Restricted entry

24th March 2000 at 00:00
A HEAD of department, supported by the head of sixth form, has told me, as examinations officer, not to enter a student for A-level in her subject, because his record indicates that he stands no chance of

passing. They recommend that he takes the AS-level course. The parents are protesting and have asked to pay for the entry. They are also insisting that the school should continue to prepare the student for A-level. Advice please.

While the law requires that a student cannot be charged for an entry for a public examination for which the school has

prepared him the governors have the right not to make an entry if the student is judged to be unsuitable. If the school continues to prepare this student for A-level, a charge would therefore be inappropriate. If the student does not follow the course, but the parents wish to pay for an entry, the school has discretion whether to accept that or not.

Neither the parents nor the student have the right to insist upon participation in a course which the school has decided is inappropriate for him. The head of sixth form will need to see the parents and clear this matter up.


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