The "teenaging" of modern culture

10th October 2003 at 01:00

Forever Young: the "teen-aging" of modern culture
By Marcel Danesi
University of Toronto Press (distributed by Plymbridge) pound;14

With the exception of fleeting references to high school proms and the failure of sex education to encourage safe sex among teens, Marcel Danesi doesn't touch on education until the final 10 pages of Forever Young. When he does, his view of schooling is alarming and, given the insightful argument he makes about the evanescent nature of teens and teen culture, incoherent.

His argument that popular culture is imbued with a "juvenile aesthetic" is interesting and informative. His semiotics background comes in handy when contrasting today's view of the angst-ridden adolescent with his medieval counterpart; then, adolescens referred to pre-pubescent boys who moved away from their families to work in a guild or trade. Danesi finds that today's adults are desperate to avoid growing up.

Read more in this week's TES Friday magazine

Log-in as an existing print or digital subscriber

Forgotten your subscriber ID?


To access this content and the full TES archive, subscribe now.

View subscriber offers


Get TES online and delivered to your door – for less than the price of a coffee

Save 33% off the cover price with this great subscription offer. Every copy delivered to your door by first-class post, plus full access to TES online and the TES app for just £1.90 per week.
Subscribers also enjoy a range of fantastic offers and benefits worth over £270:

  • Discounts off TES Institute courses
  • Access over 200,000 articles in the TES online archive
  • Free Tastecard membership worth £79.99
  • Discounts with Zipcar,, Virgin Wines and other partners
Order your low-cost subscription today