Poetic injustice

12th September 2008 at 01:00
The next logical step for AQA, having deleted Carol Ann Duffy's "Education for Leisure" from study because it refers to "knife crime" is, as many have said, to ban Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

The next logical step for AQA, having deleted Carol Ann Duffy's "Education for Leisure" from study because it refers to "knife crime" is, as many have said, to ban Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet.

This decison draws an arbitrary and indefensible distinction between representations of knife crime in different media. Further, if poems that disturb are removed from the anthology, students' answers will become even more formulaic than they are already.

Lionel Warner, Lecturer, Institute of Education, University of Reading.

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