Hero image

Lrigb4's Shop

Unique resources created by an experienced Secondary English and History teacher. These are academically rigorous resources that target children between 13 and 18 years of age.

178Uploads

36k+Views

3k+Downloads

Unique resources created by an experienced Secondary English and History teacher. These are academically rigorous resources that target children between 13 and 18 years of age.
Analysing Documentaries - Unit Introduction
lrigb4

Analysing Documentaries - Unit Introduction

(2)
This unit was designed for a year 10 English class in Australia. Within this unit students learn to analyse and evaluate how human experience is represented in new media texts and documentaries, including the use of images. Students will also develop a critical understanding of the contemporary media and analyse the differences between news media texts. This PowerPoint introduces students to what a documentary is and how they can have powerful social and political influence. The lesson goes on to outline the key features of a documentary and the two main types of documentaries (objective and subjective). It explains the difference and then includes a series of short clips for students to view and decide whether it is an objective/subjective documentary. It also includes a research activity (homework sheet) for students to investigate the works of Michael Moore.
Analysing Documentaries - Key Terms
lrigb4

Analysing Documentaries - Key Terms

(0)
This powerpoint introduces students to key terms which are necessary for a study of documentaries e.g. intertitle, masked interview etc. After these terms the lesson introduces students to audio and visual devices which are used to position audiences in documentaries e.g. narration / voice over, music, sound effects, slow motion and other visual editing effects. After copying these notes students view a small clip about climate change from a biased documentary and have to practice identifying these features.
Satire featuring teenagers
lrigb4

Satire featuring teenagers

(0)
Two PowerPoints for a 10 English class. 1) defines satire, introduces key terms that students need to know including hyperbole, irony and parody. Introduces Daria as an example satirical text.An example clip and viewing questions. 2) Defining mockumentaries. How mockumentaries use satirical elements to reflect human experience. View excerpts an example mockumentary (Summer Heights High). 3 clips and responding questions.
Australian Stereotypes - Crocodile Dundee
lrigb4

Australian Stereotypes - Crocodile Dundee

(0)
Two PowerPoints for a 9 English Unit. 1) The first PowerPoint includes a synopsis of the film and the film trailer is embedded. This is followed by a range of clips and viewing questions. It also includes information about how Indigenous Australians are portrayed in the film. Additionally, there is a section on exploring key quotes. Students have to pick out the slang and the beliefs of the protagonist which are indicated in the quote. 2) The second PowerPoint is a paragraph writing lesson. It takes students through the various stereotypes in the film and includes some pre-writing (planning) steps. It reviews the PEEEL paragraph structure. It includes some scaffolding (suggested sentence starters) along with an example paragraph (which is colour coded to indicate which section it addresses). After this activity, there is information about modality and some examples of high and low modality words. There is also some information about linking words.
Teen Stereotypes Unit
lrigb4

Teen Stereotypes Unit

(0)
PowerPoint 1: Unit introduction including classroom expectations (rules), an explanation of the unit, key questions for the unit, explaining the 2 assessment tasks, looking at famous quotes about teens and seeing if they agree, a list of teen issues and themes, common settings and characters for teen films. PowerPoint 2: exploring teenage stereotypes. This lesson defines stereotypes and gives examples of what stereotypes are, explores why we stereotype people, looks at common stereotypes about teenagers. The PPT includes excerpts from 2 Hollywood films (10 Things I Hate About You & Mean Girls) and questions to encourage students to identify the stereotypes in them.
The news: What makes a story newsworthy?
lrigb4

The news: What makes a story newsworthy?

(0)
The various factors that make a story newsworthy. Definitions, written examples and film examples. Topical issues from the past e.g. Tsunami, Beaconsfield Mining, Brisbane Floods.
Reading comprehension booklet - Parvana aka The Breadwinner
lrigb4

Reading comprehension booklet - Parvana aka The Breadwinner

(0)
This booklet has been designed as part of a year 8 English unit of work on Parvana (a novel set in Afghanistan during the reign of the Taliban). It includes activities about characters, the setting and language features which students are to complete as they read the novel. There are also questions about the events/themes/character's perspectives et cetera for each chapter. This is all in preparation for a creative writing assessment where students take what they have learned to create a written literary transformation (a short story from a marginalised character's perspective). Their short story has to focus on a moral issue within the novel. I have referenced the other study guides I drew on when creating this resource.
Tomorrow when the war began chapter summaries (for teachers) and study guide (for students)
lrigb4

Tomorrow when the war began chapter summaries (for teachers) and study guide (for students)

(0)
Item 1: Key points from each chapter plus quotes related to moral dilemmas. This is a useful resource for teachers to save you from re reading the novel each year. Item 2: A booklet to give students as they work through the novel. It includes key questions, some artistic activities (e.g. drawing a map from what they have read, creating a comic strip summary of a key chapter etc). Activities can be assigned for homework or completed in class.
Crime fiction: Hard Boiled Fiction
lrigb4

Crime fiction: Hard Boiled Fiction

(1)
Introduction to the hard-boiled genre of crime fiction (Set in1930s - 1950s America) This PowerPoint examines the genre conventions of hard-boiled fiction, the typical protagonist of these tales & events that were occurring in American society at the time these tales were written, and how these influenced these texts. Students will watch a trailer for The Maltese Falcon Trailer (a famous example). The movie of The Maltese Falcon is dated 1941, during the War, but the story was published in 1930: it’s a tale of the roaring ‘20s. The PPT also includes a trailer for a recent example (the HBO television series Boardwalk Empire) which recreates this era.
10 Things I Hate About You Workbook
lrigb4

10 Things I Hate About You Workbook

(0)
A student workbook for watching the film including; a synopsis, a list of characters, viewing questions, themes in the film, key quotes & what others have said about the film. The second is annotated notes taken from Cateforis, T. (2009). Rebel girls and singing boys: Performing music and gender in the teen movie. Current Musicology, (87), 161-190,247. Retrieved from http://search.proquest.com/docview/224870683?accountid=16285
Moral Dilemmas - designer baby
lrigb4

Moral Dilemmas - designer baby

(0)
This lesson is an introduction to a moral/ethical dilemma - designer babies and saviour siblings. It defines each of these terms, includes quotes from doctors, a discussion of what genetic testing can currently do and a speculation what it could be used for in the future, some questions about the ethics of genetic testing, three case studies for students to consider, and a film trailer from My Sister's Keeper in preparation for watching this film.
Reading comprehension about social media
lrigb4

Reading comprehension about social media

(0)
A reading comprehension activity I made using the THREE LEVEL GUIDE structure explained on http://www.myread.org/guide_three.htm The article is about the effects of social media on teens.
Photography - tips for composition
lrigb4

Photography - tips for composition

(1)
This PowerPoint is designed to last for a few lessons and contains 54 slides with tips for photo composition. It teaches students about the effects of lines (straight and curved) and activities to check whether students can identify horizontal, vertical and diagonal lines within images. It also has activities and information for shapes and silhouettes, patterns and colours. Additionally, there is information about shot sizes and angles (no activities just discussion) and other general composition tips.
Introduction to feature articles and their components
lrigb4

Introduction to feature articles and their components

(1)
Defining feature articles and the genre conventions (Language features, generic structure, layout, grammar, vocabulary, expected paragraph length, cohesive ties). The difference between a traditional news story and a feature article. An example satirical feature article with comprehension questions (and annotations). Plus some tips for how to create a killer headline.
Homework booklet for students reading Once by Morris Gleitzman
lrigb4

Homework booklet for students reading Once by Morris Gleitzman

(0)
Includes 6 weeks worth of homework activities including chapter questions, a vocabulary list (and activities) and tips for creative writing. It steps students through an assessment task which requires students to write a short story (a transformation of a section of the novel and a preface justifying their creative decisions). Specific task details are below. Mode/Medium: Imaginative Written short story (fiction). Subject Matter: Throughout time short stories have captured the imaginations of both readers and listeners. A good short story will capture the interest of its audience and hold it to the end. Purpose: To entertain and demonstrate your knowledge of the short story genre. Task: For this task you have a choice: 1. Write an imaginative short story that creates a character or "gives voice" to a silenced or marginalised character in the novel that you have studied in class. 2. Place the character into the novel which you have studied in class. This can be at the beginning, the middle or end of a scene. For example, you might write from the perspective of someone who observed an event, assisted the protagonist or befriended them. Or you may create a new character. E.g. A new best friend for the protagonist. Your teacher will explain what it means to "give voice" to a character in a novel. Your character must interact with the novel's protagonist. You may change the storyline and plot to accommodate your character if you desire, however, your story must remain true to the themes and setting of the novel. (E.g. you can't turn it into a comedy or change the country where the novel is set). Requirements: Length is to be 400-500 words plus a 100 word preface explaining how the story is both original and imaginative. You must demonstrate that you have a sound knowledge of short story conventions and adhere to the short story structure. You can make your story both original and imaginative in the following ways: • Creative use of the conventions of a short story, for example a twist at the end. • Create non-stereotyped characters that make unpredictable choices. • Juxtapose related texts. • Promote alternative beliefs and values through your writing.
The Discourse of Power and Ambition in Macbeth
lrigb4

The Discourse of Power and Ambition in Macbeth

(0)
A PowerPoint designed to last a few lessons. It explores two key themes in Macbeth: Power and Ambition. After defining these terms it looks at specific examples from the play. It includes prompting questions to get the students thinking. It also introduces a continuum of power and how this is illustrated within the play: The seduction of power - The lust for power - The obsession with power - The seizure of power - The abuse of power - The corruption by power - The insatiability of power - The destruction resulting from the obsession and abuse of power. It also includes key quotes from the play which demonstrate this. Finally, this PowerPoint includes exam advice including how to plan for the test and structure the essay.
Visual source analysis - story books
lrigb4

Visual source analysis - story books

(0)
Two PowerPoints which include scans from two picture book memoirs. It includes pre-reading questions. The powerpoint also introduces key terms for analysing these visuals: visual components of a text such as placement, salience, framing, representation of action or reaction, shot size, social distance and camera angle. Body Language – A non-verbal form of communication including facial expression, posture & gestures. Salience – a strategy of emphasis, highlighting what is important in a text. In images, salience is created through strategies like the placement of an item in the foreground, size and contrast in tone or colour. There are also comprehension questions and an explanation of things to note about the illustrations.
War Poetry - Texts about the Vietnam War - I was only nineteen and Homecoming
lrigb4

War Poetry - Texts about the Vietnam War - I was only nineteen and Homecoming

(0)
A lesson aimed to help shape student's understanding the lived experiences of soldiers in Vietnam. It focuses on two key texts: I was only 19 and Homecoming. The PPT includes a video of the song I was only 19 which students will listen to. They will then view key lyrics and talk about the representation of the Vietnam war in this text (including the literary devices used). After this is some information to help students empathise with what this would have been like especially for the conscripts. Some brief info is provided about 'fragging' and how the treatment the Veterans received upon their homecoming severely damaged countless veterans. It briefly looks at lyrics from Khe Sanh which discuss the experiences of a returned soldier. The remainder of the PowerPoint explores the poem Homecoming (which I ran as a separate lesson). 2) a handout with questions about Homecoming. We will then turn our focus to the major poem for this war in our booklet (Homecoming). We will talk about the difference between these representations.