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So sick of the verbiage

We like to think of teachers as a reasonable, patient lot, not much given to rants about the everyday frustrations of their working lives

We like to think of teachers as a reasonable, patient lot, not much given to rants about the everyday frustrations of their working lives

But the thing that "does their head in" is phrases like, er, "does their head in". And "forward planning". As Doomzebra points out, "any other kind is pointless".

The sharp-eyed will spot a political theme to Bobvincent's frighteningly extensive hate-list of phrases: royal family (and royal wedding), executive, community, academy, Tea Party. And on, and on. And on.

Celticqueen is concerned about anger-management issues: "Are there any phrases you do like, Bob?" The reply that he's "vented his spleen - for now" offers little comfort.

dlbriffa says they used to believe "vomit inducing" phrases were reserved for the business world. But since doing teacher training, they've found this is not the case. On their banned list are:

- reflective diary - "seriously? who on earth has time to keep a reflective diary?"

- effective practitioner - "what's wrong with `good teacher'?"

- pedagogy - "need I say more?"

You might think that having got all that off their chest, dlbriffa would feel more at peace with the world. Not so: "I want to be sick now."

Elsewhere on the messageboards, there's a warning that prospective employers take a dim view of verbiage, too.

Silent85 would like some help with their job application. But Middlemarch warns that "buzz words" won't do the trick. TheoGriff agrees, saying that the application "needs to be from the heart".

Let's hope silent85 heeds the advice - and that Bobvincent isn't on the interview panel.

He has just remembered another phrase he hates: "I'm passionate about ."

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