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Boys will be boisterous

As the mother of a four-year-old boy, I can sympathise with the views of Professor Alison Wolf. My son, who started full-time school this term, is taught under the foundation phase. He exhibits all the stereotypes experts now attribute to boys his age. He rushes around a lot, is boisterous and prone to the odd fit of pique.

As the mother of a four-year-old boy, I can sympathise with the views of Professor Alison Wolf. My son, who started full-time school this term, is taught under the foundation phase. He exhibits all the stereotypes experts now attribute to boys his age. He rushes around a lot, is boisterous and prone to the odd fit of pique.

As the mother of a four-year-old boy, I can sympathise with the views of Professor Alison Wolf. My son, who started full-time school this term, is taught under the foundation phase. He exhibits all the stereotypes experts now attribute to boys his age. He rushes around a lot, is boisterous and prone to the odd fit of pique.

He has settled into school well, but already questions why the day is so long. He is also aggrieved there are not so many toys to play with compared with his nursery.

It will come as no surprise that his pre-school nursery report showed his numeracy was better than his literacy, despite concerted efforts by his family to read to him every day. His preferred activity was "making things".

These are all reasons why I am pinning my hopes on the foundation phase. My son is, rather reassuringly after funding shortfalls, in a class of 24 with the magical 1:8 adult to child ratio that the experts recommend.

All the early research shows that the foundation phase will benefit boys, particularly the more boisterous, more than it does girls. My fingers are firmly crossed.

Nicola Porter Editor of TES Cymru.

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