School or college?

5th March 2004 at 00:00
Your job and career questions answered

I want to become an ICT secondary teacher. I have been unemployed for three years because of a health problem that has now cleared up. I am retaking my GCSEs and would like to do a PGCE this year. I have taught in colleges and in a school as a ICT technician. I want a secure career. Is teaching in schools a good career move?

According to the Teacher Training Agency, it is. Even with falling pupil numbers, there will still be a large pupil population that needs an education; and many teachers will retire within the next few years who need to be replaced. But the re-modelling of the workforce may mean that different types of job emerge, ranging from traditionally qualified teachers to teaching assistants and a variety of different learning support technicians and assistants. ICT is a relatively new subject and there is a shortage of qualified teachers, so your subject choice is a bonus. However, there will be regional variations, and it will be harder to secure a post in a popular school than in a more challenging one.

If you have a question for John Howson, please email karen.thornton@tes.co.uk

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