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Snapshots

A week in the life of St Andrew's international high school Blantyre, Malawi

The school day starts early in Malawi - at 7.05am. But then it's all over at 12.30pm, and at this international school the afternoon is given over to sports and activities. The timing is dictated by the weather, which in the summer can see temperatures soar to 40C. It's winter there now, which means it is no hotter than an English summer. St Andrew's is one of only three large international schools in Malawi, and the only one in Blantyre. The 520 pupils (100 are boarders) aged 11 to 18 come from Malawi and 40 other countries - many of their parents are missionaries. They follow the English curriculum, doing international versions of GCSEs, with a sixth form of 60 doing A-levels. Pupils then go on to universities in England, the US, South Africa and Malawi. When it's not too hot and when it's not the rainy season (December to March) the pupils spend the afternoons playing cricket, rugby, hockey, volleyball and basket ball, and ompeting at athletics, swimming and cross-country. There are also clubs for making things, playing board games and doing service in the community, such as helping in ophanages. Eighty per cent of the 45 staff come from England and they stay for between two and 20 years. They will read this about two weeks after every one in Britain - that's how long the TES takes to get to Malawi.

Snaps by the staff

Mountain trail: Kakuu Maghembe strolls up Mulanje as part of a a sixth-form fund-raising trip

Smile of success: Kerry wins a swimming race

Wheely appreciated: the fund-raising bought four tricycles

Settling scores: the staff v students cricket match

Fast forward: it's sports day

Chess, African style: Francis Kaphuka and Hiazo Nkochi play bao

Ole! The flamenco troupe, from left, Yiwonda Banda, Neema Mwangulu, Patience Chiwaka, Kim Ferguson, Gianna Schellenberg, Eleanoe Ntonya, Nancy Day and Cellina Mlusu

Visit St Andrew's website on: www.saints.merula.co.uk

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