Time to stop the moaning

9th February 2001 at 00:00
I READ the article by Sean McPartlin (TESS, January 26) whilst visiting friends in Glasgow. What a deeply sad man he is, and what a sad household he lives in! He encapsulates all the reasons I gave up teaching in Scotland and decided to go for a job in the real world.

The self-referential angst shown by him and his colleagues reflects sadly on a profession which really needs to achieve esteem in the eyes of "normal families" (his words!) to justify a pay rise which such "normal families" would die for.

Does he seriously believe that teachers are the only people who have problems with work out of normal hours, with child care (at least he andor his wife finish at 4pm) or with Christmas and holiday planning? And does he seriously believe that the long holidays (which I used to enjoy) are no compensation?

My friends, family and neighbours pursue a ide range of occupations: engineers, journalists, nurses, doctors, police officers, local government, caterers, lawyers - even teachers. All of them have issues combining work and family, be it shift working, unplanned and unpaid overtime, anti-social hours, emergency call-outs, time spent away from home or increased workloads. But only teachers moan all of the time, and I do mean all of the time.

As Sean McPartlin says, it is always easy to spot teachers but not because of their untidiness: they are the ones who do nothing but bewail their lot, who wag their fingers constantly and who wear the hangdog look.

For God's sake, Sean, waken up and grow up. If the going gets too tough, try another job and see how the rest of the world has to cope without the 4pm finish and the long holidays.

John Johnston Lake Lock Grove, Stanley, Wakefield


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