Race against the stork

25th April 2008 at 01:00
A recent race night in Glasgow's St Mungo's Academy ended up in the maternity hospital when one of the punters attending the racy event went into labour during a visit to the school toilets
A recent race night in Glasgow's St Mungo's Academy ended up in the maternity hospital when one of the punters attending the racy event went into labour during a visit to the school toilets.

The unfortunate lady seems to have overplayed her bets by thinking that going into labour was against the odds but, thanks to the early intervention of headie John Reilly, mother was soon carted off to hospital where all was well.

Race nights are a sure bet, and an exciting way to raise cash for school funds, but schools will now have to risk-assess the excitement level to prevent any further races against the stork - or just ban mothers-to-be.

Brian is toast

News that the heidie of Stonelaw High in Rutherglen had banned toasters in staffrooms spread like smoke from flaming toast when it was revealed recently.

This was even more of a gift to headline writers than usual since the head is called Brian Cooklin - as in "What's Cooklin at Stonelaw?" "Anything but toast."

Papering over the cracks

We understand the dilemma: a newspaper has to give as much prominence to its major promotions as it does to the news of the day - without one getting in the way of the other.

Aberdeen's Evening Express has been running one of those promotions which allows readers the chance to have their council tax bill paid for a year by simply answering an in-paper question and calling or texting their answer to the number provided.

The big city story of the moment is the impact on local services of the council's cash crisis. And so one of last week's issues splashed the headline across the front page, "School budgets slashed again" - while the "Win your council tax for a year" puff sat uncomfortably alongside.

The newspaper's designers were equal to the task, however, and sorted the problem by having a mocked-up teacher picture, complete with mortar board, keeping the two apart.

Aged concern

Moray Council's redoubtable Alistair Farquhar, who looks after the council's education purse (aka head of educational resource services), was having to look both ways last week.

He had been called to give evidence to the Parliament's education committee on the funding of the school estate. But, he told MSPs, it was the council's provision for the elderly which was of "increasing personal interest" to him.

Farquhar said he would not want their care to be adversely affected by funding a school estate that was not required. It's a case of when one school shuts its doors, a care home door opens.

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