Putting learning in a positive light

AudiobookListen

Teachers want pupils to be dazzled by their lessons rather than sunlight streaming in through the classroom windows – but research suggests that exposure to natural light could have an impact on student outcomes, writes Simon Lock

Put learning in a positive light

Can someone at the back please close the blinds?”

It’s a phrase heard across the nation’s schools in those classrooms that are regularly pierced with blinding sunlight. While the teachers in the shadows of north-facing buildings long for the golden glow of natural light, those right in the glare of it often do their best to shut it out.

That’s probably a bad idea. As is placing classrooms beyond the reach of decent levels of daylight. For though the position of a given classroom might not seem important when your September teaching hand is dealt, there is evidence to suggest that having ...

Subscribe to get access to the content on this page.

If you are already a Tes/ Tes Scotland subscriber please log in with your username or email address to get full access to our magazine content, audio articles and back issues page.

Not a subscriber? Find out more about our subscription offers.

See my options

Other articles in this issue