Covid data shows big changes in year-on-year attendance

Only one of Scotland's local authorities has seen pupil attendance rise in comparison with last year, new figures show
24th November 2020, 10:28am
Henry Hepburn

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Covid data shows big changes in year-on-year attendance

https://www.tes.com/magazine/archived/covid-data-shows-big-changes-year-year-attendance
Coronavirus: Data Shows Big Variation In Local Covid School Absences In Scotland

The picture of Covid-related school absences changes markedly in different parts of Scotland, analysis of government data shows.

A comparison of school attendance data for Tuesday 17 November with figures from a year previously shows, for example, that attendance was down by the largest margin in Glasgow (8.55 per cent), whereas in Shetland it was actually up by 0.3 per cent - the only one of Scotland's 32 local authorities to see a rise.


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The analysis, by University of Glasgow researcher Barry Black and Amy Lee Fraioli, who is a researcher for Scottish Labour, also compares data across Scotland's six "regional improvement collaboratives". The West Partnership, which includes large authorities such as Glasgow and North Lanarkshire, saw the biggest percentage drop, while the Northern Alliance, which includes Highland, saw the lowest percentage decrease.

When we look at local authorities, the change in attendance from the average in 2018/19 to last week is stark.

Attendance is down 8.55% in Glasgow, compared to being up by 0.3% in Shetland, for example.

Full list: pic.twitter.com/XKSEpkDvAS

- Barry Black (@BarryBlackNE) November 24, 2020

The figures also show that, on 17 November, the pupils most likely to be off school were those who live in the most deprived areas.

Meanwhile, primary school attendance (92.1 per cent) was considerably higher than secondary school attendance (85.3 per cent).

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