The junking of chunking is bad news for maths pupils

1st February 2013 at 00:00

Your article on primary maths raises the issue once again of whether or not politicians should be able to prescribe teaching methods. The legal situation is unclear. The Education Reform Act 1988 does proscribe the education secretary from prescribing teaching methods. But there is an ambiguity. Is doing long multiplication by traditional methods part of the content of the proposed new curriculum or is it one of the methodologies by which that curriculum is taught? If the former, then it can be prescribed by the government. If the latter, it cannot.

If challenged, Michael Gove would probably say that he won't be prescribing how traditional long multiplication is taught but that it will be taught. I'm afraid the system lost the chance to challenge this issue when it capitulated on synthetic phonics.

Colin Richards, Spark Bridge, Cumbria.

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