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Dr. Seuss Mock Trials

Dr. Seuss Mock Trials

Ever wanted your students to argue about something that will also teach them? What about taking a Dr. Seuss character to trial! Your students will be arguing about whether or not the Cat-in-the-Hat actually burglarized Sally's home or whether Horton committed kidnapping! It is perfect for motivating students to learn about persuasion, text evidence, inference, and debate. This unit contains a teacher guide, step by step pages for the students to think about: What is a criminal charge Prosecution vs. Defense How to show evidence Debating with a fair and balanced argument How to ask proper questions It also includes a complete script for students to fill in that shows a basic understanding of how a courtroom trial runs. The script follows actual procedures but adds a flair of "Seuss-like" dialogue. You will not be disappointed in the results of these mock trials.
houstonj2
Informational Texts - Reading Comprehension Worksheets - Bundle

Informational Texts - Reading Comprehension Worksheets - Bundle

This bundle includes different Reading Comprehension Worksheets suitable for higher intermediate advanced ESL learners. The texts explore different concepts, influential people and historical events. After carefully reading each informational text, students are required to complete some comprehension exercises including: questions, True or False, gap filling exercises, crosswords, word search exercises, matching exercises and engage in in-depth classroom discussions on topics relevant to each text. The vocabulary used in the texts is rather advanced and can also be used for IGSCE, TOEFL or IELTS vocabulary building purposes.
MariaPht
Factual and Legal Causation

Factual and Legal Causation

This resource discusses the concept of factual and legal causation by explaining the 'but for' test using relevant case examples i.e. Pagett; White; and Hughes and legal causation explaining the de minimis rule, intervening acts such as the actions of a third party and the victims own act. Attached is a worksheet for the students to complete whilst researching/discussing the cases that ties in with the presentation and for visual learners there is an opportunity for students to illustrate each case which is useful for recall/revision purposes. There is a link (the heading of the last slide) to a video of the decision given by the Supreme Court in the case of Hughes (2013). There are four scenarios included on the presentation that give students the opportunity to apply the rules of causation.
a.colgrave