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Sats results 2018: The long wait is almost over

Primaries are due to get the results of this year’s Sats tomorrow – with a small rise in the writing results predicted

stressed primary child

Primaries are due to get the results of this year’s Sats tomorrow – with a small rise in the writing results predicted

The wait is almost over. Tomorrow, primary headteachers will discover how many of their Year 6 pupils passed the crucial Sats tests.

The results are due to be released to schools slightly later than usual this year – at 7.30am rather than midnight – although a breach late last week meant some heads have already seen their results on the secure NCA tools website.

The national results are due to be released at 9.30am.

The No More Marking team has already predicted that writing results will rise by one percentage point, from 76 per cent of 10- and 11-year-olds achieving the expected standard, to 77 per cent, based on a sample of more than 5,000 portfolios of Year 6 writing.

'Feeling sick' over Sats results

And heads and Year 6 teachers are now nervously awaiting their own pupils' results – with some hoping that England’s so-far-victorious World Cup performance is a good omen.

 

And the move from a midnight release to 7.30am is being welcomed.

 

Reaction to the tests during Sats week this year was mixed: the spelling test was thought to be hard but the reading paper was seen as fair. The maths papers shocked some teachers who thought they were tough, particularly the final test which was described as a “nightmare” and left some pupils in tears.

Last year, 61 per cent of pupils reached the expected standard in reading, writing and maths – a rise of eight percentage points on 2016, the first year of the new Sats tests.

Last year, spelling, punctuation and grammar (Spag) was the test passed by the highest proportion of pupils (77 per cent).

More than three-quarters (76 per cent) of pupils reached the expected standard in writing in 2017, which is assessed by teachers rather than tested, and 75 per cent reached the expected standard in maths, followed by 72 per cent reaching the expected standard in reading.

While schools will get pupils’ scores tomorrow, it is up to headteachers to decide when to tell pupils their individual results. If schools want to appeal against a pupil’s test result, they have until Friday 20 July to do so.

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