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KS3 Baseline Assessment with DIRT tasks and Peer marking sheet

KS3 Baseline Assessment with DIRT tasks and Peer marking sheet

Included: PowerPoint for the lesson - assessment paper, mark scheme for peer marking, DIRT tasks for pupils to complete. Video used: I do not own nor claim to own the video inserted. Video is not 100% accurate but does illustrate the growth and migration of the World Religions clearly for KS3.
jbonn02
KS3 Miracles of Jesus

KS3 Miracles of Jesus

PowerPoint, starting activity and main activity sheets. Learners identify, explain and evaluate the miracles of Jesus. Opportunities for peer/self marking identified which should cut down on your marking load also!
jbonn02
Marriage and the Family. Religious Studies B Edexcel GCSE (9-1) WHOLE TOPIC. Beliefs in Action.

Marriage and the Family. Religious Studies B Edexcel GCSE (9-1) WHOLE TOPIC. Beliefs in Action.

This topic covers the whole specification of the MARRIAGE AND THE FAMILY focused on CHRISTIANITY while catering the scheme of work to allow access for all students. (Making it related to their lives). Easy to follow lessons that can be easily adapted. Lots of exam practice. Within this topic and what you will be buying in 9 good quality resources with some handouts that were made from scratch and have been taught and tested with 4 GCSE groups. All lessons have a exam question as a title - this then is answered at the end of the lesson to show progression over time using the knowledge they have learnt throughout the lesson. Resources cover: Marriage Sexual relationships. Families Support for the family in the local parish. Family planning (contraception) Divorce and remarriage. Equality of men and women in the family. Gender prejudice and discrimination. Within: Lessons and hand-outs (within slides and individually). 1 - Explain two reasons why marriage is important to Christians. 2 - ‘No children should have sex before marriage’. 3 - ‘Homosexuals should not be allowed to have children’. 4 - Explain two reasons why family life is important to Christians. 5 - Explain two reasons why supporting families is important to Christians. 6 - ‘Christians should be more accepting of divorce’. 7 - Explain two different Christian beliefs about contraception. 8 - Explain two reasons why Christians have different views about the equality of men and women. 9 - Explain two reasons why some Christians oppose the ordination of women.
sam_512
What is wonderful about the Earth?

What is wonderful about the Earth?

How confusing are optical illusions ? What makes you go “Wow”? What fills you with Awe and Wonder? Fully resourced lesson and powerpoint examining some of these fascinating insights into the world in which we live. Makes reference to religious teachings about how humans should treat the world. Includes valuable David Attenborough video to use to encourage students to link religious teachings to explicit geographical areas and dilemmas from the world in which we live. Part of the Religion and Planet series of lessons.
hundredacre15
What about the origins and importance of life?

What about the origins and importance of life?

Useful lesson exploring some of the issues concerning religious stories about the Creation of the world with a particular emphasis upon how important life is. Lesson is fully resourced with activities, moments for reflection and debate/discussion. Ideal for non examination lesson at KS4 or KS3. Part of Religion and Planet Earth series of lessons.
hundredacre15
Aesop's Fables:  ‘The Trees and the Axe’ (Week 12/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘The Trees and the Axe’ (Week 12/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Aesop's Fables:  ‘The Wind and the Sun’ (Week 11/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘The Wind and the Sun’ (Week 11/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Aesop's Fables:  ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ (Week 10/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ (Week 10/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Aesop's Fables:  ‘Brother and Sister’ (Week 9/12)

Aesop's Fables: ‘Brother and Sister’ (Week 9/12)

Religious and Moral Education – previously delivered to Year 7 What? A lesson designed to engage individuals or groups with moderate learning difficulties and delivered through story-telling using Religious and/or Moral Education materials that are included to download. Objectives The lesson plans incorporate a progression of academic learning and personal development including self-esteem and confidence. Referring to stories offers layers of education and experience. In its simplest form a story can be interesting, funny, relaxing or just enjoyable. The individual may experience deeper or greater learning either through listening alone or engaging in discussion. Many examples can be found in stories of how people live and the impact their behaviours have. Young people are invited to explore and discuss such examples and reflect on their own behaviour. Young people are then able to choose and make informed decisions regarding their own lives. Where? To be delivered in a comfortable, relaxed environment, free from interruption. For maximum engagement, young people need to feel safe and secure to be able to trust their surroundings and feel acceptable. How? Boundaries of expectations from group members must be discussed, for example; listening to others without interruption, respecting others’ opinions, speaking politely. Allow silence from those seeking only to listen – they are still learning. Any answer (offered with respect) is acceptable and can be used to further discussion. Learning Outcomes Physical; • listening and speaking, reading, fine motor skills, visual assimilation and transformation of the written word from varying distances, Cognitive processes; • awareness, perception, reasoning and judgment. Social; • develop and maintain positive relationships with peers, authority and others. Emotional; • awareness of self and others and how to deal with feelings. Behaviour; • recognise acceptable and inappropriate behavior to evaluate and determine appropriate and acceptable responses. Titles for the Term Include: Week 1 ‘The Fox without a Tail’ Week 2 ‘The Shepherd Boy and The Wolf’. Week 3 ‘The Boastful Traveller’ Week 4 ‘The Crow and the Fox’ Week 5 ‘Who will Bell the Cat’ Week 6 ‘Crow and the Swan’ Week 7 ‘The Wolf and the Lamb’ Week 8 ´The Lion and the Hare´ Week 9 ‘Brother and Sister’ Week 10 ‘The Goose that Laid the Golden Eggs’ Week11 ‘The Wind and the Sun’ Week12 ‘The Trees and the Axe’
barbaramcn
Augustine - The Problem of Evil

Augustine - The Problem of Evil

This resources is an A Level topic however I created this lesson as a challenge for my KS3 Yr8 class - they loved it! It is interactive and pushes students to think philosophically. Playdough model activity (optional!) Introduction to Augustine Step by step guide to Augustine’s solution Progress checks throughout Challenging questions
HannahP1191