High School history lesson plans and activities: Thematic and breadth studies

Resources and ideas for history, thematic and breadth studies, written by teachers to support teaching and learning

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Slave Triangle

Slave Triangle

This is a complete lesson exploring the Slave Trade triangle. It includes a map task, have and need task, card sort on the reasons slavery was justified and visual questioning task

By leighbee23

Nazi Propaganda

Nazi Propaganda

Nazi Germany lesson analysing Nazi propaganda, includes a detailed worksheet and a paired task exploring forms of propaganda the Nazi party used. This can be used to link to how propaganda helped the Nazis maintain control.Also includes a task discussing the features of propaganda posters on the powerpoint to go through with the whole class and then an activity worksheet to facilitate the development of this independently This resource has been adapted since earlier reviews

By leighbee23

Roman army

Roman army

A series of three lessons on the Roman Army- based on recruitment and why the army was successful. Includes three tasks labelling, card sort, spy task, recruitment advert task.Lots of high quality resources for KS2 and KS3 students

By leighbee23

Marking Stickers to Encourage Feedback - 23 Template Bundle

Marking Stickers to Encourage Feedback - 23 Template Bundle

Has that pile of books been sitting on your desk for over a week? Why not print out some stickers and get sticking! I use a range of stickers to encourage student feedback. It's an excellent way to save some time but also encourage a dialogue. Credit to A. Wilkes for inspiration. You will require various label size papers but there are some standard envelope ones. Sticker sizes include: standard address label, 25x25, 64x64 and others. Comments are appreciated. This paper can be purchased online and put into any printer. Comments are appreciated. Images are taken from Microsoft Office Clip-Art collections and used in line with MS policy.

By maxblackburn

Kennedy Assassination- Student Essay Assignment

Kennedy Assassination- Student Essay Assignment

Kennedy Assassination- Student Essay Assignment (DBQ is listed as another resource in my store)Directions: After you have completed JFK Assassination Documents. Meaning you have1. read the documents2. highlight questionably evidence in the documents3. Create a theory as to what the document is suggesting and who killed JFK- One for each document4. Write 300+ word document/ PowerPoint or poster- summary as to who they believe killed JFK- citing evidence from the documents (this can be typed or hand written)(You are allowed to work with a group up to three people)Use the guide to help you write your document1. Intro: Your main thesis: Do you believe JFK assassination was or was not a conspiracy? Background on the issue, your thesis statement Give at least three reasons why (tell what your body paragraphs will be about)This should be 3-16 sentences. Student Example broken down, but yours should be in paragraph format. (You CANNOT COPY THIS)Background: On January 20, 1961 at approximately 12:30 pm in Dallas, Texas the Nation was shocked with the death of thirty-fifth President John F. Kennedy. Kennedy he was riding in a Lincoln Continental four-door convertible. The car was completely open at the top (the car, code-named X-100). It had no armor or bulletproof elements whatsoever, the tires were not bulletproof, there was no bulletproof glass, it did have a removable plastic top, but, again, it was just Plexiglas. Riding inside the car with President Kennedy was Jackie Kennedy, Texas Governor John Connelly, his wife, Nellie, and two secret service agents. As enthusiastic crowds cheered them on, Connelly’s wife turned to Kennedy and said, “Mr. President, you can't say Dallas doesn't love you.” Just seconds later, shots rang out from what was “Said” to be the sixth floor of the Texas School Book Depository Building, fatally wounded JFK, sending a nation into mourning and triggering ...

By Linni0011

Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911: Revision & AFL Pack for OCR GCSE Modern World History

Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911: Revision & AFL Pack for OCR GCSE Modern World History

This outstanding resource has been finely tuned for over 10 years and used to deliver many outstanding lessons right across my faculty. It has been so successful that it has attracted the attention of Hodder, Pearsons, Boardworks and Heinemann who have asked me to produce similar online resources for their text books.Each section of this booklet on the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911, includes revision notes, review sheets, activities, past paper questions and pupil mark schemes on the following sub topics of the OCR GCSE Modern World Specification from 2013:Structure of Edwardian SocietyPoverty & Lassie FaireWhy did Poverty become a political issue?The Social ReformersWhy did the Liberals win a landslide victory in 1906?Why did the Liberals Introduce their reforms?The Liberal ReformsOpposition to the Liberal ReformsHow Effective were the Liberal Reforms?I would recommend printing this resource in a saddle stitch format on A3 paper if your reprographics person can do it.Importantly for everyone studying this topic, this resource includes a detailed section on 'Why did the Liberals win a landslide victory in 1906?' which is not covered in the official text books but is on the new 2013 specification.After reviewing each section, I would recommend that students complete the relevant past paper questions, swap and mark each others work using the pupil mark scheme and then improve their answers for homework.If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want.Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates.Kind RegardsRoy

By Roy_Huggins

Writing Frame: Why did the Liberals introduce their reforms 1906 - 1911? + Card Sort

Writing Frame: Why did the Liberals introduce their reforms 1906 - 1911? + Card Sort

This great resource is designed to be used as a writing frame to help support middle and lower ability students scaffold an extended answer or essay on why did the Liberals introduce their reforms 1906 - 1911.The first resource is a card sort which has four heading cards labelled social reformers, political rivalry, new liberalism and national efficiency, as well as 16 statement / information cards to be correct sorted under them. The second resource includes a writing frame on page 1 with the same headings set out using the PEE guide - Point - Example Explain. This page should ideally be printed on A3 paper for SEN students. The second page includes a thinking skills review triangle activity to help your students plan their conclusion and decide which was the most important factor.The aims and objectives for this lesson are:Theme: The Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911Know: What reforms did the Liberals introduce 1906 - 1911?Understand: How successful was each reform at helping different groups in society?Evaluate: How successful were the Liberal Reforms at solving the problems facing working people?WILF - What Am I Looking For?Identify & describe: The reforms introduced by the Liberals 1906 - 1911?Explain: How successful was each reform at helping different groups in society?Analyse: How successful were the Liberal Reforms at improving the lives of working people?This resource is provided in Microsoft Word format so it can be easily tailored to suit the needs of your students. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want.Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates.Kind RegardsRoy

By Roy_Huggins

Assessment Pack: OCR Modern World History - Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911

Assessment Pack: OCR Modern World History - Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911

This great resource includes all the past paper questions from previous OCR exam questions, updated for the new specification from 2013. These are set out so that students can conveniently write in the booklet and refer directly to the sources. At the back of the booklet, I've included some student mark schemes which can be used either in the classroom or independently to help students grade their work and improve their answers. Each mark scheme also includes a guide on how to write an A* answer for each type of question.If you would like to purchase a revision guide to go with this resource, I have uploaded one separately or you can buy them together. They are listed as AFL & Revision Guide for the Liberal Reforms.If you like this type resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want.Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates.Kind RegardsRoy

By Roy_Huggins

Diamond 9 Activity: Why did the Liberals introduce their reforms 1906 - 1911?

Diamond 9 Activity: Why did the Liberals introduce their reforms 1906 - 1911?

This great resource makes an excellent starter, plenary or revision activity for teaching the introduction to the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911. Its aimed primarily at middle to upper ability students as a thinking skills activity, although with support lower ability students could easily access this task . If you would like something more suitable for middle and lower ability then you could always download my card sort, which provides students with headings such as New Liberalism, political rivalry, national efficiency and social reformers. The resource includes nine diamond cards. Each card includes a statements explaining why the Liberals introduced their reforms. Students a asked to do the following tasks:1. Remove any reasons that you don’t think are important. 2. Arrange the remaining diamonds to show any links that you can find between the different reasons. 3. Make a smaller diamond shape using the four most important reasons to explain why the Liberals introduced their reforms. At each stage students expected to record their answer and explain their choices. The aims and objectives for this lesson are: Theme: How successful were the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911? Know: Why did the Liberals introduced their reforms? Understand: What roles did social reformers, national efficiency, political rivalry and new liberalism play influencing their decision? Evaluate: which factors were the most important? WILF: What Am I Looking For? Identify & Describe: Why did the Liberals introduce their reforms? Understand: What roles did the social reformers, national efficiency, political rivalry and new liberalism play? Analyse: Which factors were the most important? If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want. Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates. Kind Regards Roy

By Roy_Huggins

Around the World Mini Bundle

Around the World Mini Bundle

A selection of resources that are aimed at sparking your students' interest in the world around them. They help you to explore the world from your classroom! These presentations include interesting facts and photos about food, landmarks, houses and children from Africa, Asia, Europe, North and South America and Australiasia.

By cassieborodenko

Card Sort: How successful were the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911?

Card Sort: How successful were the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911?

This excellent resource can be used as a starter, plenary or revision activity for students studying the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911. It is suitable for the full range of ability as it contains both simple and challenging statements to provide both support and stretch and challenge. I have used this resource to teach the Liberal Reforms through both GCSE Modern World History and Medicine Through Time.The resource includes two heading cards and eighteen statement cards about old age pensions, national insurance, labour exchanges, free school meals, the Children's and Young Person's Act as well as school medical services. Once students have cut them out they can review the cards under the two headings and then use them as a basis for producing an extended piece of writing. Depending upon the class this could take the form of an essay or even a newspaper report with contrasting views.The aims and objectives for this lesson are:Theme: The Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911Know: What reforms did the Liberals introduce 1906 - 1911?Understand: How successful was each reform at helping different groups in society?Evaluate: How successful were the Liberal Reforms at solving the problems facing working people?WILF - What Am I Looking For?Identify & describe: The reforms introduced by the Liberals 1906 - 1911?Explain: How successful was each reform at helping different groups in society?Analyse: How successful were the Liberal Reforms at improving the lives of working people?This resource is provided in Microsoft Word format so it can be easily tailored to suit the needs of your students. If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want.Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates.Kind RegardsRoy

By Roy_Huggins

Revision Notes: Why did poverty become a political issue in 1906?

Revision Notes: Why did poverty become a political issue in 1906?

This great resource is designed to be used as revision guide to explain why poverty became a political issue in 1906 as a prelude to studying the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911 or the Suffragettes at either GCSE or A LevelThis three page resource includes a range of information and sources about British society in 1900 and the work of the social reformers into the primary and secondary causes of poverty on page 1. These revision notes also look at the issue of national efficiency and why Britain was losing its place in as the World economic power as well as the growth of both trade unions and the Labour Party. Page two of this resource includes diagrams, graphs and quotes from the Rowntree Report into the causes of poverty in York. Page 3 includes a summary exercise with a list of focus questions to help students pick out the key information that they need to know for the exam.If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want.Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates.Kind RegardsRoy

By Roy_Huggins

Revision Notes: Structure of Edwardian Society Notes & Summary Tasks

Revision Notes: Structure of Edwardian Society Notes & Summary Tasks

This great resource is designed to be used as either a worksheet or a revision guide to Edwardian Society in 1900 as a prelude to studying the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911 or the Suffragettes at either GCSE or A LevelThis resource includes a range of information and sources that explain the differences between the different classes in Edwardian society. It looks at life expectancy, housing, holidays, education and other factors. On the second and third pages, this resource looks at attitudes towards poverty and the workhouse. Page four includes a summary exercise with a list of focus questions to help students pick out the key information that they need to know.The aims and objectives for this lesson are:Theme: Introduction to Edwardian SocietyKnow: How was Edwardian society structured?Understand: What were the key differences between the classes?Evaluate: How fair was Edwardian Society? WILF - What Am I Looking For?Identify and describe: The key features of Edwardian Society?Explain: What were the key differences between the classes?Analyse: How fair was Edwardian Society?If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want.Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates.Kind RegardsRoy

By Roy_Huggins

Card Sort: Why did the Liberals introduce their reforms 1906 - 1911?

Card Sort: Why did the Liberals introduce their reforms 1906 - 1911?

This great resource makes an excellent starter, plenary or revision activity for teaching the introduction to the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911. Its aimed primarily at low to middle ability students, although it is also suitable for higher ability students. If you would like to give them some stretch and challenge, then you could always ask them to prioritise the different factors or even download my diamond 9 or activity on this topic.The resource includes four heading cards labelled social reformers, political rivalry, new liberalism and national efficiency, as well as 16 statement cards to be correct sorted under them.The aims and objectives for this lesson are:Theme: How successful were the Liberal Reforms 1906 - 1911?Know: Why did the Liberals introduced their reforms?Understand: What roles did social reformers, national efficiency, political rivalry and new liberalism play influencing their decision?Evaluate: which factors were the most important?WILF: What Am I Looking For?Identify & Describe: Why did the Liberals introduce their reforms?Understand: What roles did the social reformers, national efficiency, political rivalry and new liberalism play?Analyse: Which factors were the most important?If you like this resource then why not check out my other resources on this topic in my TES shop. You can also follow 'The History Academy' on Twitter, Google Plus, YouTube and Facebook for the latest updates or even to get in touch and chat about how you have used this resource or to ask questions. We aim to produce cheap and affordable resources for either the price of a good cup of coffee or a happy meal so that you can spend more time doing the things that you want.Anyway, have fun and stay in touch via social media for the latest updates.Kind RegardsRoy

By Roy_Huggins

The Victorians - A complete Unit of Work - with Guided Reading

The Victorians - A complete Unit of Work - with Guided Reading

A complete Programme of work for teaching the Victorians in either Key Stage 2 or Key Stage 3. The pack includes Summary Planning providing a suggested sequence of teaching which includes Time-line work and a series of Historical Investigation and debate activities based using quotes from people alive in the Victorian times and Victorian novels. The pack also includes planning for five groups of Guided reading, drawing on a combination of Victorian and contemporary novelists. Additionally, there are ten comprehensions included that could be used as additional whole class activities or as homework.

By MikeRichards

The Victorians - A complete Unit of Work

The Victorians - A complete Unit of Work

A complete Programme of work for teaching the Victorians in either Key Stage 2 or Key Stage 3. The pack includes Summary Planning providing a suggested sequence of teaching which includes Time-line work and a series of Historical Investigation and debate activities based using quotes from people alive in the Victorian times and Victorian novels. Additionally, there are ten comprehensions included that could be used as additional whole class activities or as homework.

By MikeRichards

Edexcel 9-1 Nazi Germany.  L4 How far did the actions of the Weimar Republic have a positive impact?

Edexcel 9-1 Nazi Germany. L4 How far did the actions of the Weimar Republic have a positive impact?

A lesson that looks at some of the challenges faced by the Weimar Republic between 1919-1923. Students assess a range of the actions taken by the new government and they determine if they had a positive or negative impact and they begin to rank these actions. The main activity invites students to look at some of the stamps produced between 1919-1923, after discussing how they are made to look, they then set about designing their own stamp which they feel accurately represents the actions of the government in the years 1919-23. Key terms and additional sources included. Homework tasks included which aim to cement their understanding of the terms of the Treaty of Versailles from year 9.

By planmylesson

Edexcel 9-1 Weimar and Nazi Germany.  L3 How strong was the Weimar Constitution?

Edexcel 9-1 Weimar and Nazi Germany. L3 How strong was the Weimar Constitution?

An easy to follow lesson on the Weimar Constitution. Students create a fact file about the National Assembly. Following this they extract strengths and weaknesses of the constitution, which they rank and use the information to respond to a series of questions. There is a step by step guide included which is very simple to follow. Literacy support and self assessment grids included.

By planmylesson

*Full Lesson* Changing Nature of the Royal Navy: Introduction and the Age of Sail (Edexcel A-Level)

*Full Lesson* Changing Nature of the Royal Navy: Introduction and the Age of Sail (Edexcel A-Level)

This is the second lesson in a series covering the new Edexcel A-Level History unit: Britain losing and gaining an Empire 1763 - 1914.This series of lessons covers the second breadth study: The Changing Nature of the Royal NavyThe lesson is ready to teach and includes all resources in the power point. The lessons refer to the textbook "Britain: Losing and gaining and Empire, 1763 - 1914" (Christie, 2016 Pearson) although other textbooks could be used with the lessons.During the lesson pupils will:* Use images of different ship designs between the 16th century and 1906 to make inferences about the development of the Navy over time. * Identify and discuss the key roles and importance of the Royal Navy to Britain* Investigate naval tactics during the age of sail through a brief study of the Battle of Trafalgar.* Evaluate the different ships in the Royal Navy from ships of the line to sixth-rate ships and the roles they undertook. * Evaluate the effectiveness of the Royal navy during the age of sail. Check out my shop (Click on my username above) for more free and premium resources including more lessons from this unit. If you buy this resource, please leave a review.

By zero1010

*Full Lesson* Changing Nature of Royal Navy: Development of Technology (Edexcel A-Level History)

*Full Lesson* Changing Nature of Royal Navy: Development of Technology (Edexcel A-Level History)

This is the second lesson in a series covering the new Edexcel A-Level History unit: Britain losing and gaining an Empire 1763 - 1914.This series of lessons covers the second breadth study: The Changing Nature of the Royal NavyThe lesson is ready to teach and includes all resources in the power point. The lessons refer to the textbook "Britain: Losing and gaining and Empire, 1763 - 1914" (Christie, 2016 Pearson) although other textbooks could be used with the lessons.During the lesson pupils will:* Compare the design of the HMS Albion (1763) and the HMS Dreadnought (1906) and make inferences about technological advances between them. * Recap information from previous lesson about the limitations of naval ships during the age of sail. * Watch a video to identify the key advances in technology on the HMS Warrior.* Investigate and interpret image of the tug of war between HMS Rattler and HMS Alecto and suggest why it is happening. * Compare difference advances in naval technology and debate the most significant. Highlight advances made by the British and those made by other countries. * Discuss the Royal Navy transition from sail to steam. Discuss and identify key factors which would need to exist to allow this transition to occur (MEERPS)* Research specific technological advances and impacts.* Discuss the statement "Steam power was the most important technology developed/adopted by the British Navy during the 19th century. It allowed Britain to maintain its Naval superiority across the globe.”Check out my shop (Click on my username above) for more free and premium resources including more lessons from this unit. If you buy this resource, please leave a review.

By zero1010

Martin Luther King - Role Play Tasks

Martin Luther King - Role Play Tasks

A differentiated task for students to collect information on Martin Luther King and the Civil Rights groups. The aim is to see the importance the role each group played in achieving Civil Rights.A fun task which can be used to collect important information prior to a literacy based task.

By History_Geek

Medieval Religion : Monks and Nuns

Medieval Religion : Monks and Nuns

An hour long, fully resourced lesson with powerpoint, differentiated tasks throughout, worksheets, clip link and accompanying task focusing on the imortance of religion in medieval lives. Designed to meet Ofsted Good-Outstanding criteria by a experienced History teacher in a UK secondary school.

By History_Geek

Edexcel GCSE 9-1 History Crime and Punishment c1000-c1700

Edexcel GCSE 9-1 History Crime and Punishment c1000-c1700

Bundle includes all teaching material for the first two sections of the Crime and Punishment c1000-present Paper 1 topic. 16 fully resourced lessons which include PowerPoints, key word lists, self assessment grids, example questions, card sorts, worksheets and literacy support.

By planmylesson

Landmarks from Around the World

Landmarks from Around the World

A resource containing interesting facts about 15 famous world landmarks (such as the Eiffel Tower, Sydney Opera House, The Pyramids at Giza and the Colosseum in Rome). You could use the resource as a listening activity, guessing game, research opportunity or discussion prompt. A useful resource for a topic on buildings, countries, cultures or famous places.

By cassieborodenko

Medicine through time

Medicine through time

Medicine through time resources. Includes active learning lessons, revision games, numerous worksheets, some stand alone lessons and a variety of starter and plenary activities. Easy to adapt and all proven in the classroom.

By dmoorhouse