Cross-curricular media studies

28th February 2003 at 00:00
Any subject could use a real-time simulation of a newsroom to consolidate understanding of events - natural disasters in geography, big events in history. Making the simulation work is easy if you prepare your material as a PowerPoint presentation, including images, sound and video clips as well as text, and then use the "slide transition timing" feature to deliver your content in "real time". Students in editorial groups can monitor, order and select from the incoming flow of information to write accounts of events, changing them as new material appears.

Editorial writing can be made more exciting and convincing by using real news content. Find it online at www.reuters.com or newspapers (www.timesonline.co.uk).

Students can work in teams to assemble a front page, deciding on format - tabloid, broadsheet, daily or sunday, local or national, and making and justifying decisions about appropriateness for readership, bias etc. The final version doesn't have to be print: it could be a web page or a multimedia presentation.

Log-in as an existing print or digital subscriber

Forgotten your subscriber ID?

Subscribe

To access this content and the full TES archive, subscribe now.

View subscriber offers

Get TES online and delivered to your door – for less than the price of a coffee

Save 33% off the cover price with this great subscription offer. Every copy delivered to your door by first-class post, plus full access to TES online and the TES app for just £1.90 per week.
 
Subscribers also enjoy a range of fantastic offers and benefits worth over £270:

  • Discounts off TES Institute courses
  • Access over 200,000 articles in the TES online archive
  • Free Tastecard membership worth £79.99
  • Discounts with Zipcar, Buyagift.com, Virgin Wines and other partners
Order your low-cost subscription today