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Langy74's Shop

Average Rating4.53
(based on 216 reviews)

All my resources have been created to use with classes I teach. Often I've created resources because, for a particular topic, I haven't been happy with the number/standard of the examples in a textbook. Sometimes I've created worksheets for certain topics (e.g. graph transformations) because I feel my classes will make greater progress on a printed worksheet than trying to work from a textbook. I always aim to produce high-quality resources that improve the students' learning and understanding.

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All my resources have been created to use with classes I teach. Often I've created resources because, for a particular topic, I haven't been happy with the number/standard of the examples in a textbook. Sometimes I've created worksheets for certain topics (e.g. graph transformations) because I feel my classes will make greater progress on a printed worksheet than trying to work from a textbook. I always aim to produce high-quality resources that improve the students' learning and understanding.
Convex, concave curves and points of inflection (new A level maths)
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Convex, concave curves and points of inflection (new A level maths)

(2)
This 11-page resource covers all the required knowledge and techniques for determining if curves are convex/concave and finding points of inflection, as required for the new A level. In each section it contains notes, explanations and examples to work through with your class followed by an exercise of questions for students to attempt themselves (answers included). The sections/topics are: 1.Convex and concave curves (a) determine from a sketch if curve is convex, concave or neither (b) find the values of x for which a graph is convex (or concave) © show algebraically that a function is convex (or concave) 2.Points of inflection (a) find the point(s) of inflection on a graph (b) determine whether a point of inflection is stationary or non-stationary © show that a curve has no points of inflection (d) use point(s) of inflection to determine the values of x for which a curve is convex (or concave) This projectable and printable resource will save you having to create or write out any notes/examples when teaching the topic, and will make things easier for your students as they can just work directly on the given spaces provided for solutions. Answers to all exercises are included. Here is an example of one of my A level resources that is freely available: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/differentiation-and-integration-with-exponential-and-trigonometric-functions-new-a-level-11981186
Solving linear inequalities worksheet + homework/test
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Solving linear inequalities worksheet + homework/test

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This worksheet covers how to solve single and double-sided inequalities and includes representing the solution on a number line as well as considering examples where integer solutions are required. The introduction covers what the solution to a linear inequality should look like and, by means of a few examples, explores the similarities and differences between solving equations and inequalities. The first exercise (52 Qs) then gives students practice solving inequalties of the form ax+b>c, x/a+b The second section focuses on double-sided inequalities such as 3 The final section is designed to help students consider the integer solutions to an inequality. In the examples students need to find the smallest possible integer value of n if n>p, the largest possible integer value of n if n Answers to all the exercises are provided, including the solutions on number lines. Also included is a homework/test with fully worked solutions.
A ten page worksheet to introduce matrices
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A ten page worksheet to introduce matrices

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This worksheet covers the types of calculations that are possible with matrices and provides students with plenty of practice of each calculation. For each type of calculation there is an introduction, some examples to do as a class and then an exercise for students to work through. In total there are over 60 questions for students to complete, all answers to the exercises are provided. Note that this resource was designed specifically for the Level 2 Further Maths qualification, but can still be used an introduction to calculations with matrices.
Angles in parallel lines worksheet
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Angles in parallel lines worksheet

(27)
This simple worksheet is a good way to introduce/review angles in parallel lines. It begins with diagrams of corresponding, alternate and allied (supplementary) angles, then there are some examples to work through with your class. On the second page there is a short exercise with similar problems for the class to do themselves. Answers to the exercise are included.
Finding areas by counting squares
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Finding areas by counting squares

(1)
A simple resource to give your class practice of finding the area of a shape by counting squares. It has brief notes and examples at the start, then an exercise with 18 questions for students to attempt (answers included). The shapes are squares, rectangles, triangles and compound shapes using these 3 shapes (so no circles or parts of circles).
Linear inequalities on number lines
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Linear inequalities on number lines

(6)
This simple worksheet can be used to introduce/practise using number lines to represent inequalities. The worksheet starts with a reminder about the different inequality symbols and what they mean. There are then a few examples (to do with your students) of representing inequalities on number lines and writing down the inequalities represented by given diagrams. There is a short exercise with 16 of each type of question - answers are included.
Worksheets to practise finding stationary points and their nature
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Worksheets to practise finding stationary points and their nature

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The first worksheet introduces the method for finding the point(s) on a curve with a particular gradient. There are a few examples to work through as a class and then 16 questions for students to attempt. The second worksheet focuses on finding stationary points. Again, it explains the method, has a few examples to work through as a class and then 20 questions for students to complete. The worksheet then has a section that can be used to explain how to determine the nature of a stationary point by considering the gradient of the curve just before/after the point. There are some examples to do as a class and then 8 questions for students to complete. The final worksheet can be used to explain and practise using the second derivative for determining the nature of stationary points. Answers to all exercises are included. Note that this resource was designed specifically for the Level 2 Further Maths qualification, so only covers differentiating functions with positive integer powers such as y=5x^3-4x+2, but can still be used an introduction to the general method of finding stationary points on a curve.
Proof by contradiction (new A level maths)
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Proof by contradiction (new A level maths)

(1)
This short worksheet can be used to deliver the topic of proof by contradiction in the new A level specification for all exam boards. A useful resource to help deliver this new topic - fully worked solutions are included for all examples and questions in the exercise. It begins with 5 examples to work through with your class (the full proofs are given in the teacher’s version). The examples are carefully chosen so that, for the final example, students have seen the results/techniques they need to prove that the square root of 5 is irrational. Students are expected to be familiar with a proof of the infinity of primes, so on the next page this proof is given in full, together with some numerical examples that should help students understand part of its argument. There is then an exercise with 9 questions for students to attempt themselves (full proofs provided). A homework/test is also included (7 questions), with fully-worked solutions provided. Here is an example of one of my A level resources that is freely available: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/differentiation-and-integration-with-exponential-and-trigonometric-functions-new-a-level-11981186
Newton Raphson method (new A level maths)
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Newton Raphson method (new A level maths)

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This 19-page resource covers all the required knowledge and techniques for using the Newton Raphson method to find roots of an equation, as required for the new A level. In each section it contains notes, explanations and examples to work through with your class followed by an exercise of questions for students to attempt themselves (answers included). Also included is multiple-choice assessment that can be used as a plenary or brief homework. The sections/topics are: 1.Introduction to the method (a) the iterative formula and a graphical interpretation of the process (b) using the method to find successive approximations or an estimate of a root © different ways in which the formula may be written © illustrating the method on a diagram 2.Conditions where the Newton Raphson method fails (a) what happens if an approximation occurs at a stationary point of f(x) (b) situations where successive approximations converge to a different root © situations where successive approximations do not converge to a root (d) what happens if an approximation is outside the domain of f(x) This projectable and printable resource will save you having to create or write out any notes/examples when teaching the topic, and will make things easier for your students as they can just work directly on the given spaces provided for solutions. The exercises contains 35 questions for your students to complete. Answers to all exercises are included. Here is an example of one of my A level resources that is freely available: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/differentiation-and-integration-with-exponential-and-trigonometric-functions-new-a-level-11981186
Simultaneous equations (elimination method)
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Simultaneous equations (elimination method)

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These resources are for solving linear simultaneous equations using the method of elimination. The presentation explains how to determine whether to add/subtract the equations to eliminate a variable, and includes the first step in a number of examples. There is a printable version of the presentation for your students to complete as you work through the powerpoint. The next resource is designed to help your students master the critical first step of deciding whether to add/subtract the equations and performing that operation accurately. There are a few examples to work through as a class and then there are nearly 50 questions for students to complete themselves. Answers are included. There are then two worksheets for students to work through, both given with and without the answers, so they can be used as classwork or as homework. The first worksheet contains examples that do not require any multiplication, the examples on the second worksheet do require multiplication of at least one of the equations.
Trigonometry (new A level maths)
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Trigonometry (new A level maths)

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These 2 resources cover all the required knowledge and techniques for trigonometry, as required for the AS part of the new A level. In every section it contains notes, explanations and examples to work through with your class followed by an exercise of questions for students to attempt themselves (answers included). The first resource is a 27-page booklet which covers the following: 1.The graphs of trigonometric functions, their period and amplitude/asymptotes 2.Exact values of trigonometric functions 3.Trigonometric identities 4.Finding the value of other trigonometric functions given, for example, sin x = 0.5 where x is obtuse 5.Solving trigonometric equations (3 different exercises on this, with increasing difficulty) The second resource is a 13-question assessment that can be used as a homework or test. Fully worked solutions to this assessment are provided. The third resource is a 15-page booklet which covers the following: 1.Using the sine rule to find angles/sides in a triangle 2.Ambiguous case of the sine rule 3.Using the cosine rule to find angles/sides in a triangle 4.Area of triangle = 0.5ab sin C - using this, together with the other rules, to determine the area of a triangle This projectable and printable resource will save you having to create or write out any notes/examples when teaching the topic, and will make things easier for your students as they can just work directly on the given spaces provided for solutions. Answers to all exercises are included. Here is an example of one of my A level resources that is freely available: https://www.tes.com/teaching-resource/differentiation-and-integration-with-exponential-and-trigonometric-functions-new-a-level-11981186
A "treasure hunt" activity on averages
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A "treasure hunt" activity on averages

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Two versions (with/without frequency tables) of a treasure hunt activity for a class to attempt individually or in groups. There are 24 questions, numbered from 1 to 24. Each group chooses a number from 1 to 24 at random (or you can assign them a start number), and this is the number of the first question they should attempt - this should be written in the top-left circle on their answer grid. Their answer to their first question should be a whole number from 1 to 24 - this should be written in the next circle on their grid and this is the number of the next question they should attempt. e.g. if a group starts on Q6 and they think the answer to Q6 is 13 then after Q6 they should attempt Q13 (and they should have 6 -> 13 on their answer grid). If they answer the questions correctly they end up with the same chain of answers as on the solution, if they make a mistake they will repeat an earlier question and at that point you can decide how much help to give them sorting out their error(s). This activity works best if you can stick the 24 questions around a large classroom or sports hall so the groups have to run around to find their next question. All the classes I've done these activities with have loved them.
Introductory presentation and worksheet on filling containers
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Introductory presentation and worksheet on filling containers

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The presentation introduces the idea of drawing a graph to represent how quickly a container fills with liquid over time. The print-version can be given to pupils to make notes on and complete as the presentation is shown. The worksheet is designed to test their understanding after completing the presentation (answers are included).
Introduction to differentiation and finding the gradient of a curve
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Introduction to differentiation and finding the gradient of a curve

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The presentation and accompanying worksheet introduces the topic of differentiation by considering the gradients of progressively smaller chords that are used to estimate the gradient of the curve/tangent at the point. Students use this method to find the gradient at some points on the y=x^2 curve and then on the y=x^3 curve - from these results they should be able to guess at generalising the method for differentiating x^n and then ax^n. This presentation and worksheet take a while to work through so this may take up a whole lesson. The worksheet starts by reminding students how to differentiate and what dy/dx represents. In section A there are 18 examples of finding dy/dx to work through as a class, and then 30 questions for students to complete on their own. In section B there are a few examples of finding the gradient of a curve at a given point (to do as a class), then 10 questions for students to complete on their own. All answers are provided for the students' questions. Note that this resource was designed specifically for the Level 2 Further Maths qualification, so only covers differentiating functions with positive integer powers such as y=5x^3-4x+2, but can still be used an introduction to differentiation in general.
Multiple-choice questions on area and perimeter of circles and sectors
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Multiple-choice questions on area and perimeter of circles and sectors

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This powerpoint presentation contains 25 multiple-choice questions on the topic of area and perimeter of circles and sectors. It is a fun way to assess the whole class at the end of teaching this topic, or it can be used as a competitive activity with the class divided into teams. The questions are designed to be attempted without a calculator. Each questions has 4 possible answers from A to D. This activity works best if each person/team has (coloured) cards with the letters A to D on to hold up to show what they think is the correct answer.
Activity to practise using bearings and scale
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Activity to practise using bearings and scale

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This is a desert-island themed activity where students must follow instructions involving bearings and using the scale of the map to find where Mr.Crusoe visits each day. All my classes have loved this activity (and have enjoyed colouring in the map afterwards!). Make sure the map is printed as A3 size or the scale will not be correct!
A range of resources for identifying equations, expressions, identities and formulae
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A range of resources for identifying equations, expressions, identities and formulae

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The powerpoint presentation can be used to introduce this topic, containing examples and explanations. The notes and examples sheet can just be handed out as a reminder during the tasks, or later as a revision resource. The first activity just requires the students to indicate on a grid whether each item is an equation, expression, identity or formula. The second activity involves cutting out each item and putting/sticking it into the correct column on the answer table. All answers are included.
Worksheets on increasing / decreasing functions and sketching graphs
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Worksheets on increasing / decreasing functions and sketching graphs

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The first worksheet has an introduction and explanation about increasing/decreasing functions, a few examples to work through as a class and then an exercise with 11 questions for students to complete. Answers to the exercise are included. The second worksheet gives students some practice at using differentiation to help sketch graphs. There are a couple of examples to go through with your class and then an exercise with 7 questions. Solutions are provided. Note that this resource was designed specifically for the Level 2 Further Maths qualification, so only covers differentiating functions with positive integer powers such as y=5x^3-4x+2, but can still be used an introduction to the general method of increasing/decreasing functions and sketching.
Worksheets to practise finding the equation of a quadratic graph
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Worksheets to practise finding the equation of a quadratic graph

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Three resources to practice finding the equation of quadratic graphs from different types of information. This is a tricky topic and is likely to stretch an able GCSE group. The first resource is intended to be used as examples to work through as a group, the other resources are for additional practice. All solutions are provided. Note that simultaneous equations and solving quadratics by factorising is required prior knowledge.
Worksheets on distance-time and velocity-time graphs
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Worksheets on distance-time and velocity-time graphs

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Each worksheet has a number of examples of graphs for students to learn/practise finding information from the graph. The worksheets include estimating velocity or acceleration by drawing a tangent to the curve. All solutions are included.