High School Research and essay skills lesson plans and activities

Resources and ideas for Research and essay skills, written by teachers to support teaching and learning

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AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1

AQA GCSE English Language Paper 1

A complete 12 week scheme of work that is fully resourced and differentiated. Contains powerpoint lessons, medium term plan, text extracts and sample practice papers. Everything you need to teach the new GCSE English Language Paper 1. Also contains revision activities for GCSE Literature Paper 1 (easily adapted to suit your texts.)

By stebbingk05

Library Challenge Cards

Library Challenge Cards

These ‘Library Challenge’ cards were made for my class library, but they could be used in a school library as well. The idea was just to get the children excited about reading and properly engaged with the books, and they’ve really enjoyed working through the activities – an added bonus being that I use this work to decorate the walls of our library. There’s a selection of 10 Library Challenge Cards, plus a ‘Library Challenge of the Week’ which just allows for changing things up a little without having to print and laminate more cards.

By sh2810

Greek Myths: Echo and Narcissus

Greek Myths: Echo and Narcissus

This interesting and highly-stimulating lesson enables students to gain a clear and understanding of the key meanings in the Greek Myth ‘Echo and Narcissus.’ Through engagement with the story, students learn to interpret and infer the key meanings in the text, understand its predominant morals, and back up their ideas with textual evidence.The lesson follows a clear, logical, bite-size learning journey, which guides students towards differentiated learning objectives. Over the course of this journey, they become able to:- Define the key term 'moral' and identify the morals in popular tales;- Read the story 'Echo and Narcissus' and interpret the key meanings;- Identify, explain, and analyse the moral of the story in 'Echo and Narcissus';- Engage deeply with the text by inferring the thoughts and feelings of the key characters; - Test their understanding of the story by answering an exam-style comprehension question.-Peer assess each other's learning attempts.This resource pack includes:- A visually engaging whole-lesson PowerPoint presentation;;- Paper copies and online links to the extract needed for the lesson (end section of Act Two);- Greek Myths Definitions Cards;- Greek Myths worksheet (including answer sheet for teachers);- A logically scaffolded essay template;- A detailed lesson plan, complete with what the teacher and students should aim to achieve at each stage of the lesson.All images are licensed for commercial use, and are cited on the final slide of the PowerPoint.

By TandLGuru

Charge of the Light Brigade - Power & Conflict- AQA Literature Poetry New Spec 2017

Charge of the Light Brigade - Power & Conflict- AQA Literature Poetry New Spec 2017

A lesson that explores the poem Charge of the Light Brigade by Alfred, Lord TennysonThe learning journey is linked to the AQA assessment objectives and develops students' analytical skills.The lesson comprises of: Starter activity linked to the idea of warLinks to video clips to enhance understandingA first impression grid for students to useModelled annotations with questions to scaffold annotationContextual informationA sample essay question with success criteria linked to AO'sA modelled paragraph This lesson is planned for a year 10 middle/high ability group and can be easily differentiated to suit the personalised needs of your students. Yellow lightbulbs on slides mark out stretch and challenge questions that have been included. 22 slides. All additional resources are embedded within the PPT.

By F-J-O

The Haunting Horror Story Creative Writing

The Haunting Horror Story Creative Writing

The Haunting Horror Story Creative WritingA group of friends find themselves trapped in an old hotel, only to suffer strange lucid dreams and terrifying nightly visitations. Will they escape or go insane? And what is the significance of the black rose?Visually attractive, creative horror story lesson complete with all resources needed for a fun engaging lesson or series of lessons. (At least two lessons will be required to complete the story.)Power point includes:* Attractive title page.* Story scenario – dramatic scenario (as above).* Complete lesson objectives and outcomes* Character cards page (with example, included) where students complete their own characters on special cards (resources included at the back of the Power Point.)* Planning sheet giving students a structured method in which to write an effective story (included at the back of the Power Point.)* A review prompt to discuss writing so far.* A review peer-assessment prompt which should set students up to continue the story next lesson.A simple but fun and engaging lesson!Visit my shop for more great lessons and resources:https://www.tes.com/teaching-resources/shop/EngageinEnglish(Credits: Donney Nunley, Circus Tricks, Flickr.com. Emo Attitude, Haunted Boy, Deviant art.)

By EngageinEnglish

Structuring Analytical Essays - Writing Frames

Structuring Analytical Essays - Writing Frames

Targeted at KS3 and KS4 pupils for the reading assessments, the resources provide pupils with a guided structure (with arrows) about how they can build a convincing analytical argument. The structure is modeled and pupils are given opportunities to follow the structure and analyse alternative extracts independently for the entire lesson. This works great in group work and independent tasks that lead to presentations. Distinguished by arrows and boxes, the pupils explore how each sentence provides a different purpose. Each box includes a separate statement; in following each box, pupils begin to realize how their sentences move from the topic sentence to evidence, to analysis then the reader's response and concluding the writer's intentions. The analytical structure is adaptable to different texts and provides a great scaffold for all analytical writing tasks.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Frankenstein - Character Map

Frankenstein - Character Map

Frankenstein - Character MapThis resource is a great way to get students to gather the key information of the characters from the story. I have made this map to be printed up to any size and can be used time and time again as a helpful resource. Works well in A3 and has been used by other English teachers. For more creative ideas see my shop: @captionteseducationAlternatively contact me via my weblink if you have anything you would like me to make.All images are original vector images drawn by myself. ©2017 WTB

By captionteseducation

Mametz Wood Poem Comparison (WJEC EDUQAS focused)

Mametz Wood Poem Comparison (WJEC EDUQAS focused)

A resource created for my low ability year 11s. I go through Mametz Wood in some detail, as a revision exercise, as they have annotated and been taught this poem before.The process of responding is broken down and I have used images to direct students to the 4 most horrific images in the poem.By scaffolding and modelling the first poem, the second poem is for students to have a go themselves. It worked really well!

By AimeeWoonton

Peter Pan - 4 week Study Book (Chapters 1, 2, 3 and 5)

Peter Pan - 4 week Study Book (Chapters 1, 2, 3 and 5)

A study book filled with activities covering chapters 1, 2, 3 and 5 of Peter Pan. The tasks are designed around building the learner's inference skills and ability to construct well developed answers. It is also a good way to introduce learners to a classic text without the writing being too overwhelming. There are a couple of tasks designed to familiarise the students with the language used.Each task is given an extension for the more able. Though the book is designed towards year 7s, it has been used with high ability year 6s.

By AdamDuffield

AQA Language Paper 1

AQA Language Paper 1

AQA Language Paper 176 page revision/ work bookletCovers section A and BBreaks down each questionPractice tasks and exam style questions

By Elocin123

Macbeth GCSE WJEC Preparation

Macbeth GCSE WJEC Preparation

This bundle includes:A Macbeth introduction booklet (made with AQA in mind, and includes their mark schemes, but generic for any board)Some Macbeth extracts, activities and exam questions.

By AimeeWoonton

Harry Potter Comprehension

Harry Potter Comprehension

An activity to revise and test students understanding of a story. Using Harry Potter allows the students to connect to a well known text. ***The extract used is copyright of the author J.K Rowling.

By Sazo123

Suspense Writing: Full Writing Scheme of Work

Suspense Writing: Full Writing Scheme of Work

This scheme takes the group step by step through the stages of how to write a story. It is adapted from the government initiative 'Improving Childrens Writing' getting children from level 3 to level 4. I have changed it a little, so that it is also suitable for level 2 and 3 as well. Some resources you will have to get from the government published folder 'improving childrens writing'.

By asadler79

The Victorians - Votes for Women - historical debate and investigation

The Victorians - Votes for Women - historical debate and investigation

Drawing on the new History Curriculum and focussing on Aims: Strands 4 and 5 this resource includes: A collection of nine quotes from contemporary sources, An explanation of five activities that can be carried out using these resources Planning Templates to support arguments and a chart to help summarise arguments about the campaign for votes for women. Learning Objectives:• To understand historical concepts such as continuity and change, cause and consequence, similarity, difference and significance, • To make connections, draw contrasts, analyse trends, frame historically-valid questions and create their own structured accounts, including written narratives and analyses • To understand the methods of historical enquiry, including how evidence is used rigorously to make historical claims, and discern how and why contrasting arguments and interpretations of the past have been constructed.Learning Outcomes: Pupils will be able to: • recognise and discern between arguments made for and against allowing women the vote. • draw on primary resources to produce a reasoned debate on the pros and cons of allowing women the vote. • produce their own persuasive argument in favour (or against) allowing women the vote. • produce a balanced argument on the advantages and disadvantages of allowing women the vote. • Produce their own written narrative about the campaign for women to be allowed to vote.

By MikeRichards

WJEC GCSE English Language Reading exam SOW, Lessons and Lecturer podcasts (Unit 1)

WJEC GCSE English Language Reading exam SOW, Lessons and Lecturer podcasts (Unit 1)

A huge number of PowerPoints (over 30) on the WJEC GCSE Reading exam (Unit 1). All PowerPoints have a lecturer podcast with it. There are lessons and videos on the following questions:Information retrievalThe 'HOW' questionThe 'THOUGHTS and FEELINGS' questionThe 'IMPRESSIONS' questionThe 'COMPARE AND CONTRAST' question Advice on an unexpected question.This is not for the 9-1 exam.

By SteveNoyce1

Analytical Writing Frame Julius Caesar

Analytical Writing Frame Julius Caesar

Targeted at KS3 and KS4 pupils learning Julius Caesar, the resources provide pupils with a guided structure (with arrows) about how they can build a convincing analytical argument. The structure is modeled and pupils are given opportunities to follow the structure and analyse alternative extracts independently for the entire lesson. This works great in group work and independent tasks that lead to presentations. Distinguished by arrows and boxes, the pupils explore how each sentence provides a different purpose. Each box includes a separate statement; in following each box, pupils begin to realize how their sentences move from the topic sentence to evidence, to analysis then the reader's response and concluding the writer's intentions. The analytical structure is adaptable to different texts and provides a great scaffold for all analytical writing tasks.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Structuring Analytical Writing Great Expectations

Structuring Analytical Writing Great Expectations

Targeted at KS3 and KS4 pupils learning Great Expectations the resources provide pupils with a guided structure (with arrows) about how they can build a convincing analytical argument. The structure is modeled and pupils are given opportunities to follow the structure and analyse alternative extracts independently for the entire lesson. This works great in group work and independent tasks that lead to presentations. Distinguished by arrows and boxes, the pupils explore how each sentence provides a different purpose. Each box includes a separate statement; in following each box, pupils begin to realize how their sentences move from the topic sentence to evidence, to analysis then the reader's response and concluding the writer's intentions. The analytical structure is adaptable to different texts and provides a great scaffold for all analytical writing tasks.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Structuring Analytical Writing A Midsummer Night's Dream

Structuring Analytical Writing A Midsummer Night's Dream

Targeted at KS3 and KS4 pupils learning A Midsummer Night's Dream, the resources provide pupils with a guided structure (with arrows) about how they can build a convincing analytical argument. The structure is modeled and pupils are given opportunities to follow the structure and analyse alternative extracts independently for the entire lesson. This works great in group work and independent tasks that lead to presentations. Distinguished by arrows and boxes, the pupils explore how each sentence provides a different purpose. Each box includes a separate statement; in following each box, pupils begin to realize how their sentences move from the topic sentence to evidence, to analysis then the reader's response and concluding the writer's intentions. The analytical structure is adaptable to different texts and provides a great scaffold for all analytical writing tasks.

By deepavali_sehgal1

TOP TRUMPS - Biographies of world leaders past and present.

TOP TRUMPS - Biographies of world leaders past and present.

How does Donald Trump compare with Mother Teresa or Abraham Lincoln? Your students can find out with these versatile biography cards.Firstly, they will test your students’ reading skills.Secondly, they will enable them to structure and write biographies of their own.Thirdly, they provide a platform for you as a teacher to critically evaluate your students’ writing with feedback which they will find engaging; encouraging them to write to their very best ability.Fourthly, they provide an insight into Donald Trump’s top team; US presidents of the past; prominent world leaders of today; and influential leaders through history.Fifthly, as a game, this will be a tremendous amount of fun!++++THE BIOGRAPHY CARDS ARE SPLIT INTO FOUR SECTIONS:Trump's Team Trump, Preibus, Spicer, Devos, Conway, Tillerson, Pence, Mattis.US Presidents Obama, Bush, Clinton, Reagan, Kennedy, Nixon, Lincoln, Roosevelt.World Leaders 2017 May, Nieto, Netanyahu, Putin, Trudeau, Merkel, Jong-un, RouhaniWorld Leaders 2017 Mandela, Malala, Mother Teresa, Luther King Jr., Ghandi, Queen Victoria, Princess Diana, Peron.++++HERE ARE SOME IDEAS FOR HOW THE BIOGRAPHY CARDS CAN BE USED:Reading skillsEach biography comes with three questions.RETRIEVE: Students will find this answer in the text.REVIEW: They will need to use summarising skills to answer the questions. Answers can be quoted from the text. The question will make this clear.RESEARCH: Students can use the internet to answer a question. The information cannot be found within the text.Compare and contrastStudents can take any two cards. Their task is to find three differences and three similarities about the characters they have chosen.Highlight the textReferring to the scores under each image, students can colour code the text that applies to each category with a highlighter or coloured crayon.Change the scoresYour students may disagree with the score their character has been given. Allow them to discuss and debate this in class, or with a group. They can then create their own scores in the ‘Write your own scores’ section.They can also colour code, as on the previous activity.Write your own biographiesAsk your students to look at the biographies. What features do they notice? They will hopefully point out that they are written in past tense and third person; chronological order; and summarise major events in a person’s life, often with years.Provide them with a blank template and ask them to complete the biography using the ones they have studied. Ask them to find out relevant information from secondary sources, such as the internet or in books.

By Richardtownend1978

AQA Paper 2 Practice

AQA Paper 2 Practice

A fully resourced lesson for KS3/KS4 students to practise a Section B question and mark their own work using a student-friendly version of AO5 and AO6 mark scheme for AQA English Language Paper 2: Writers' Viewpoints and Perspectives.

By Lead_Practitioner

Jason and the Argonauts

Jason and the Argonauts

Four items to use with the film JASON AND THE ARGONAUTS1. Assessment task with exemplar film review2.Comprehension handout3. Crossword handout4. Word search handout

By jaynorth

Structuring introductions - Julius Caesar

Structuring introductions - Julius Caesar

Targeted at mixed ability KS3 pupils, this colour differentiated model answer demonstrates the elements that constitute a well-developed introduction for reading assessments. The sentences are differentiated by colour and pupils are encouraged to identify the purpose of each sentence from the checklist. In matching the sentence to its purpose (e.g. link to context), pupils begin to identify the elements of effective introductions and become more critical as they write their own introduction.

By deepavali_sehgal1

Great Expectations Sarah Pocket

Great Expectations Sarah Pocket

Targeted at mixed ability Year 10 and 11 classes, this PowerPoint embeds relevant model and assessments that explore how Dickens uses Sarah as a vehicle to criticise how excessive wealth often distracted society from their family responsibilities and values. The lesson embeds an intellectually stimulating issue of debate that encourages pupils to question the role of parents - a discussion that facilitates their understanding into Victorian attitudes towards parenthood.

By deepavali_sehgal1