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Kodu Game Lab Tutorial Series

Kodu Game Lab Tutorial Series

Kodu is an excellent tool to teach pupils the basics of programming and algorithms. In my video tutorial course, I have broken down a wide range of skills and put them into short, easy to follow videos. Whilst the videos are part of a greater package I use for teaching Kodu and in particular programming, algorithms and problem decomposition / solving, I am happy for everyone to use the videos free of charge. I upload new videos each week, with the aim of creating a 12 - 14 lesson series. This tutorial series is aimed at KS3 pupils and has wide ranging differentiation opportunities.
staffgca
Python: File handling

Python: File handling

This resource contains a PowerPoint that goes through the basics and fundamentals of file handling in Python 3, including repl.it examples and templates for students to use to advance their programming skill and technique.
mro2013
Understanding Python Programs

Understanding Python Programs

A word document containing 5 programming challenges - students have to complete the program and/or comment to explain what is going on. The aim of this document is to encourage students to explain what some blocks of code/statements are used for in a program, as well as applying their knowledge of syntax to code used to solve a problem. In this document, I include repl.it - as a resource, this is incredibly useful for collaborative workspaces online in ANY language!
mro2013
KS4 Computing Baseline Test

KS4 Computing Baseline Test

This is a test you can give to students who about to start their GCSE in Computer Science. It should provide you with an insight into the progress they have made in KS3.
edulitolearn
Differentiated Turtle activities: Python and  Computational Thinking

Differentiated Turtle activities: Python and Computational Thinking

Age: KS3 Learning Objectives: Be able to identify code that performs a specific task Be able to modify code to suit your needs Be able to show how pieces of code can be combined Description: Students use the Python Turtle library to create a car. The activity also discusses how to decompose the task, key programming points and useful debugging strategies. The second part of the activity ask students to use what they have created to develop the code to draw a house. Files: KS3 Python Turtles Iteration.pptx (Uses iteration to draw the images) KS3 Python Turtles Procedures.pptx (Uses procedures to draw the images)
thecsroom
KS3 Computational Thinking Bundle

KS3 Computational Thinking Bundle

This bundle combines all my KS3 focused computational thinking resource. This bundle includes the following resources: 1. Computational thinking for KS3 2. Computational thinking problem solving 3. Application of computational thinking - create an interactive story 4. Computational thinking classroom ideas posters
RobbotResources
Tkinter Basics in Python

Tkinter Basics in Python

In this pack I've included three lessons and a workbook to get students into the basics of Tkinter - using widgets, creating menus, and using internal variables to create an input/output system with their widgets. The pack is generally aimed at A Level students, however the syntax is rather basic, so this could be used for ANY students - i.e. GCSE Students for their NEA would be able to show great competency and skill in programming by using a GUI instead of an MDI
mro2013
Application of Computational Thinking - Create an Interactive Story

Application of Computational Thinking - Create an Interactive Story

This unit of work introduces students (I use this with year 7) to the concepts of computational thinking and logical thinking. It is split into three fully differentiated sections: 1. Design an interactive story using a flowchart to identify the key decision points within your story. 2. Create an interactive story using PowerPoint, hyperlinking the slides to the correct locations. 3. Test and evaluate your story and make improvements where required. I have included some slides to provide additional assistance, for example hyperlinking auto shapes, removing the on mouse click advancements, etc. Alongside developing computational thinking skills, this unit is also an opportunity for students to develop their graphic design skills. I have also included an example interactive story so students can get an idea of what they could create themselves, while considering what they could make even better themselves. This resource is a perfect continuation from my Introduction Computational Thinking for KS3 resource! ***Please Leave a Review***
RobbotResources
Algorithms, decomposition and abstraction - AQA GCSE Computer Science 9-1 KS3 Year 9 Intro

Algorithms, decomposition and abstraction - AQA GCSE Computer Science 9-1 KS3 Year 9 Intro

This small unit covers the first topic of the AQA 9-1 GCSE Computer Science course, which can be taught to Year 9 (or any KS3 group) covering algorithms, decomposition and abstraction - this is a useful learning tool to introduce KS3 students to the idea of algorithms, and how they work, to ease them into GCSE concepts. The unit is aimed at Year 9, however it can be taught to Year 8 (or even to Year 7!) as well. Beyond Year 9, this unit could be very useful for Year 10 students when revising for the NEA/for their exam.
mro2013
Using functions and creating a Tkinter GUI interface in Python

Using functions and creating a Tkinter GUI interface in Python

21 quick, simple challenges covering using functions and two documents on how to use Tkinter to create a GUI interface. Includes explanation, example code and suggested possible answers. A BONUS “Chunky Challenge” included allowing your students to practice these skills in a larger task to prepare for more complex tasks that involve computational thinking skills. In order to get the most out of these documents I recommend you use them in the following order: functions, GUI part 1, GUI part 2 and finally the chunky challenge. From my experience in teaching Python and other programming languages, I feel it works best when pupils only learn about using functions when they are starting to create more advanced programs that require them. For this reason, this document does assume a lot of previous confidence with using Python's basic programming structure before they tackle this section. If you are a teacher who likes to introduce functions early on in the pupils programming experience, then the functions document will not work in your classroom as it assumes pupils have a confidence with the basic programming skills already in order to complete the challenges. The skills the pupils must already have confidence with include: • input • print • if statements • loops (for and while) • strings • mathematical operators • tuples and lists • saving to and reading from a text file • saving to and reading from a .csv file For more lessons and complete units of work visit www.nicholawilkin.com.
nwilkin