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Allopatric & Sympatric Speciation

Allopatric & Sympatric Speciation

Loaded as part of a Lesson. Feel free to alter the Power Point as required to suit you. I get the pupils to describe what they see and then link the keyword to this. A mind map is provided for reinforcement/development - encourage pupils to find or add their own words when writing this up. A slide with useful words is provided on the Power Point and this can be displayed when pupils are completing their mind maps. A Mix and Match game has been added as a plenary.
martinpk
Growing Bundle! Native American Peoples

Growing Bundle! Native American Peoples

This bundle is small at the moment but it will grow! Grab a bargain at over 20% off these three resources. This bundle contains a lesson on the religions of the Native Plains Tribes, a source based enquiry on why Europeans went to he Americas in the 15th/16th centuries and a full GCSE standard lesson on the Native American Civil Rights Movement.
PerfidiaBlackheart
AQA new specification-Eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells-B1.3

AQA new specification-Eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells-B1.3

Eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 1.1.1 Relevant chapter: B1 Cell structure and transport. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 8-9 Specification requires students to know the following; Plant and animal cells (eukaryotic cells) have a cell membrane, cytoplasm and genetic material enclosed in a nucleus. Bacterial cells (prokaryotic cells) are much smaller in comparison. They have cytoplasm and a cell membrane surrounded by a cell wall. The genetic material is not enclosed in a nucleus. It is a single DNA loop and there may be one or more small rings of DNA called plasmids. Students should be able to demonstrate an understanding of the scale and size of cells and be able to make order of magnitude calculations, including the use of standard form. MS 1b, 2a, 2h WS 4.4 Use prefixes centi, milli, micro and nano.
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AQA new specification-Animal and plant cells-B1.2

AQA new specification-Animal and plant cells-B1.2

Animal and plant cells lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 1.1.2 Relevant chapter: B1 Cell structure and transport. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 6-7 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain how the main sub-cellular structures, including the nucleus, cell membranes, mitochondria, chloroplasts in plant cells and plasmids in bacterial cells are related to their functions. Most animal cells have the following parts: • a nucleus • cytoplasm • a cell membrane • mitochondria • ribosomes. In addition to the parts found in animal cells, plant cells often have: • chloroplasts • a permanent vacuole filled with cell sap. Plant and algal cells also have a cell wall made of cellulose, which strengthens the cell.
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AQA new specification-The world of the microscope-B1.1

AQA new specification-The world of the microscope-B1.1

The world of the microscope lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides. I have also included the required practical ppt as It goes hand in hand with this lesson. I would recommend doing the required practical after the plant and animal cells lesson. AQA spec link: 1.1.5 Relevant chapter: B1 Cell structure and transport. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 4-5 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to: • understand how microscopy techniques have developed over time • explain how electron microscopy has increased understanding of sub-cellular structures. Limited to the differences in magnification and resolution. An electron microscope has much higher magnification and resolving power than a light microscope. This means that it can be used to study cells in much finer detail. This has enabled biologists to see and understand many more sub-cellular structures. WS 1.1 Students should be able to carry out calculations involving magnification, real size and image size using the formula: magnification = size of image size of real object Students should be able to express answers in standard form if appropriate. MS 1a, 1b, 2h, 3b WS 4.4 Use prefixes centi, milli, micro and nano.
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AQA new specification-Discovering drugs-B6.3

AQA new specification-Discovering drugs-B6.3

Discovering drugs lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides. AQA spec link: 3.1.9 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating diseases. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 102-103 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to describe the process of discovery and development of potential new medicines, including preclinical and clinical testing. Traditionally drugs were extracted from plants and microorganisms. • The heart drug digitalis originates from foxgloves. • The painkiller aspirin originates from willow. • Penicillin was discovered by Alexander Fleming from the Penicillium mould. Most new drugs are synthesised by chemists in the pharmaceutical industry. However, the starting point may still be a chemical extracted from a plant.
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What was daily life like for slaves on a plantation? DBQ full lesson

What was daily life like for slaves on a plantation? DBQ full lesson

This lesson focuses on the primary evidence from the time to describe and explain what life was like for slaves on American plantations in the 19th century. The lesson begins with a desk jigsaw that the students must put together and attempt to work out the topic of the lesson. They then use the source material as a DBQ to identify, describe, explain and analyse. This works well to develop their historical skills. The lesson resources are differentiated by level of activity that match the respective lesson objectives and by the amount of resources they must use for the DBQ. You can use the same with the whole class or if you have a very widely varied ability level you can give out the relevant sheets to match each student. The top ability are encouraged throughout to consider a sources reliability based on the origin, nature and purpose. However, I think all students can begin to do this and evaluate the sources in front of them. Lesson contains: 1. Simple lesson plan 2. A 20 slide animated powerpoint with notes for teacher direction where needed. 3. 3 differentiated source DBQs with differentiated tasks. Thank you for looking
PerfidiaBlackheart
AQA new specification-Antibiotics and painkillers-B6.2

AQA new specification-Antibiotics and painkillers-B6.2

Antibiotics and Painkillers lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a quiz. Due to this being a very short topic, I decided to teach this over two lessons and included a role play activity, it was thoroughly enjoyed by all three year 10 classes. Please leave a review at the end of the lesson, let me know how the 'doctor, patient' role play is reciprocated :) AQA spec link: 3.1.8 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating diseases. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 100-101 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain the use of antibiotics and other medicines in treating disease. Antibiotics, such as penicillin, are medicines that help to cure bacterial disease by killing infective bacteria inside the body. It is important that specific bacteria should be treated by specific antibiotics. WS 1.4 The use of antibiotics has greatly reduced deaths from infectious bacterial diseases. However, the emergence of strains resistant to antibiotics is of great concern. There are links with this content to Culturing microorganisms (biology only). There are links with this content to Resistant bacteria. Antibiotics cannot kill viral pathogens. Painkillers and other medicines are used to treat the symptoms of disease but do not kill pathogens. It is difficult to develop drugs that kill viruses without also damaging the body’s tissues.
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AQA new specification-Vaccination-B6.1

AQA new specification-Vaccination-B6.1

Vaccination created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a separates class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a quiz. AQA spec link: 3.1.7 Relevant chapter: B6 Preventing and treating diseases. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 98-99 Specification requires students to know the following; Students should be able to explain how vaccination will prevent illness in an individual, and how the spread of pathogens can be reduced by immunising a large proportion of the population. Vaccination involves introducing small quantities of dead or inactive forms of a pathogen into the body to stimulate the white blood cells to produce antibodies. If the same pathogen re-enters the body the white blood cells respond quickly to produce the correct antibodies, preventing infection. Students do not need to know details of vaccination schedules and side effects associated with specific vaccines. WS 1.4 Evaluate the global use of vaccination in the prevention of disease
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Middle Ages: How did people FEEL before, during and after the Black Death?

Middle Ages: How did people FEEL before, during and after the Black Death?

This lesson aims to get students empathising with those that lived through the Medieval Black Death. They must put the events of the 1348 plague in the correct chronological order and then consider the emotions people would have felt at those different times. Each student has a set of emotion cards to hold up for each event. When I first taught this lesson I envisaged students holding up just one emotion card for each date and event but they surprised me with the complexity of their thinking and reasoning. Many students were able to use the emotions cards to explain how they might have conflicting emotions when, for example they hear rumours from the nearest town or when the plague has passed them by. Ultimately the students cut and stick the event cards in chronological order and then draw an emotion picture next to it to show how they would feel at each point. They should also write down AT LEAST one sentence explaining why they would feel this way. I use this lesson as preparation for writing their own historical fiction about the Black Death. It works well for character building and character motivation later on. It also helps students to think about cause and effect and the impact on individuals of major events. Lesson contains: 13 slide PowerPoint (print out as a handout to use the events slides as cards) 6 emotion 'cards' (one blank for the students to create their own) An example of student work to give an idea of outcome. Thanks for looking! ***************************************************************************** TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Ms-Hughes-Teaches You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. © A. Hughes (MsHughesTeaches)All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
Blind Date - Who should Queen Elizabeth I marry? Powerpoint and worksheet lesson

Blind Date - Who should Queen Elizabeth I marry? Powerpoint and worksheet lesson

This lesson can be used as part of a unit on British Monarchs, the Tudors, even Shakespeare or simply as a stand alone lesson. Queen Elizabeth I faced may problems when she came to the throne of England in 1558. The lack of money in the treasury, fear of attack and the issue of marriage. This lesson deals with who Elizabeth could or should marry. The powerpoint takes on the format of the television programme Blind Date (the Dating Game in the USA where one contestant must choose from three potential dates base don what they say. In this case Elizabeth I plays the bachelorette and is offered three men: -Charles Hatton -King Charles of Spain -Robert Dudley Earl of Leicester. -She also has another option to stay unmarried. The students have to decide in pairs or in groups, which choice she should make. I get some of my students to sit at the front on stools (like in the show) and read out the parts to start with and give it a bit of character! The lesson pack contains: - Fully Animated Powerpoint - Table worksheet to fill in aspects of each man - Information sheet on the four options (this could also be cut into separate cards for use in groups.) I hope your students find this as enjoyable and informative as mine do! Thanks for looking. ***************************************************************************** TERMS OF USE: This download (free or purchased) is for your own personal use in your classroom or your home. Please do not share my resources with others unless given explicit consent by me. Please direct them to my store instead. https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Store/Ms-Hughes-Teaches You may not share this download. You may not alter any item in this download, resell and claim as your own work. Similarly, you may not sell or share these resources with anyone and you may not use the contents of this download to create anything for commercial purposes or other commercial products. If you are an education board or school and would like to use my resources district wide, please contact me about licensing. © A. Hughes (MsHughesTeaches), 2014 All rights reserved.
PerfidiaBlackheart
AQA new specification-Screening genetic disorders-B13.10

AQA new specification-Screening genetic disorders-B13.10

Screening for genetic disorders lesson created in accordance to the NEW AQA Specification (9-1). Designed for a higher ability TRILOGY(combined science) class, although content can be adjusted to suit any ability. Includes: slide animations, embedded videos and practice questions with answers on slides as well as a quiz. This video contains many videos and is a great lesson to spark a debate. I'd appreciate a review after your lesson :) AQA spec link: 6.1.7 Relevant chapter: B13 Genetics and reproduction. AQA Biology third edition textbook-Page 214-215. Some disorders are inherited. These disorders are caused by the inheritance of certain alleles. • Polydactyly (having extra fingers or toes) is caused by a dominant allele. • Cystic fibrosis (a disorder of cell membranes) is caused by a recessive allele. Students should make informed judgements about the economic, social and ethical issues concerning embryo screening, given appropriate information. WS 1.3 Appreciate that embryo screening and gene therapy may alleviate suffering but consider the ethical issues which arise.
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