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Students want work experience back in the curriculum

University degrees no longer seen as the most important factor for getting a job, according to a new survey published today

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University degrees no longer seen as the most important factor for getting a job, according to a new survey published today

Teenage students want work experience to be a compulsory part of the curriculum again, a survey has found.

The research by the Career Colleges Trust, published today, found that of the 1,000 14- to 19-year-olds asked, the vast majority (83 per cent) would like to see work experience to be part of their education.

Work placements were removed from the curriculum for key stage 4 pupils in 2012 after a recommendation in the Wolf report review of vocational education. The report said the education system should instead focus resources on providing longer internships for older pupils over the age of 16.

Training important

Today's survey also found teenagers no longer feel degrees are the most important thing for getting a job.

Over half thought professional training was the most important factor, while 41 per cent felt relevant work experience was essential and 22 per cent thought good careers guidance was the most important factor. Only 19 per cent said they thought a degree was the most important.

Nearly three-quarters of the youngsters who were surveyed said they would consider taking up an apprenticeship in order to get their dream job.

Teens 'desperate' for work experience

Chief executive of the Career Colleges Trust, Ruth Gilbert, said it was clear teenagers are desperate for good work experience opportunities.

She added: “Crucially, our research shows that young people want the opportunity to develop employability skills and recognise the importance of doing this. Schools, employers and the government simply must work together to support this.”

Careers colleges were set up by former education secretary Lord Baker to offer 14- to 19-year-olds an employer-led education as a career-focused alternative to school.

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