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Mr. Hassan History Resources

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My name is Andy and I make all my own resources. I love sharing them with other teachers so I hope you will find my mix of KS3 and KS4 (Edexcel) resources useful!

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My name is Andy and I make all my own resources. I love sharing them with other teachers so I hope you will find my mix of KS3 and KS4 (Edexcel) resources useful!
Slavery L5 - Life on Plantations
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Slavery L5 - Life on Plantations

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This lesson focuses on what life was like for a slave on the North American plantations. Students will begin by thinking about the types of jobs slaves would have done and then move on to examine different areas of life. This can either be done using a carousal activity suing the information cards provided, or using the textbook pages also provided, all resourced to match the lesson. Therefore, it can be taught in accordance with the needs of your group. The workbook pages have been provided also, customised to the lesson, although the use of these can be optional depending on your printing budget. There is also space on the 2nd page of the worksheets for an exam question to be attempted, and the question itself is provided as a hidden slide on the PPT. If you have any questions about this resource, comment below and I will try to respond as soon as possible.
Holocaust - The Final Solution
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Holocaust - The Final Solution

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This lesson focuses on the implementation of the Final Solution to the Jewish Question. The lesson begins with a math problem from Nazi schools to emphasise the fact that indoctrination was ever-present in German schools to normalise violence towards the jewish population in preparation. The lesson then takes a teacher-led approach through the material so that students can make notes as it is led. Students cover: The Madagascar Plan The reason for extinction being proposed Wansee Conference Einsatzgruppen How Jewish people were transported What camps looked like and what happened when Jewish people arrived. Gas chambers The lesson then goes on to discuss the human cost by looking at testimonies from Auschwitz–Birkenau. Students can share their thoughts about this afterwards if appropriate.
WW1 L7 - What Was Life Like in the Trenches?
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WW1 L7 - What Was Life Like in the Trenches?

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This lesson explores what life was like for soldiers in the trenches. Students begin by studying images and determining what they think the images tell us about life in the trenches. There is also a short video available which aids the learning. Students look at the average day of a soldier in the trenches. Students then use a series of sources to uncover for themselves the different problems that existed in the trenches, ranging from trench foot, shell shock, the duties and threats, food etc. To finish, students may use a template to write a guided letter to a loved one explaining all the problems that exist. Exclaimer: Some of the activities in this lesson were adapted from IC History. However, all resources have been recreated myself, typed myself and changed for use in my own lesson. The sources sheet has been completely developed from scratch, using similar sources and images to IC History, but with some changed and adapted for my use.
KS3 Slave Trade 6 Lesson Bundle
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KS3 Slave Trade 6 Lesson Bundle

6 Resources
This bundle contains 6 lessons (£13 normally) on the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade as well as an assessment which comes as part of the final lesson. The lessons contained in this ‘slavery’ bundle include: What was the Slave Trade Triangle How Were Slaves Captured Conditions on the Middle Passage (Double Lesson) What Happened at Slave Auctions? What Was Life Like on Plantations? Why Was Slavery Abolished?
KS3 World War 2 'Turning Points' Bundle
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KS3 World War 2 'Turning Points' Bundle

5 Resources
This bundle contains 5 lessons (£10.00 normally) on the the major turning points of WW2. Excellent for teaching and leading to an assessment with a judgement of the ‘biggest turning point.’ The lessons contained in this bundle include: Was Dunkirk a Success or Failure? Was the Battle of Britain Our Finest Hour? Was Operation Barbarossa a Turning Point? Was Pearl Harbour a Tactical Mistake? Was D-Day a Major Turning Point? Save 35%!
KS3 World War One 16 Lesson Bundle
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KS3 World War One 16 Lesson Bundle

16 Resources
This ‘WW1’ bundle has been created with 16 different lessons (normally £32 individually). Works out as 90p per lesson. You can save 56% with this bundle, which includes the following: Was Europe Ready for War? What Spark Started WW1? What Was the Schlieffen Plan? How Was Propaganda Used? Who Were the Conscientious Objectors? Why Did Soldiers Fight in Trenches? What Was Life Like in the Trenches? Why Was Censorship Used in WW1? What Happened at the Somme? Haig: Butcher or Hero Source & Interp Skills Lesson The British Empire in WW1 Was Gallipoli a Success or Failure? Was the German U-Boat Campaign Successful? Medicine in World War One Why Did Germany Lose the War? What Were the Terms of the Treaty of Versailles?
GCSE Weimar & Nazi Germany Bundle - Topic 2: Hitler Rise to Power
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GCSE Weimar & Nazi Germany Bundle - Topic 2: Hitler Rise to Power

5 Resources
This is a 7 lesson GCSE Edexcel bundle (two resources are double lessons) containing lessons for Key Topic 2 of the Weimar and Nazi Germany module, paper 3. Individually, the lessons would cost almost £12, so this bundle will save you nearly 45%. It has the following lessons: Hitler’s role in the early Nazi Party Causes and Consequences of the Munich Putsch The Lean Years and Bamberg Conference The Effects of the Great Depression on Hitler’s Rising Popularity Hitler’s road to the Chancellorship
WW1 L11 - The British Empire in WW1
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WW1 L11 - The British Empire in WW1

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This lesson focuses on the role of the Empire in WW1. Students will have a chance to look at some of the contributions from Indian, African, Australian etc. soldiers. Students look at the reasons why people of the Empire might want to join the war effort by looking at the role of Khudadad Khan. Students can look at different propaganda used and the effects it might have had on citizens of the Empire. Students can enjoy a carousal activity where different work stations have information about different countries and their contributions to the war. They use this to complete an worksheet activity on the subject. Students can then look at a scholarship viewpoint and then write an argument for or against regarding the Empire’s contribution.
Medieval - Crime & Punishment
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Medieval - Crime & Punishment

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This lesson focuses on the way that crimes were judged in the medieval period, including the use of early juries, the hue & cry, and the different trials of ordeal used, such as trial by fire, trial by water and trial by combat. The teacher can go through these on the board with the use a short video clip for each trial, or there is an optional table activity with information cards (could be a carousal as well) and students can complete in a table or there is an optional worksheet provided. Then, the lesson moves on to focus on punishments. These range from public punishment in the stocks etc. and also has an activity to learn about other methods, such as execution, scold’s bridle, amputation etc. Students can have a copy of a table of crimes committed and be asked to guess which punishment would fit the crime. The teacher has an answer’s slide to go through it. At the end, there is a written activity option to get students to either do a newspaper activity (instead of what’s on the slide) or a story about someone who was convicted and what happened to them at the trial and the punishment side of things. This lesson could easily be a double lesson if you want to make time for the literacy element, and students do enjoy getting creative with this. All videos used in this lesson are available to download (or watch straight) from the links provided.
Holocaust - Who Was Responsible?
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Holocaust - Who Was Responsible?

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This lesson focuses on who is most responsible for the Holocaust. Rather than making the focus about ‘Nazis’, this lesson deals with the distinction between perpetrators, collaborators, bystanders and resisters. This lesson is inspired and adapted from the Holocaust Educational Trust. I have created my own worksheet for this lesson to allow activities to be done all in one place. It is 3 pages in word and has been created to be printed A5 as a booklet, with the final page blank to be stuck in the student books. The lesson begins with a source which provokes a discussion about what is going on in the image. Students are asked who is the cause of the events int he image. It can be an interesting segway into who is to blame as there are Nazi officers and also normal civilians watching, like a little girl. The discussion can be useful. Then, students try to match up the key words to the meanings, then put these onto their worksheet. Once they know what perpetrators, collaborators, bystanders and resisters are, they can now annotate the image from the starter and justify their decisions. Students then read through a number of scenarios on their worksheet and colour code whether the people described are perpetrators, bystanders or resisters. Then, students plot the impact of the people in each scenario on the graph provided to show which ones were active or passive, and had a positive or negative result for the Jewish people in that scenario. This task can also be done using the card sort that is attached to this pack if you prefer a group orientated approach. If so, the graph could be blown up and the cards put on the graph as they work through the card sort as a group. The worksheet is provided just so students can keep the work in their individual books, but it’s up to you. Finally, students can discuss the results with the teacher, and then there are 3 questions as a plenary.
WW2 - Was Pearl Harbour a Tactical Mistake?
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WW2 - Was Pearl Harbour a Tactical Mistake?

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This lesson focuses on the attack on Pearl Harbour and whether it was a clever, killing blow by the Japanese, or a tactical mistake. This allows students to determine whether Pearl Harbour was a major turning point or not in WW2. The lesson begins by looking at the ‘infamy’ speech by Roosevelt, briefly, and to tease out of the students what it means and what event it refers to. The students then begin with a teacher-led on-board overview of the background leading up this event, which includes the key events that have happened so far (Dunkirk, Battle of Britain and Operation Barbarossa) and then why the USA were not in the war, and the intentions of Japan. The students then do a task that looks at whether a USA/Japan war was inevitable. The students study a series of timeline events. They use a word bank to fill in the gaps, then weigh up how much tension exists in each event. Then, students can watch a 7 minute clip from Pearl Harbour the film, weighing up whether the US were prepared, and what the main targets for the invasion were. The students then have a worksheet with information and sources. They use this to answer some questions about the attack itself, but more importantly, the consequences (from the sources). This will help the students decide if it was a major turning point or not. The students can then have a go at a final plenary to write a radio report of the event. They could choose, as a challenge, to write this report from an American or Japanese perspective rather than the given British one if you prefer.
Weimar & Nazi Germany L5 & L6 - The Ruhr and Hyperinflation
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Weimar & Nazi Germany L5 & L6 - The Ruhr and Hyperinflation

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This double lesson focuses on the problems of 1923, starting with the invasion of the Ruhr and then the resulting hyperinflation. The lesson begins with a starter activity, which is provided, to recap some previous knowledge on the recent problems faced by the Weimar Republic. The lesson then presents students with information about the Ruhr in the form of a worksheet and a story down the middle of the page. Students can practice their literacy by reading and answering the questions down the page and also providing an illustration. This will give the info and also there are links back to the Treaty of Versailles too. The students can then complete a source inferences question to practice exam skills. The students then get walked through the basics of hyperinflation on the PPT and are given an example. Students can then colour-code the ‘effects’ of hyperinflation and then use a card sort activity to identify those who did well out of the hyperinflation, and those who didn’t. This will allow you to give extended work on a 16 mark ‘how far do you agree’ question if you like. The main task here is to fill in the worksheet to show who the winners and loser of hyperinflation was, and why. All worksheets are in Publisher format. This lesson is based on the Edexcel spec, but can be adapted for others like AQA or OCR, or the IGCSE. Any worksheets provided can be printed individually or put into an A4 booklet and added to student files/plastic wallets. These lessons take their inspiration from many sources. Parts of this lesson draw particular inspiration from people like colleagues Steve Brown and Andrzej Matayla, and online educators like Greg Thornton.
KS3 Holocaust 3 Lesson Bundle
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KS3 Holocaust 3 Lesson Bundle

3 Resources
This is a 3 lesson KS3 bundle containing lessons about the Holocaust. Individually, the lessons would cost £6.00, so this bundle will save you over 33%. It has the following lessons: Antisemitism in Germany - A lesson about the growing discrimination in Germany over time using graphs and information. The Final Solution - A teacher-guide through what happened to the Jewish population. Students make notes. Who Was Responsible - A lesson asking students to compare bystanders, collaborators and active participants who perpetrated the crimes and weigh up responsibility. Please note the Final Solution lesson may contain images some may find disturbing. These may be replaced or deleted as needed based on your requirements.
WW2 - Was Operation Barbarossa a Turning Point?
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WW2 - Was Operation Barbarossa a Turning Point?

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The lesson focuses on Operation Barbarossa, including Stalingrad, and whether ti was a key turning point in winning the Second World War. the lesson starts by looking at some on-board information which can be run through with the students about what the operation was. Students can see a map and be asked why Hitler may want to break his agreement with Russia and invade. Then, the students are taken through the phases of the invasion from progress, delay and then freezing. The students then complete a worksheet which uses an information sheet to complete the first part. they read this information about the invasion and use it to complete the first section which is a fact file. Students are then asked about the consequences and then the second part of the worksheet has a number of key consequences which make this event important. Students then use it to colour-code by importance from little, to medium, to high importance. You may then want them to write something to summarise their findings. There are two picture source plenaries at the end which can provoke discussion.
WW2 - Was Dunkirk a Success or Failure?
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WW2 - Was Dunkirk a Success or Failure?

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This lesson focuses on whether the Dunkirk evacuation was a success for the British army, or a failure. The idea will be to have students make a judgement at the end. The lesson begins with an image from the Dunkirk evacuation and asks students what they see, what it shows and when/where it could be. This allows the students to start thinking about the event. The students are then taken through some slides giving a good background of Hitler’s blitzkrieg and the position of the allies by mid-1940. The students will be asked to decide what Britain should do about the difficult situation, before being shown an embedded video (WW2 in Colour, edited by me and cut to 6 mins) to give them a nice overview of the event and rescue, in colour. The students can then benefit from the information sheet (double sided) and answer some questions about the events. Then, students can discuss a source and whether the numbers of casulties/men saved etc. show a success or failure. It’s good for a discussion of both sides to show students perspective. Then a discussion of censorship on the next slide will tell the students more about why the British were ‘relentlessly positive’. Then the main, final task is for students to study the source on the information sheet and pick out arguments for and against it being a success or miracle. This can lead to a short written paragraph to conclude their thoughts.
WW2 - Was the Battle of Britain Our 'Finest Hour'?
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WW2 - Was the Battle of Britain Our 'Finest Hour'?

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This lesson focuses on the events and consequences of the Battle of Britain during the failed Nazi invasion of Britain - Operation Sealion. The lesson begins with a quote from Churchill and asks students to discuss what it might mean. this might help to get students thinking about the event, why its important and what the result could have been had it gone the other way. The students then get shown a map of Europe in September 1940 as Hitler is the master of Europe. Students can consider what Hitler should do and discuss the advantages of leaving Britain alone, or attacking her. This can be a useful discussion. You can also bring in strategy of how conquest could be achieved, what to watch out for etc. Then, students can watch a video provided. There is a link to it on Youtube from my own account which I have made private. You need to link to find it. The video is WW2 in Colour which I have cut from a 50min documentary to a 15 minute one. This you may choose to show in total, or just parts. The students then complete a short activity (you can always skip this if you feel it’s too much to cover) to show what problems both airforces faced going into the battle. The key activity is to give the students the double sided information sheet and have them answer the on-board questions in full sentences. This will give them a grasp of the key events. The students might be able to answer them from watching the video too. The students then begin looking through a series of sources. There are 15 provided. You can choose to scatter them around the room, or print some and move them around. The students complete a grid to show whether this event was ‘GREAT’ using the criteria (Groundbreaking, remembered…etc). There is a slide with a guide on how to use this for your support. At the end the students may then write about this event or if you are tying this in with other key events, they will certainly have short and long term consequences to be able to discuss. A plenary at the end can also be used to bring out the discussion and usually divides opinion as to the main reason the British won this battle.
WW2 - Was D-Day a Major Turning Point?
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WW2 - Was D-Day a Major Turning Point?

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This lesson focuses on the events of D-Day and whether it should be remembered as a turning point or not. The lesson begins with a ‘do it now’ task to review the other turning points I cover (Pearl, Stalingrad, Dunkirk, Battle of Britain) but if you have not covered these you can type in other questions. The lesson then gives a nice overview on the board of the situation by 1943/44. It covers the push of the USSR from the East and the need for a second front. The students are given information about the planned invasion and can discuss the things the allies would need to do to fully prepare for an invasion. There is then a video from Dan Snow about the preparation for D-Day, and there is a worksheet provided with a gap fill exercise for the students to answer either while it’s playing, or after. The students are then taken through the actual invasion phases from paratroopers, to distraction tactics and then to the bombardment and eventual invasion. Another video documentary (edited and cut to the necessary parts and included in the pack) is used to the then allow students to attempt some questions on the next part of their worksheet. Finally, the students consider the consequences and rank them in order. This can then be extended if you like so that students sum up their thoughts as to whether this was an important turning point. The final plenary is a source image and students may choose to write about it, or it can just be a discussion on usefulness and the message.
WW1 L9 - The Battle of the Somme - Success or Failure?
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WW1 L9 - The Battle of the Somme - Success or Failure?

(2)
This lesson combines teacher-talk and student independent scholarship and literacy work to examine the events which unfolded at the Somme. This is what the students will learn: Students begin by discussing the qualities of good and bad leadership. The teacher can take students, using questioning and probing, through the battle plan at the Somme. Students can be encouraged to engage in suggesting improvements or simply anticipating the outcome at each stage. A video clip from the comedy Blackadder can be used for fun and also in an engaging and relevant way with follow up discussion. Students will examine whether the battle was a success or a failure using facts on the board. Students study a brief scholarship quote and then use sources to determine which ones support or refute the statement from the scholar. Students then evaluate Haig’s responsibility as overall Field Marshall.
Women in WW1
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Women in WW1

(1)
This lesson focuses on the role that women played in WW1 and how it effected the suffrage movement. The lesson takes students through: The jobs that women did during the war Why so many women supported it the war. A deeper understanding of the types of tasks they did, but also expand on what effect this had not only on women’s attitudes, but the suffrage movement. The lesson ends with strengthening knowledge of the the Representation of the People Act and gives students a choice of creative homework activities to build on this knowledge.
Slavery L6 - Why Was Slavery Abolished?
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Slavery L6 - Why Was Slavery Abolished?

(1)
This is a Double Lesson introducing students to why abolition ended and then giving them an opportunity to write an assessment. Students begin by looking at Amazing Grace and William Wilberforce, before then studying the a combined video sequence from Amazing Grace to help facilitate discussion as to why there was so much resistance to abolition. Students then make notes on some key individuals in the abolition movement, then go deeper by studying and categorising reasons for the successful abolition movement. Students can use the additional sources to start preparing for their assessment and build some more evidence for the essay. They can then spend a second lesson also preparing then writing it using the Edexcel 12 Mark question structure ‘Explain Why’ - but this can be tweaked as you like. An extensive set of starter sentences are on the slides. A PEE planning sheet is also provided if you prefer that approach.