Being Scientific:  Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Asking Testable Questions
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Asking Testable Questions

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This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Learning how to ask Questions that are Testable, rather than just 'questions'. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Complete Resource
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Complete Resource

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This is the COMPLETE pdf resource that you can purchase individual parts for to help with focus on scientific enquiry/working scientifically skills and working in a scientific manner, whilst maintaining the ‘enquiry cycle’, with progression built in. There is also support for deciding on the type of enquiry. This resource and be used from 5 year olds upwards, depending on ability. You can view a sample for free from here: http://www.makingitpractical.com/beingscientific.html The individual elements are for sale, but this 'bundle' also includes the student's and the display documents as a bonus. Whilst the terminology may have changed to ‘Working Scientifically’ in the National Curriculum for England, and the International Community use Inquiry rather than Enquiry, the skills involved are still pretty much the same what every you call them. It’s about ‘being scientific’ and this involves thinking in a certain way - simply put, it is about asking questions and finding answers. The method developed in the way the questions are answered and the analysis of the data discovered, leading to more questions… and so the cycle continues… This resource was developed to support that process as well as the use of individual skills. Each stage (the 7 boxed areas) has a series of age related support cards ‘underneath’ it, so the resource is quite a large one! Use it either with children for independent work or for you, the teacher, to use as an aid or prompt. Use it on the whiteboard for whole class teaching and to help illustrate which skill area is being developed in that session. If you want to develop individual skills as a focus of a lesson whilst maintaining the concept that it is part of a bigger picture, then this resource can help you. There is also the opportunity to use this as a 'desk resource' such as used when providing prompts and key points for different genres of writing. Based on the a generic progression, bringing together aspects of thinking, child development, and Blooms Taxonomy this resource supports the National Curricular of many countries without being restrictive to a single one. By definition because of the author’s background, it will be more closely aligned to the English National Curriculum for Science than any other. The resource consists of: pdf of PowerPoint of the individual resources also available from the author on the TES website A pupil version for when they are planning a complete investigation (older pupils) A display version, to enable you put examples of each skill on display, depending on your topic. This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources I have: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry - Developing Understanding of Graphs and Tables
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry - Developing Understanding of Graphs and Tables

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. Drawing tables and graphs can be a tricky business. This resource can be used with pupils to help them remember the 10 points they need, so if you mark out of 10 then they can start to see what mistakes they have made. Obviously this can help with other subjects than science! Another way to support this is with asking pupils to spot the mistakes... much easier than spotting what is correct! Here are a few examples to get you thinking and going. Having drawn the graph, how do you extract the information? Why not phrase it like 'telling a story'? Here are a few to get you started... This resource is also available as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources I have: tara@makingitpractical.com
Differentiation and Marking Work Effectively
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Tara_Lievesley

Differentiation and Marking Work Effectively

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. A quick helpful guide on the ways you can support differentiation, along with support with planning objectives and outcomes as your first port of call of differentiation. This is often forgotten when planning, particularly in science for the skills, but these are what science is all about.
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation COMPLETE Editable
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation COMPLETE Editable

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. This is the whole of my Being Scientific Powerpoint and Word documents all as one document. You can read the blurb about these in the individual files and in the pdf bundle. This has been several years in development with use in schools and has proved to raise standards in English and maths from those that have used it in science, so why not have a go. Try an individual one if you like or buy the lot for a bargain price. This individual file has everything it in for about half the price of the individual items and you can edit it!
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation -Predictions editable
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation -Predictions editable

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This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Planning the Enquiry and Developing Prediction Writing WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Impact Grids: Developing Learners
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Tara_Lievesley

Impact Grids: Developing Learners

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. The 'Impact Grids' originated with the National Strategies to which I developed other areas to support progression for teachers and departments. I've uploaded them in genres here so you can do with as you wish, as word documents. 4 documents for just £2! This set is based on Developing Learning to be more independed.
Thinking Activities linked to Blooms Templates
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Tara_Lievesley

Thinking Activities linked to Blooms Templates

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. This is nothing new and is not my original idea in terms of the structure, but here is template from which to create your own range of activities. These can either be then used to support extension within class; to give a range of homeworks at different levels and also supporting the development of different competencies; or for older children, provided for= them to choose a range of topic related homeworks or in class activities where they collect points and rewards. You choose! These are just the background and the templates. You can download some examples linked to topics - mainly related to science: as that is my thing!
Revision ideas for Students
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Tara_Lievesley

Revision ideas for Students

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. Revision with Students can be hard to be exciting and get them motivated, but why not use this little guide, print it back to back and give to students along with a revision guide with some activities for them to do. You can print as often as you like (with school logo on as well). There are some 'tips and wrinkles' and quick reminder sheets of ideas for reference or turning into a bookmark, particularly if you are new to teaching, available too
Being Scientific:  Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Planning
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Planning

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This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Planning the Enquiry and Starting to Consider which Type of Enquiry is Appropriate to Use and Why. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Assessment and Progression
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Assessment and Progression

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. Assessment for Learning is crucial for progression, but as teachers we need to have the tools to provide the next steps for children.  The idea of progression hasn’t changed: children still learn to walk before they can run (in the main!).  So where do you go for tools to help you?  There are many on the Internet and this is another, used by many schools I have worked with, and still used, despite the changes to the curriculum as progression hasn’t changed in skills: it’s only the topics that we provide the context for the skills that have changed: skills are the continuity in the science curriculum, they are the place to start. First we need an overview of what progression looks like: and this colourful image should help.  The key features are picked out in bold and taken from the National Curriculum for England, with supplementary ideas for other years groups, based on not only Blooms Taxonomy, but also the idea of Children Progression in general.   (If you want it in old fashioned language then Y6 is a mid level 5!) The devil though, as always, is in the detail.  So underlying this resource is a grid that has been developed more years than I care to mention, (and definitely prior to APP!) That can be used to help with feedback and planning next steps for you and your class.  There is also a set of questions to help as feedback comments for children to complement this resource. These resources is also available as a Word Document (from the TES website), which are then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources I have: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Carrying Out Investigations
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Carrying Out Investigations

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This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Observing and Measuring, progressing to a consideration of accuracy and sample size. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Controlling Variables
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Controlling Variables

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This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Controlling Variables as part of the Fair Test type of enquiry, but with the shift of focus towards the older students of variables to consider in other enquiry types. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Presenting Evidence
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Presenting Evidence

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This PDF resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In its PDF form it can be used to print out cards for the students, or to run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a fully editable Word or PowerPoint document from the TES website. SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Making the Decision on the Most Appropriate Way of Presenting the Data Gathered, and Communicating what was Found Out. By sharing that there are many ways in which information can be shared and presented this help decision making and also makes more links to maths, for example. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PowerPoint and as a Word document (from the TES website), which is then fully editable. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Planning editable
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Planning editable

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This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Planning the Enquiry and Starting to Consider which Type of Enquiry is Appropriate to Use and Why WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Enquiry Types editable
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Enquiry Types editable

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ set of support cards that set out the essence of each type of enquiry so the students can start to consider which one they should use and why. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Presenting Evidence editable
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in Enquiry and Investigation - Presenting Evidence editable

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This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: Making the Decision on the Most Appropriate Way of Presenting the Data Gathered, and Communicating what was Found Out. By sharing that there are many ways in which information can be shared and presented this help decision making and also makes more links to maths, for example. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in enquiry and Investigation - Using Secondary Sources Edit
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Being Scientific: Working Scientifically in enquiry and Investigation - Using Secondary Sources Edit

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This fully EDITABLE resource is for teachers as a teaching tool, but also as a self-assessment support type tool for students, when teaching science. In the Word form it can be used to print out cards for the students, in particular the second page which can be blown up to A3 for groups of students to plan their ideas, or as the PowerPoint it can run on the whiteboard to aid teaching. You can also download this resource as a PDF document from the TES website (cheaper!). SO WHAT DOES IT DO? When teaching science, it is the skills and the thinking scientifically that make a scientist, not the knowledge or facts that are gained. This resources (part of a set on ‘Being Scientific’) helps to not only identify the skills, but to support progression within each individual skill area, helping create more confident and competent scientists in the classroom. Although it fits well with the NC for England, because it is based on thinking skills, child development and Bloom's taxonomy, it simply good practice and can be used in a variety of contexts and countries. WHAT’S IN IT? The first slide in each section of the resource has the Being Scientific Cycle included: what could be called the 'Enquiry Cycle' of asking questions, deciding on an approach to answer the question, presenting what was discovered and then asking further questions. This is in essence what science is all about: asking questions and finding answers, then asking more questions! What follows is a ‘child friendly’ progressive set of support cards with initially simple cloze procedures, through to some key questions to consider for the skill being focussed on, helping students progress from the beginning of primary school through to early secondary years. This skill in this set is focussed on: How to use Research and use of Secondary Sources as part of progression in not only this skill but also within this type of enquiry. WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS? When planning lessons, focussing on an individual skill, in order to develop it further allows students to have more time to consider the WAGOLLs (What A Good One Looks Like) and how to refine this, without having to write everything for the whole investigation. This means that the students should only be writing up the skill being assessed. The rest of the process can be recorded in other ways such as photographs, listening to discussions, using floor books, etc. Obviously this also means more focussed marking (and less of it!) This resource is also available as a PDF document (from the TES website), which is priced cheaper. Contact me if you have any questions or to find out about other resources: tara@makingitpractical.com
Thinking and Enquiring Classroom
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Thinking and Enquiring Classroom

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. There are many tools and much research into thinking and how to use this in the classroom. Here as part of some work in a school to promote thinking and also enquiry in terms of science skills, I mapped the type of activities that fit with the TASC wheel, linked them back to science skills and to Being Scientific, a resource of mine the school was already using. This is food for thought for you and can be used in staff meetings to help get thinking into lessons in a less structure or forced way by showing that some of the activities we already do, fit into this idea. Try to use some activities in the staff meeting (if you run it as such) to illustrate what you mean.
Being Scientific: some activities for extension
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Tara_Lievesley

Being Scientific: some activities for extension

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. Sometimes we need some additional activities for students to explore but still to be linked to science. These can be a starting point of thinking for you to develop your own and then focus on a skill for the students to develop.
Science Self Assessment examples for scientific skills
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Tara_Lievesley

Science Self Assessment examples for scientific skills

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This and all my resources are a result of many years both independent and LA consultancy, support of other teachers in schools, delivering training and a passion for science and teaching in general. The first resource is more of a resource to help decide how you want students to carry out Self assessment. The 'How well are you doing' resource is linked to the grid I have uploaded previously, and the numbers are related loosely to year groups (although you can change these to perhaps be scientists names (which has worked well for me in the past) so that it is purely about progression). This resource is linked purely to skills for science.