Dicing with Grammar
Dicing with Grammar
4.647222222222222175 reviews

It's simple really: English grammar can be a very dry subject, but this need not be the case. For a few years now, I have been developing a games-based approach to teaching important grammar concepts. It is amazing how the introduction of dice takes the learning into a new place - the element of chance making it seem less like work and more like play. Because I test my games extensively in the classroom, I get a feel for what works. Dump your boring worksheets and start dicing with grammar.

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There are two useful resources here:
1. A carefully planned lesson about parentheses using dashes, exploring how different types of extra information can be added to a sentence. This includes a detailed lesson plan and 3 activities (the final one is a team game, with clear differentiation). All resources are included. The lesson covers these Year 5/Year 6 objectives:
I understand the terms dash and parenthesis/parentheses;
I can explain some uses for parentheses;
I can use parentheses creatively for lots of different purposes.
This is perfect for a demonstration lesson or an observed session. There is minimal ‘teacher talk’ and lots of active pupil engagement.

2. I have also included a further punctuation game: ‘Punctuation show-offs’.
I can use brackets, dashes (parentheses) and semi-colons in my sentences.
Would you like the writers in your class to be ‘punctuation show-offs’? Me too. I created this dice activity to encourage children to add extra information to sentences using parentheses (brackets and dashes) and also to separate closely related main clauses using semi-colons.

I have also provided teacher and - more importantly - child friendly explanations and examples of all concepts.

Children may incidentally find out about Usain Bolt, Picasso, Stephen Hawking and a 1000kg bowl of cereal. Have I caught your interest yet?

This whole activity has a ‘show-off’ theme and it’s fun. After playing this, you can remind your class to be ‘punctuation show-offs’ in their own writing.

Finally, I have added a ‘Victorian’ version of the same game, to show how it can be adapted to different themes.

Review

5

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ems04

4 years ago
5

I found this resource really useful and liked the fact it is very interactive and my pupils really responded well to it! I really recommend any of resources created by Extra golden time! Do you have any resources even paid ones for adverbs and a stand alone creative writing lessons for Year 5?

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$5.00