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Giles Ensor's Puzzle Shop

If you're looking for puzzles that are not only engaging but also educational, then my puzzles are for you.

If you're looking for puzzles that are not only engaging but also educational, then my puzzles are for you.
Sudoku Puzzles for Children in Years 1 to 6
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Sudoku Puzzles for Children in Years 1 to 6

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Are you looking for something to do with the kids? Do you need something to fill in the gaps in your lessons? Are you searching for worksheets to stop you pulling your hair out? Then look no further as I have the puzzle worksheets for you? Sudoku puzzles are an excellent resource for use in the classroom and can be used in many different ways. But the first thing to remember is that Sudokus are not about maths (or math if you’re from across the pond). In fact, even though the most common Sudoku puzzles use numbers, they can also be completed using shapes, letters, pictures and pretty much anything else you can think of. Sudoku puzzles are essentially about logic and problem-solving, so they don’t need to be used solely in maths classes. Problem-solving is an essential life-skill. Allowing your students to know that they have the ability to solve problems gives them the same ability to approach other problems in their lives. With that in mind, they can be used in any class that requires students to practise skills they don’t normally use. When using Sudoku in the classroom environment, you don’t have to stick to the more tried and tested ways of doing them (handing out worksheets and telling the kids to get on with them, I mean). Apart from anything else, it’s a bit of a waste of time and resources. For example, rather than handing out worksheets, you can put a puzzle up on the board using a projector or HDMI cable and get the students to copy the puzzle in their notebooks. Additionally, you don’t have to make the children work on their own. You can get them to work in groups to help foster a sense of teamwork. And remember that puzzles are not just to encourage engagement. Sudoku puzzles have been shown to improve memory and aid learning, and not just in maths. For instance, you can use Sudoku puzzles to practise forming letters in writing lessons, remember chemical symbols in chemistry lessons, or even Roman numbers to add interest in history lessons. Please note: I am also more than happy to make Sudoku puzzles on request. Just let me know the size of the puzzle you want and what you want to be included. However, remember the students will be doing them by hand so, for example, if you require shapes, don’t make them too complex otherwise you’ll have no time for anything else!
Free Sudoku Puzzles for the Primary Students
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Free Sudoku Puzzles for the Primary Students

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These are some free examples of the resources I make that you can use in the classroom to see if you like them and they are useful. If you do, please consider purchasing some of my bigger batches. Thank you. Are you looking for something to do with the kids? Do you need something to fill in the gaps in your lessons? Are you searching for worksheets to stop you pulling your hair out? Then look no further as I have the worksheets for you? Sudoku puzzles are en excellent resource for use in the classroom and can be used in many different ways. But the first thing to remember is that Sudokus are not about maths (or math if you’re from across the pond). In fact, even though the most common Sudoku puzzles use numbers, they can also be completed using shapes, letters, pictures and pretty much anything else you can think of. Sudoku puzzles are essentially about logic and problem-solving, so they don’t need to be used solely in maths classes. Problem-solving is an essential life-skill. Allowing your students to know that they have the ability to solve problems gives them the same ability to approach other problems in their lives. With that in mind, they can be used in any class that requires students to practise skills they don’t normally use. When using Sudoku in the classroom environment, you don’t have to stick to the more tried and tested ways of doing them (handing out worksheets and telling the kids to get on with them, I mean). Apart from anything else, it’s a bit of a waste of time and resources. For example, rather than handing out worksheets, you can put a puzzle up on the board using a projector or HDMI cable and get the students to copy the puzzle in their notebooks. Additionally, you don’t have to make the children work on their own. You can get them to work in groups, fostering a sense teamwork. And remember that puzzles are not just to encourage engagement. Sudoku puzzles have been shown to improve memory and aid learning, and not just in maths. For instance, you can use Sudoku puzzles to practise forming letters in writing lessons, remember chemical symbols in chemistry lessons, or Roman numbers to add interest in history lessons. Please note: I am also more than happy to make Sudoku puzzles on request. Just let me know the size of the puzzle you want and what you want included. However, remember the students will be doing them by hand so, for example, if you require shapes, don’t make them too complex otherwise you’ll have no time for anything else!