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Common factors and multiples

  • Year group: Year 6
  • Term: Autumn
  • Topic: Factors, multiples and primes
  • Duration: 1 weeks
  • Keystage: KS2
  • Age Range: 10 to 11 yrs
  • Unit can be taught out of sequence: N
  • Week Range: 7

In this chapter, pupils identify common multiples and continue to identify common factors and prime numbers.

Pupils continue to work with prime numbers and, in doing so, use language such as “prime” and “composite”.

Additionally, they identify common factors and multiples and talk about them using vocabulary such as “factor”, “common factor”, “multiple” and “common multiple”. Pupils illustrate these concepts using objects and diagrams (eg, an array model). They also use their knowledge in other areas of the mathematics curriculum (eg, to find equal denominators when adding and subtracting fractions).

 Download all factors, multiples and primes chapters as a PDF 

Resources for this topic

White Rose Maths

Number problems

A set of number problems including factors, primes, odd, even and square numbers.
By WRMaths

Factors and multiples

Direct link to our Y6 scheme.
By WRMaths

Mathematics Mastery

Common factors and multiples

Select ‘View more’ for an accompanying video.

Enabling teachers to continuously develop their practice is a key element of the Mathematics Mastery Programme.

This CPD video provides step-by-step guidance on common factors and multiples.
Our videos aim to:

• Model teaching tips, techniques and clarify how to make connections between concrete, pictorial and abstract representations
• Support the teaching of different methods and concepts, rather than focusing on one method only
• Enhance subject knowledge and support non-specialists

Like what you see?

Mathematics Mastery is a professional development programme for teachers with a mission to transform mathematics education in the UK.

This task is just a taster of the complete classroom resources we offer. We also provide in-depth development training, online CPD, specialist support and assessment tools.

We believe all elements of our programme are vital in creating lasting change – enabling every child to enjoy and succeed in mathematics.

Want to find out more? Check out our free resources and blogs or join an information session.

By Mathematics Mastery

Common factors and multiples

Enabling pupils to develop their mathematical reasoning skills through independent work is a key element of the Mathematics Mastery programme.

This activity explores the concept of common factors and multiples.

• Pupils should complete these tasks using concrete manipulatives as part of the CPA approach
• Pupils should be encouraged to explain their working in full sentences
• These tasks may be adapted with pupils working in pairs to encourage mathematical discussion

Like what you see? Mathematics Mastery is a professional development programme for teachers with a mission to transform mathematics education in the UK.

This task is just a taster of the complete classroom resources we offer. We also provide in-depth development training, online CPD, specialist support and assessment tools.

We believe all elements of our programme are vital in creating lasting change – enabling every child to enjoy and succeed in mathematics.

Want to find out more? Check out our free resources and blogs or join an information session.
By Mathematics Mastery

Resources shared by teachers

Multiples (LCM) and Factors (HCF)

This is a step by step guide, first through multiples and factors before going onto comparing two or more numbers. I use 'factor bugs' as I found that this suits students who particularly forget what a 'factor' is, as it is a way of working out factors of a number visually. You will have to draw the factor bugs legs. There are notes in the footnote of the slide. There are activities for the students to complete.

Thank you to other TES members who also share.
By Lisa H

Finding Factors and Highest Common Factor

I made this for a group who didn't get on with looking for divisibility and need very clear instructions. In each box they find all the multiplications which have the answer at the top, then list the factors at the bottom. This makes it simple to find the highest common factor.
By Kimberley Jane Anderson