War poetry - Analysing poems about the Atomic bombing of Hiroshima during World War Two

War poetry - Analysing poems about the Atomic bombing of Hiroshima during World War Two

3 Resources 1) A handout with questions for the three poems in the booklet about the atomic bombing (for students to complete as revision 2) A PowerPoint which first explores survivor's recounts of the bombing. This is to help students to understand how witnessing the bombing would influence the worldview of a person and be able to explain how this would insert subjectivity into poems written by survivors. View an excerpt of a documentary on the atomic bomb (which simulates the blast and includes interviews with survivors – one of which is a poet who will be studied in the next lesson. Students will read the poem 'At the makeshift aid station' together stanza by stanza, taking time to address the questions in the prompts down the side. The significance of the reference to the cherry blossoms will be explained so that students can reflect on the effect of this symbolism. It includes some other discussion questions which will help them to think like they need to for their feature article under exam conditions... 3) A PowerPoint which analyses Takashi Tanemori’s Blades of Grass in a Dreamless Field. Information about the author and something which shaped his belief system (the bushido code). What must be understood about the author in order to best interpret the poem. There are questions, discussion points and other annotations alongside each stanza of the poem.
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Political cartoons

Political cartoons

A lesson used in a Senior Authority English class to teach students how to analyse visual images in preparation for the QCS test. It allows students to practise their use of the following core skills or common curriculum elements (CCEs): CCE 5 Interpreting the meaning of pictures; CCE 33 Inferring; and CCE 43 Analysing. This lesson provides recent political cartoons from Australian cartoonists David Pope (from The Canberra Times) and Mark Knight from The Herald Sun. Many are about the Double Dissolution election or the recent census but there are some about the great barrier reef and privatizing medicare. This lesson provides a brief overview of the history of political cartoons in Australia. It reveals how they work and what can be learned from studying them. It revisits the concept satire and defines many of the persuasive / satirical devices they use (e.g. symbolism, caricature, labels, analogy, irony, juxtaposition, and exaggeration). It has a few example analyses and then gives the students questions to ask themselves when analyzing a political cartoon. Students then answer these questions using the cartoons provided (mostly about refugee issues).
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Worksheet - the difference between objective and subjective texts

Worksheet - the difference between objective and subjective texts

This worksheet can be used as a one on one tutoring resource. Alternatively, you can take activities from here to use as fast finishers or homework activities. This document introduces students to key terms like fact, opinion and embellishment. It includes sentences and paragraphs and challenges students to identify whether they are subjective/objective. It also provides some information about zoos and asks students to write a subjective and objective paragraph about the topic. The second section explores how verbs, adverbs and well-constructed, extended noun groups can position the reader to form an opinion or judge a person. It gives an example of a famous Australian and shows how by changing a few words you can change the connotation of the text. It includes comprehension questions to check the students understanding. In the third section, a subjective newspaper article about the Vietnam war is included for students to analyse. There are comprehension questions which follow this. The final section introduces students to the concept of tone and gives them a list of different words to describe the tone of a text. Students then look at an advertisement and have to suggest the tone. Subsequently, they read a bias newspaper article and answer questions about this. Finally, there is a writing activity for students which encourages them to write persuasively.
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Writing Advice - how to write more effectively

Writing Advice - how to write more effectively

This 9-page booklet/resource provides 8 tips to improve your writing. These can be applied to a range of text types including narratives, essays and newspaper articles. Each tip comes with examples, activities or a suggested word bank for students to try to incorporate in their writing going forward.
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Worksheet - Joining words (conjunctions) and adverbs (ideal for NAPLAN or tutoring)

Worksheet - Joining words (conjunctions) and adverbs (ideal for NAPLAN or tutoring)

Do you have students whose writing lacks cohesion because they just can't seem to connect their ideas together? The first half of this resource explains conjunctions and has a table of the different kids which could be printed as a poster for the classroom or given to the students as a handout to consult when drafting their work. Do you have students who don't know the various parts of speech e.g. adverbs? Are you approaching NAPLAN and want a way to save yourself some time while still having a quality resource to use in your classroom? If so, this may be the resource for you. This worksheet can be used as a one on one tutoring resource. Alternatively, you can take activities from here to use as fast finishers or homework activities. You could even put this into a PowerPoint for a NAPLAN preparation lesson. This worksheet includes explanations and examples. It also features a lot of activities to test students understanding of what they have learned. It also includes an extended reading activity (of a news article) at the bottom which challenges students to find all the conjunctions and adverbs in the text and explain the effect these vocabulary choices have on the reader.
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Worksheet - clauses, fragments and sentences (ideal for NAPLAN or literacy tutoring)

Worksheet - clauses, fragments and sentences (ideal for NAPLAN or literacy tutoring)

Do you have students who constantly use fragments (incomplete sentences) in their writing? Do you want a resource that will teach students about clauses, sentences, and fragments so that you have a shared language when it comes to providing feedback at drafting time? If so, this may be the resource for you. This worksheet can be used as a one on one tutoring resource. Alternatively, you can take activities from here to use as fast finishers or homework activities. You could even put this into a PowerPoint for a NAPLAN preparation lesson. The first section of this worksheet includes explanations and examples of: independent, co-ordinant and dependent clauses. It also has a section about embedded clauses and how they can be an effective tool for writers. It also features a lot of activities to test students understanding of what they have learned. The second section of the worksheet looks at the requirements of sentences. It includes examples of the following types of sentence: simple, compound and complex. The information is interspersed with activities to check for understanding. The final section of the worksheet introduces students to fragments and why they are nonsensical and detrimental to your writing. This is followed by a writing activity (students are given a list of key points to turn into a newspaper article). It also includes editing prompts at the end which helps students to refine their initial story.
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Punctuation - commas (ideal for NAPLAN, tutoring and homework tasks)

Punctuation - commas (ideal for NAPLAN, tutoring and homework tasks)

Do you have students who don't know when to use a comma? Do you want a resource that looks at the rules around when to, and when not to, utilise a comma in your writing? If so, this may be the resource for you. This worksheet can be used as a one on one tutoring resource. Alternatively, you can take activities from here to use as fast finishers or homework activities. You could even put this into a PowerPoint for a NAPLAN preparation lesson. This worksheet includes explanations and examples. It also features a lot of activities to test students understanding of what they have learned. Suitable for upper primary and high school students.
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Parts of speech worksheet - Verbs (ideal for NAPLAN or tutoring)

Parts of speech worksheet - Verbs (ideal for NAPLAN or tutoring)

Do you have students who don't know the various parts of speech e.g. nouns, verbs and adjectives? Do you want a resource that looks at explains verbs and tense to your students? If so, this may be the resource for you. This worksheet can be used as a one on one tutoring resource. Alternatively, you can take activities from here to use as fast finishers or homework activities. You could even put this into a PowerPoint for a NAPLAN preparation lesson. This worksheet includes explanations and examples. It also features a lot of activities to test students understanding of what they have learned.
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Religion: An introduction to the Catholic Social Teachings

Religion: An introduction to the Catholic Social Teachings

A PowerPoint designed for a year 9 Theology unit on Social Justice. It introduces students to each of the Catholic Social Teachings (What they are and how they can be upheld). This can be a useful starting point for discussion of students own values or can be used to then encourage students to identify scripture which supports each of these CST's.
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Religion: Catholicism: The eight beatitudes & the ten commandments

Religion: Catholicism: The eight beatitudes & the ten commandments

This PowerPoint was designed for use in an Australian Catholic School as part of a year 9 theology unit. It introduces students to the eight beatitudes of Jesus & the ten commandments. The PowerPoint includes activities where the students consider the relevance of these and how they relate to their own lives. It also includes links to YouTube clips which further explain these concepts and a research activity where students compare these to the articles in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
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Religion: How Caritas Australia helps to achieve social justice

Religion: How Caritas Australia helps to achieve social justice

Two PowerPoints designed for a 9 religion unit about Social Justice and how Catholic organisations contribute to the betterment of society. 1) A PowerPoint introducing the organisation 'Caritas Australia' including their mission and values. It includes an inquiry activity which requires students to go to the Caritas website to learn more for themselves. 2) A PowerPoint looking at three of the countries Caritas assisted and how they did so (Australia, Sri Lanka and the Solomon Islands). It includes videos from the 2014 Project Compassion campaign and viewing questions for students to answer after watching each clip.
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Religion: Assessment for a 9 Theology Inquiry Based Learning unit on the importance of lay people

Religion: Assessment for a 9 Theology Inquiry Based Learning unit on the importance of lay people

Three resources designed for a year 9 theology unit where students interview lay people from various churches in their hometown to develop an understanding of the role of the laity within each church. According to the curriculum they must "examine ways in which believers live their Christian vocation, and distinguish between their participation in the priestly, prophetic and kingly work of Jesus Christ." !) Task sheet for their summative assessment item (an ethnographic study.) An ethnographic study is a method of investigation that studies the culture of a society using research as well as field reporting techniques like interviewing. Their findings will be presented in a report format. 2) A booklet to guide students through their ethnographic study (including developing appropriate questions, researching Jesus' values and actions, researching each church prior to the interviews etc.) It also includes a retrieval chart for students to record the answers to their interview questions into & an explanation of how students should set out their report and what should be in it. 3) A report template for the students to write their final report into.
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Religion: Unit Plan for a 9 Theology Inquiry Based Learning unit on the importance of lay people

Religion: Unit Plan for a 9 Theology Inquiry Based Learning unit on the importance of lay people

A unit designed in an Australian Catholic school which could be easily modified for other contexts. The unit entitled 'Walking in Christ's Footsteps' poses two big questions to students - Do people in my community walk in Christ’s footsteps? Why should I walk in Jesus Christ’s footsteps? It then outlines the learning activities which will occur. The unit has been designed to follow the TELSTAR method of inquiry and has drawn on a range of recommended Inquiry Based Learning pedagogy. It has been designed to be as interactive as possible. Within the unit students will explores how Jesus lived on Earth and the examples he left for us. They will learn how lay people from various Christian churches within their local community walk in Christ’s footsteps (aka live their Christian vocation. They will discover why we have the sacraments of initiation (baptism, confirmation and the eucharist.) They will see how Christians serve Christ through worship and prayer but also through charity (living his mission by serving other people and speaking out against social injustices.) Their final assessment is to interview lay people from a range of churches in their local area and write a report to demonstrate their findings.
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Religion: Introduction to Inquiry Based Learning Social Justice Unit

Religion: Introduction to Inquiry Based Learning Social Justice Unit

Three resources used in a 9 Theology unit on social justice and the work of laypeople. 1) a PowerPoint introducing students to Inquiry Based Learning. It includes the two big questions of the unit (aka fertile questions). Students to complete a KWL chart before learning to develop sub questions to answer the two big questions. It then talks students through a process that they can use to begin finding answers to these questions. It includes an explanation of BOOLEAN search practices which can be used when researching online to produce more relevant results. 2) A list of prayers required to be taught throughout the year (grade 9) 3) A table which explains the various steps of TELSTAR (the structure used for this Inquiry unit)
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Religion: The gifts and fruits of the holy spirit

Religion: The gifts and fruits of the holy spirit

The Key Focuses of the unit are teaching students about: ○ Christian vocation: working for Christ (living his mission by serving other people.) ○ Seven sacraments esp. Baptism and confirmation ○ Gifts of the Holy spirit (character traits) ○ Serving Christ through worship and prayer (through communion & Eucharist) ○ doing God’s work when we speak out against injustice (CSTs) ○ Human dignity ○ Authentic freedom This is a PowerPoint designed to teach students about the Gifts of the Holy spirit. It begins with a film explaining why we are baptised as at Baptism, we receive seven special gifts from the Holy Spirit. These gifts help us to make good choices, and to serve God and others. Subsequently the PowerPoint goes through each of these gifts. The presentation also includes information about the twelve fruits of the Holy Spirit and a journal writing activity to finish off the lesson.
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Autobiography 'Slave' - History of Sudan

Autobiography 'Slave' - History of Sudan

6 resources utilised in a 12 English Authority unit in Queensland Australia. 1) A PowerPoint taking students through the history of Sudan. It begins by introducing students to key terms including: coup, constitution, fundamentalist, Islam, junta and secession. These terms are integral to understanding the events in Slave as the author's life was influenced by the political events occurring in society at the time. After a brief overview of the early history, it delves into the civil war (1980s-1990s). Lastly it looks at contemporary politics (since 2002). 2) A handout of the notes about the history of Sudan (which were taken from the Oxford dictionary of contemporary world history). This can be given to students who struggle to summarise or used for purposes of revision. 3) Further research about Slave and the Nuba culture. 4) A handout to be given to students at the beginning of the term explaining the purpose of the unit and outlining what the two items of assessment are. 5) A diagram which shows the various influences on the author as she wrote her autobiography.
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The Hunger Games - chapter summary for chapters 1 - 8

The Hunger Games - chapter summary for chapters 1 - 8

A resource taken from an Australian 10 English Unit entitled 'Contemporary literature.' In this unit students compare and contrast the social, moral and ethical themes in a range of contemporary literature texts, including films and the close study of a novel. Students evaluate how text structures, language and visual features can be used to influence audience response. This PowerPoint provides a dot point summary of these chapters and is followed by chapter questions which could have been set for homework or could be used within the lesson to check for student understanding. I have added one YouTube clip showing a relevant scene but you could add more if your learners prefer the broadcast strategy.
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The Hunger Games: Social issues in the news

The Hunger Games: Social issues in the news

Prior to students learning about moral issues in The Hunger Games, they must first learn what morals are and have a chance to identify them in other texts. This PowerPoint teaches students what terms including moral, morality and immoral mean. Students are also introduced to the news genre and its purpose. They learn about how regular news stories are structured and their common language before reading a news story with a moral issue in it. After reading the article there are a series of comprehension questions which could be answered individually or as a class depending on the abilities of your learners. These questions increase in difficulty and were written using verbs from Bloom's taxonomy. Resource 2: A copy of the newspaper article students explored in this lesson (taken from an Australian newspaper in 2017).
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The Hunger Games: How the moral issue lying is shown in the text

The Hunger Games: How the moral issue lying is shown in the text

Resource 1: PowerPoint This lesson introduces the concept of lying broadly before zooming in to focus on how the moral issue is shown in the novel. Students are introduced to the types of lie (white lie, fabrication, bold faced lies). Discussion questions are posed on the PowerPoint to encourage students to share their views on the issue. There is a short clip from the film Liar Liar to provide a humorous stimulus for discussion. Following this students will read the feature article 'Are white lies dead in the age of social media?' As they read the various language and visual features will be pointed out to them (as they will be writing a feature article for their mid term assessment). After reading the article there are activities for students to complete including defining some terms from the article and answering literal, inferred and applied level comprehension questions. Subsequently, the lesson introduces the various types of lies in the novel. The PPT includes extracts from the text where people are shown discussing lying or telling a lie. These extracts are followed by discussion/comprehension questions. Resource 2: a feature article taken from 'The Australian' (newspaper) in 2017 about white lies which students will explore in this lesson.
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The Hunger Games: Unit Introduction

The Hunger Games: Unit Introduction

Three resources made for a year 10 English class in Australia. Resource 1: Spelling list (24 words per week, 6 weeks worth of words). Resource 2: blank glossary table for students to add their definitions and example sentences into. Resource 3: A PowerPoint introducing students to the text they will be studying (the first novel in the trilogy). The presentation includes a brief synopsis of the novel and what inspired the author to write the novel. Reviewing expectations for reading the novel and the homework students will be completing. It outlines what students need to know to successfully complete their two assessment items for this unit.
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The Hunger Games: Moral issues - Inequality and murder

The Hunger Games: Moral issues - Inequality and murder

One PowerPoint taken from a year 10 English unit taught in an Australian school. This PowerPoint is comprehensive and could be used over a few lessons. Within the unit Students compare and contrast the social, moral and ethical themes in the novel 'The Hunger Games.' Students are being prepared to evaluate how text structures and language features can be used to influence audience response. This presentation focuses on two moral issues within the text: Inequality and murder. It begins with a definition of inequality and listing the various types of inequality. This is followed by a YouTube video (a vox pop about Inequality in America) to clarify student's understandings of these issues. Subsequently, students are introduced to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and some of the important articles within this document. Students watch a clip from the second film and must identify which of those rights are being violated in the text. Information is provided contrasting life in District 12 with life in The Capitol. Extracts are provided for students to analyse to see how Collins constructs this inequality through her use of language devices. Different examples of inequality within the novel are provided. Reflection questions are provided at the end of this section for students to demonstrate what they have learned. In the murder section students are introduced to the terms murder and manslaughter and the differences between these crimes. Discussion questions are provided to get students to share their views on this issue. The PowerPoint then looks into the Christian perspective on murder focusing on scripture including one of the ten commandments. Following this the focus turns to killing within The Hunger Games and the various characters attitudes towards this. Film clips, quotes or summaries of each time Katniss kills in the games are provided.
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Autobiography 'Slave': Short story transformation assessment

Autobiography 'Slave': Short story transformation assessment

6 resources used to scaffold a short story assessment task for a year 12 authority English class in Queensland Australia. 1) the task sheet explaining task requirements and the marking rubric. 2) A PowerPoint further explaining the task. It also reviews the major elements of a narrative including:  plot (aka the structure), setting, characterisation, language devices and the types of narrator. 3) a worksheet of planning steps the students should use prior to writing to ensure they have addressed all elements of the task. 4 & 5) two example assessments to go through with students to further exemplify the genre conventions they should be using. 6) A peer review activity for students to complete prior to submitting their draft.
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Autobiography 'Slave' - Chapter questions and vocabulary list

Autobiography 'Slave' - Chapter questions and vocabulary list

These are the homework resources for a year 12 Authority English unit delivered in Queensland, Australia. The focus for this unit is the comprehensive study of a text that explores a different culture (the autobiography Slave by Mende Nazer). Through examining the autobiographies underlying ideologies and themes, students will be exposed to social and cultural experiences that are far removed from their own. In particular, students will explore the controversial and confrontational issues privileged in the selected text. Engaging with a culturally rich text will allow students to develop empathy and connect other cultural experiences with their own lived experience. Resource 1: List of vocabulary (spelling words) for the term - students are to learn 24 words per week. Resource 2: List of terms that students should know by the end of year 12 which can be used as extension for gifted students. Resource 3: A list of comprehension questions written to assess students knowledge of each chapter of the autobiography. This is a good tool for consolidating knowledge and will be useful revision when they need to develop an idea for their assessment tasks.
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