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From the forums

How many hours do you work?

Eleven hours a day is plenty for me.

Lilachardy

7am till 5pm at school. Then about 6-8pm at night. Then about five hours at weekends. It's been a while since I calculated it. Sickens me, really.

Slippeddisc

At present, 70-75 a week. I'm senior leadership team, though. New to the school, too. Just so much to do and Ofsted looming. It never ends.

Sparky1985

I get in at 7am and then get kicked out at 6pm. I'm having to spend about two to three hours a night working at home. Oh, the joys of being under a new regime.

Pinkflipflop

When I was on strike in June and lost a day's pay, I worked out that I was earning about six quid an hour.

Frances1985

I love my job when I am in the classroom with the kids. But as I sit here ready to face another Sunday afternoon of marking and then paperwork, I just feel p'd off. If I take any time off during the week after school hours, I spend an ENTIRE weekend day catching up.

Sparky1985

I loved being in the classroom, but got fed up with working every Friday night and Saturday-night marking. On Sunday afternoon my mood would change as I got my planning folder out. Sadly, I am happier now in a nine-to-five job.

ff392

I get in at 7.30am and leave at 5pm, with half an hour for dinner and 10 minutes for lootea break. That's eight hours, 50 minutes a day.

getrichquick

I don't take a break or lunch - only a quick dash to the loo. I eat at my desk while working.

Sparky1985

When I had a post it was about 70 hours a week. Now I can't get a job, so nil.

Littlemissraw

It makes me really angry when people feel they have to work through to get things done - a member of the SLT gives the "nice for some" comment when they see you eating at lunchtime. Poor them, having to do lunchtime supervision when they have their one lesson a week that day. One of my colleagues makes sure we know when she is working through her lunch, with the usual "I'll have a lunch break this side of half-term, guffaw, guffaw".

bizent

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