GCSE English and maths: Entries soar by 20 per cent

Over 130,000 sat English language or maths GCSE exams this November series after exams were cancelled in the summer
27th November 2020, 10:41am

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GCSE English and maths: Entries soar by 20 per cent

https://www.tes.com/magazine/archive/gcse-english-and-maths-entries-soar-20-cent
Coronavirus: Some 20 Per Cent More Students Sat English Language & Maths Gcse Exams This November, After Exams Were Cancelled In The Summer, Ofqual Data Shows

The number of entries in GCSE English language and maths exams this month was 20 per cent higher than in the 2019 November series, new data shows.

According to statistics on the November exam series, published by Ofqual this morning, the number rose from 109,495 in 2019 to 131,300 this year. There were 72,115 entries in GCSE mathematics in November 2020, compared with 55,955 entries in November 2019 - an increase of 29 per cent. Entries in English language increased to 59,185, representing an 11 per cent increase on 2019.


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According to Ofqual, the majority of entries in GCSE mathematics were for the foundation tier (93 per cent). The remaining students (7 per cent) entered for the higher tier paper. Entries by Year 12 students increased slightly to 62,565 in 2020 but there was a large increase in entries by students in Year 13 and above to 67,450, Ofqual said.

Increased entries in November GCSE exams

Following the cancellation of exams this summer, students unhappy with their centre-assessed grades had the opportunity to sit an exam this month - adding to already large numbers of students resitting GCSE English and maths exams in colleges in the autumn series.

GCSE English language and maths entries in November 2020Recently Tes reported that many institutions were expecting hundreds of students to sit the exams - with some of them expecting in excess of 500 students. This led to some having to move classes online to free up space for exam sittings or having to recruit additional staff to oversee the exams.   

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