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Gaps in pupil progress flagged up

Online exam tool will provide instant comparisons of performance in science and maths from national tests to GCSEs

Online exam tool will provide instant comparisons of performance in science and maths from national tests to GCSEs

Teachers will be able to make instant comparisons between pupils' progress from national tests to GCSEs as part of the latest online results analysis service to be offered by an exam board.

OCR claims its free Active Results service is the only one to allow schools to compare the GCSE performance of individual pupils with what they achieved in national tests as 14-year-olds. This can help decision- making for any resits. The service also offers breakdowns by exam question and topic, allowing teachers to identify strengths and weaknesses within subject areas.

Reports can be produced to review how well an individual pupil or an entire school has performed.

The system has been piloted for three months and is now available to all schools offering OCR's 21st- century and Gateway science GCSEs. The service will be extended to maths next and all subjects "soon", the board says.

Clara Kenyon, OCR qualifications director, said: "This is a tool that gives feedback about just where student achievement is and where the teacher can set targets for greater achievement."

OCR is the last of the big three English exam boards to offer teachers an online results analysis service. It said that when the end of compulsory key stage 3 tests filtered through to GCSE candidates, it would look at using data from the alternatives adopted by schools.

AQA exam board launched its Enhanced Results Analysis last summer and said 16,194 teachers have signed up to use it.

Edexcel began its Results Plus service in 2007. It now offers its GCSE maths customers free online tests for pupils at the end of KS3. After taking three of the tests, each pupil receives a national curriculum level score and report that highlight where in the GCSE course they are most likely to need more support.

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