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Revealed: The best and worst MATs for progress after GCSE

Multi-academy trusts' performance on progress between GCSEs and A levels has been revealed in new figures

MAT progress GCSE A level value added

Multi-academy trusts' performance on progress between GCSEs and A levels has been revealed in new figures

The best and worst performing multi-academy trusts in the country for progress after GCSEs have been revealed by the Department for Education.

Today it published new data on MATs' "level 3 value-added" performance – the progress that pupils make between key stage 4 and graded level 3 qualifications, excluding tech levels.


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The measure compares pupils’ results to those of other pupils nationally with similar prior attainment.

Academy trust progress scores 

For all pupils nationally, the average progress score is zero, so a positive score means that pupils within the MAT on average do better than those with similar prior attainment nationally, whereas a negative score means that on average they do worse.

The top 10 MATs were:

  • Diocese of London (0.13 value added)
  • Inspiration Trust (0.12)
  • Aldridge Education (0.12)
  • Dixons Academy Trust (0.1)
  • The Castle School Education Trust (0.08)
  • The Thinking Schools Academy Trust (0.06)
  • Oasis Community Learning (0.06)
  • Ark Schools (0.04)
  • East Midlands Education Trust (0.04)
  • Invictus Education Trust (0.01)
     

The bottom 10 MATs were:

  • Swale Academies Trust (-0.06)
  • Rosedale Hewens Academy Trust (-0.53)
  • E-ACT (-0.39)
  • David Meller (-0.33)
  • Aspirations Academies Trust (-0.28)
  • City of London Academies Trust (-0.27)
  • Creative Education Academies Trust (-0.25)
  • Matrix Academy Trust (-0.22)
  • Leigh Academy Trust (-0.22)
  • Grace Foundation (-0.21)
     

MATs were only included in the analysis if they had more than three schools that had belonged to the trust for at least three years.

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