Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Enquiry TypesQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Enquiry Types

This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ set of support cards that set out the essence of each type of enquiry so the students can start to consider which one they should use and why. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Analysing editableQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Analysing editable

This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Analysing Data and being able to draw Conclusions from this, with the knock on benefit of supporting Literacy skills. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Controlling Variables EditQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Controlling Variables Edit

This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Controlling Variables as part of the Fair Test type of enquiry, but with the shift of focus towards the older students of variables to consider in other enquiry types. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Evaluating EditableQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Evaluating Editable

This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Evaluating the Method and the Results and Refining the Activity as well as starting to consider additional questions to investigate. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Doing Investigations EditQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Doing Investigations Edit

This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Observing and Measuring, progressing to a consideration of accuracy and sample size. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Presenting Evidence editableQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Presenting Evidence editable

This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Making the Decision on the Most Appropriate Way of Presenting the Data Gathered, and Communicating what was Found Out. By sharing that there are many ways in which information can be shared and presented this help decision making and also makes more links to maths, for example. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in enquiry and Investigation - Using Secondary Sources EditQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in enquiry and Investigation - Using Secondary Sources Edit

This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: How to use Research and use of Secondary Sources as part of progression in not only this skill but also within this type of enquiry. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Planning editableQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Planning editable

This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Planning the Enquiry and Starting to Consider which Type of Enquiry is Appropriate to Use and Why WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Enquiry Types editableQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Enquiry Types editable

This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ set of support cards that set out the essence of each type of enquiry so the students can start to consider which one they should use and why. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Revision ideas for StudentsQuick View

Revision ideas for Students

This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. Revision with Students can be hard to be exciting and get them motivated, but why not use this little guide, print it back to back and give to students along with a revision guide with some activities for them to do. You can print as often as you like (with school logo on as well). There are some 'tips and wrinkles' and quick reminder sheets of ideas for reference or turning into a bookmark, particularly if you are new to teaching, available too
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Asking Questions editableQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Asking Questions editable

This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Learning how to ask Questions that are Testable, rather than just 'questions'. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation COMPLETE EditableQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation COMPLETE Editable

This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. This is the whole of my Being Scientific Powerpoint and Word documents all as one document. You can read the blurb about these in the individual files and in the pdf bundle. This has been several years in development with use in schools and has proved to raise standards in English and maths from those that have used it in science, so why not have a go. Try an individual one if you like or buy the lot for a bargain price. This individual file has everything it in for about half the price of the individual items and you can edit it!
Tara_Lievesley
Differentiation and Marking Work EffectivelyQuick View

Differentiation and Marking Work Effectively

This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. A quick helpful guide on the ways you can support differentiation, along with support with planning objectives and outcomes as your first port of call of differentiation. This is often forgotten when planning, particularly in science for the skills, but these are what science is all about.
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Analysing and ConcludingQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Analysing and Concluding

This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Analysing Data and being able to draw Conclusions from this, with the knock on benefit of supporting Literacy skills. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - EvaluatingQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Evaluating

This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Evaluating the Method and the Results and Refining the Activity as well as starting to consider additional questions to investigate. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Carrying Out InvestigationsQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Carrying Out Investigations

This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Observing and Measuring, progressing to a consideration of accuracy and sample size. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific:  Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - PlanningQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Planning

This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Planning the Enquiry and Starting to Consider which Type of Enquiry is Appropriate to Use and Why. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Presenting EvidenceQuick View

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Presenting Evidence

This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Making the Decision on the Most Appropriate Way of Presenting the Data Gathered, and Communicating what was Found Out. By sharing that there are many ways in which information can be shared and presented this help decision making and also makes more links to maths, for example. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Tara_Lievesley
Being Scientific: some activities for extensionQuick View

Being Scientific: some activities for extension

This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. Sometimes we need some additional activities for students to explore but still to be linked to science. These can be a starting point of thinking for you to develop your own and then focus on a skill for the students to develop.
Tara_Lievesley
Science Self Assessment examples for scientific skillsQuick View

Science Self Assessment examples for scientific skills

This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. The first resource is more of a resource to help decide how you want students to carry out Self assessment. The 'How well are you doing' resource is linked to the grid I have uploaded previously, and the numbers are related loosely to year groups (although you can change these to perhaps be scientists names (which has worked well for me in the past) so that it is purely about progression). This resource is linked purely to skills for science.
Tara_Lievesley
Science Sublect LeadersQuick View

Science Sublect Leaders

This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. Just a few ideas and resources, some old, some new, to support you in leading your subject. The best resource you can use if actually by registering and developing science with the Primary Science Quality Mark (PSQM) as this is the best subject leader tool I know. But these may help.
Tara_Lievesley