Almost three in five teachers still haven't received pay award

New survey highlights teacher 'anger' and shows one fifth of teachers are considering leaving the profession because of pay

money, funding, shortfall, teachers' pay grant, pay rise, nick gibb, angela rayner, pensions, consultation

A survey of 6,900 teachers in England found that 57 per cent had not yet received the pay award handed out by the government at the end of last year.

That’s despite £187 million additional funding being made available to schools to help fund the award beyond the first one per cent of the award.

The survey results were published today by the NASUWT teaching union, which said there were almost £4 billion in unspent school balances that would provide £8,763 per teacher to fund pay and pay progression.

It found that a fifth of teachers had still not received a decision as to whether they would receive performance-related pay, despite DfE recommendations that teachers should be notified by the end of October.

NASUWT general secretary Chris Keates said: “It is yet another illustration of the reason why the education service is facing the worst teacher recruitment and retention crisis since World War Two.

“Teachers are rightly angry and frustrated at the seeming indifference of ministers to ensure they are recognised and rewarded fairly for the work they do.”

The pay award amounts to 3.5 per cent for teachers on the main pay range, 2 per cent for those on the upper pay range and 1.5 per cent for those on the leadership range.

The government confirmed that £508 million would be available to fund it, including £187 million in 2018/19 and £321 million in 2019/20.

According to the survey, 58 per cent of teachers said that they were "angry" or "really angry" about their pay and thought that teachers were treated unfairly by the government. a total of 19 per cent said that they were so disillusioned that they were considering leaving teaching because of pay alone.

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