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Seven things teachers should know about adopted pupils

Most parents of adopted previously looked after children do not feel they have an equal chance at school

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Most parents of adopted previously looked after children do not feel they have an equal chance at school

AdoptionUK's Bridging the Gap report on adopted children who have been in the care system has some startling findings about their experience of education. Here are seven key facts teachers should be aware of: 

  • The permanent exclusion rate for previously looked-after children is 20 times higher than for their classmates. They also have higher levels of social, emotional and mental health needs:
  • The vast majority (79 per cent) routinely feel “confused and worried” at school:
  • Fewer than one in three children (30 per cent) achieve the expected standard at key stage 2, compared with 54 per cent of all children;
  • Just over one quarter (26 per cent) achieved five good GCSE grades including English and maths, compared with 53 per cent of all children;
  • Two-thirds of secondary-aged children who have been adopted have been teased or bullied at school specifically because they were adopted, according to a poll;
  • Three in five parents do not feel that their adopted child has an equal chance at school;
  • Two-thirds (69 per cent) of parents feel that their adopted child’s academic progress is blighted by problems with wellbeing at school.

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