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He is Wonder Mike and he’d like to say hello: Gove raps, the internet responds

Ever since Michael Gove’s love of ‘chap hop’ hit the headlines over the weekend, the world of education has been nervously waiting for the inevitable point where the education secretary would bust out a rhyme in front of a camera. 

That moment came yesterday during the BBC’s annual School Report project, where secondary school pupils get the chance to make their own news reports. During an interview with Mr Gove, one student asked him to give a “taster” of his favourite rap. Mr Gove responded with a quick blast of the Wham Rap! by Wham!, an 1980s band which featured George Michael and, at last look, continues to defy the label of any -hop subcultures.

[View:http://www.youtube.com/v/rxs8wv2idI0?fs=1?fs=1?fs=1?fs=1&rel=0]

Inspired by this, @tes asked users to spit out lyrics under the hashtag #goverhymes that Mr Gove could call upon the next time he is inevitably asked to rap for a rapt audience. Any amateur lyricist mentioned here will, of course, win a wonderful flashing biro, the lucky thing. 

Some took existing rap songs as their muse, including @smitajamdar, who went for a riff on LL Cool J’s Mama Said Knock You Out:

“Destruction, damage, terror and mayhem, Gove’s the education policy shaman, Anyone disagree he'll flay them”.

Other Twitterers came up with their own raps – meaning that you will need to imagine the funky beats that would be dropped behind the lyrics. These included @Jigsaw_Ed’s effort:

“Don't heed Hunt. Don't need Farage. When it comes to schools, I'm in charge.”

Another rap was submitted by @thegreatgar:

“My second name is Gove/My first is Michael/Gotta 50s curriculum/I wanna recycle.”

Unfortunately the limits of the 140 characters meant that some raps were kept regrettably short, but the intrepid @mick_rae managed to circumvent that by posting her Fresh Prince-inspired rap as a picture. The result was a thing of beauty and a joy forever.

Well done to all involved, you should be very proud. 
 
 

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