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WATCH: How to attract candidates

Attracting the right teachers to apply for your job vacancy is a challenge for school leaders. Grainne Hallahan finds out what strategies successful schools are taking

Grainne Hallahan

Crazy teacher type

Not only must a school keep its students numbers up, it also has to have a plan to stay fully staffed all year round. 

This is a challenge that grows by the day as more teachers leave the profession, and student numbers grow in secondary schools. If a teacher is looking for a new position, they have more choice than ever before.

So how can leaders ensure they are attracting the right candidates to apply for their vacancies?  

When you plan how you market your school, you have to be sure you're communicating the ideology of your school clearly. The vision of your school must be clear in order to attract staff who share your ideas, and will ensure they work with you to achieve it.

We spoke to two leaders to get their insights on how schools approach their recruitment planning:


 

Attracting new teachers in UK schools


Melissa Heppell is principal of Atlantic Primary Academy in Portland. She explains how she has developed a strategy for marketing her school to teachers, and how they work on attracting the right people to apply for vacancies.


Attracting new teachers in international schools


 Chris Sammons, principal at West Island School in Hong Kong, explains the challenges facing leaders in international schools when attracting new teachers.

To get matched with your perfect teaching role visit tes.com/perfect-match   

Previous episodes in this series:

  1. Planning your career  
  2. How to make job hunting a success
  3. Leaders: How to plan your recruitment
  4. How to relocate for your teaching job
  5. How to make your teaching application form stand out
  6. How to make your interview a success

Grainne Hallahan

Grainne Hallahan

Grainne Hallahan is Tes recruitment editor and senior content writer at Tes

Find me on Twitter @heymrshallahan

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