages change over time and how English is related to other languages.
Ideas for Teaching the Odyssey with a Focus on Penelope
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Ideas for Teaching the Odyssey with a Focus on Penelope

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Warning: This resource is for true Homer geeks. Additional warning: This is not a lesson plan or worksheet that is ready to be handed out as-is to students, but a resource for teachers who are thinking about approaches to teaching the Odyssey and who want some food for thought. This resource details an approach to teaching Homer's Odyssey that encourage a focus on the issue of whether Penelope is a hero or not. Thrown in the mix are perspectives from within the Odyssey itself, from common interpretations during the Middle Ages, and from modern scholars. It encourages them to come to their own conclusion based on evidence from the text and their own beliefs about the definition of heroism. It also encourages students to think about how interpretations of heroism, gender, and the Odyssey change over time. Happy for any feedback on twitter @gabrieljbaker
Benjamin Franklin: Satire, Farts, Letters, and More!
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Benjamin Franklin: Satire, Farts, Letters, and More!

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This is a collection of some of Benjamin Franklin's lesser known works, each of which are followed by one or a few substantial questions. Many of the resources are examples of satire, and the questions ask students to explore their satirical elements. Included are a few of the letters that Franklin published under the pseudonym Silence Dogood. This resource is perfect to include in a unit about satire or early American literature. As a bonus I included one of Mark Twain's satirical pieces. After going through these readings and the questions, students will have a better understanding of the brilliant, funny mind of Benjamin Franklin. These readings are difficult, but would be manageable for advanced English students looking for a challenge. Thematic Warning: one of the writings is about farting (really), and one of the resources is about drinking. They are quite funny. Readings include: Benjamin Franklin - Rattlesnakes for Felons, The Speech of Miss Polly Baker, On Farting, A Witch Trial at Mount Holly, Idea of the English School, Daylight Savings, A Warning to Thomas Paine, Silence Dogood Letter 1, Silence Dogood Letter 12 Mark Twain - Investigating the Death of Mark Twain
Having Student-Led Online Poetry Discussions in a 3D World
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Having Student-Led Online Poetry Discussions in a 3D World

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Poetry can be beautiful, mysterious, insightful, and fun to discuss with others. Because the meanings of poems are not always obvious, poetry lends itself to close reading and discussion. Students and teachers often enjoy the challenge of picking apart the possible meanings of a poem and exploring their thoughts about them. This “how-to” will show you how you can facilitate poetry discussions with your class online in a 3D virtual world such as Edorble (free, in beta) or Second Life (free, but not private and hence riskier). I include suggestions for teachers and instructions for students for each “step” of the lesson plan, and I encourage you to modify any aspect of this lesson so that it can suit the need of your particular students, schedule, and learning goals. For online teachers, teachers in blended or flipped classrooms, or teachers who are looking for a new way for their students to interact and collaborate online, this lesson plan is worth checking out. Please leave a review with any feedback, and you can find me on twitter @gabrieljbaker Note: If you’re going to use Edorble for this activity, head to www.edorble.com and claim a virtual world for your class in advance of the lesson. Let your students know your world code. For more lesson plans that make use of virtual worlds, see my shop or head to edorble.com/blog