Guidance fears over axed posts

17th January 2003 at 00:00
MINISTERS have been urged not to make any changes to the structure of promoted posts in secondary schools until after the national review of guidance has reported in December.

In a letter to Nicol Stephen, Deputy Education Minister, the Scottish Parent Teacher Council says it "makes no sense" to introduce the post-McCrone changes, which will see the disappearance of assistant principal teacher posts from August, before the guidance review is complete.

The SPTC fears schools will not be able to provide adequate guidance which is largely the responsibility of APTs and principal teachers. Guidance will have to rely on the goodwill of teachers.

The Scottish Executive has told the Association of Directors of Education that there is "no reason" why classroom or chartered teachers who are already timetabled for pupil support work should not continue to provide it. Some APTs will become chartered teachers and others will opt for management duties which will allow them to continue with their guidance work.

But the SPTC argues that "the chartered teacher position is about teaching and does not carry with it time for guidance".

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