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Miss Porter's KS3 English Resource Shop

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Before having children I was Head of KS3 English at a secondary school in Lincolnshire. I thoroughly enjoyed my time as a teacher and I loved planning lessons and creating exciting resources.

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Before having children I was Head of KS3 English at a secondary school in Lincolnshire. I thoroughly enjoyed my time as a teacher and I loved planning lessons and creating exciting resources.
KS3 English - Newspaper Journalism Writing Scheme of Work - Writing to Inform - 8 Lessons
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KS3 English - Newspaper Journalism Writing Scheme of Work - Writing to Inform - 8 Lessons

(5)
Before becoming an English teacher, I was a journalist. I used my skills and knowledge gained there to create a scheme of work to teach students about how language is used in news writing. The SOW proved very successful with Year 9 students of varying abilities. The SOW is 8-10 lessons long, depending on your students' ability. It leads up to students writing their own news article using the skills gained in the SOW. The SOW uses the following learning objectives in its lessons: LESSON 1 To understand how newspapers use layout LESSON 2 To compare and contrast online and printed newspapers LESSON 3 To explore the power of images in newspapers LESSON 4: To understand more about the language of types of newspaper writing LESSON 5 To explore the way newspaper stories are structured LESSON 6 To identify and understand emotive language, and its effect on readers. LESSON 7 To understand how to write clearly, concisely and correctly. LESSON 8 To understand how to put a whole article together
Michael Morpurgo War Horse Scheme of Work WW1 - KS2 OR KS3 Year 7 - 8 SOW - 14 Lessons
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Michael Morpurgo War Horse Scheme of Work WW1 - KS2 OR KS3 Year 7 - 8 SOW - 14 Lessons

(2)
This SOW was created for Year 7 students of varying abilities. It contains 14 lessons with accompanying resources. The SOW has the following reading, writing and speaking & listening assessments: READING - Explore the relationship between one of the characters and the horse Joey. WRITING - Students are to describe a picture using the senses and one simile or metaphor. SPEAKING & LISTENING - Dramatic performance of a scene from War Horse. The SOW takes students through these learning objectives: LESSON 1 To be able to engage with the key theme of war in the novel To understand the main points about the historical context of the novel LESSON 2 To understand life on a farm in the early 1900s To develop inference skills LESSON 3 To be able to describe character To be able to make comparison To revise the use of connectives to compare LESSON 4 To understand the term ‘points of view’ To be able to compare points of view To be able to rewrite from an alternative point of view LESSON 5 To be able to analyse and describe a setting To develop descriptive writing skills LESSON 6 To develop inference skills LESSON 7 To be able to take different roles in speaking and listening tasks To develop drama skills LESSON 7.5 To be able to take different roles in speaking and listening tasks To develop drama skills LESSON 8 To be able to make links between objects, events and characters To be able to track themes and make logical links LESSON 9 To develop analysis skills To develop the ability to write about language To develop the ability to write about the words chosen by the writer LESSON 10 To be able to explain the relationships between characters LESSON 11 To be able to read independently To develop analysis skills LESSON 12 To assess students’ ability to make inferences about characters LESSON 13-14
KS3 ENGLISH Assessment Student Friendly Sub-level Descriptors - Reading/Writing/Speaking & Listening
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KS3 ENGLISH Assessment Student Friendly Sub-level Descriptors - Reading/Writing/Speaking & Listening

(3)
Sheets for students to stick in their books or for teachers to display in their classrooms that describe requirements for levels and sub-levels in reading, writing and speaking and listening. An accessible resource that allows students to take responsibility for their own progress. It's also a helpful resource for teachers when setting targets. Students find their level on the sheet and they can then look to the next level where it says 'To get a level 5b, I need to...' Also included is a marking key sheet for students to stick in their books to enable teachers to state the particular markers they use to marks students' books. Also, a personal target sheet for students to self-assess their ability at the start of the year. Students may review this at different times of the year to assess their own progress. There's also a target record sheet for students to keep in the front of their exercise books to keep a record of their targets. The idea is that they start filling in their targets from the bottom of the sheet so they're effectively climbing "the ladder" and making progress. Students should regularly review the sheet with their teacher to assess whether they're meeting their targets and whether their NC level is improving over time.
KS3 English - Poetry - A Case of Murder by Vernon Scannell - Lesson - Analysis
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KS3 English - Poetry - A Case of Murder by Vernon Scannell - Lesson - Analysis

(0)
This lesson takes students through Vernon Scannell's poem A Case of Murder. First, students are presented with the First Two Lines from their poem. Place these are students desks before they enter. They're to think about the poem and what it could be about. Next, present students with Gap-fill Poem where they are urged to fill in the gaps in the poem. This helps them to engage with the content and really think about the language of the poem. Feedback. Issue the complete poem. Discuss initial thoughts. Go through the activities in the PPT, which includes quick questions, in-depth question, discussion on themes, emotional response and then a contextual-based homework.
KS3 Inference and deduction -  Students working as detectives on Roald Dahl's Lamb to the Slaughter
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KS3 Inference and deduction - Students working as detectives on Roald Dahl's Lamb to the Slaughter

(1)
Students work as detectives investigating a crime scene based on Roald Dahl's short story Lamb to the Slaughter. There are two lessons included with the learning objective 'To select, understand and describe evidence; To interpret information and develop explanations.' These lessons have proved hugely successful and fun for students. They absolutely love walking into the classroom to see a crime scene and it's amazing to see even the most disruptive of students get completely into character. There's a little preparation involved in these lessons, but you and your students will reap the benefits.
KS3 / KS4 Analysis of Story Openings - Creative Writing, Descriptive Writing
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KS3 / KS4 Analysis of Story Openings - Creative Writing, Descriptive Writing

(0)
A 30-minute activity for students to understand what makes a great story opening. Students analyse some of the world's most renown story openings, they identify what's effective about them and then they use their new-found knowledge to craft their own enticing story opening. There are 13 story openings including The Lovely Bones, Orwell's 1984, Jane Eyre and The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time - a real mix for students to get their teeth into. I dare say this activity may encourage some students to read the books after being drawn in by some of the openings.
KS3 English - Reading - Urban Legends - Reading, Analysing and then Writing Urban Legends - FUN!
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KS3 English - Reading - Urban Legends - Reading, Analysing and then Writing Urban Legends - FUN!

(0)
Play ‘Halloween’ music as students walk in. Display ‘Urban Legends’ PowerPoint. Show students the definitions of ‘urban’ and ‘legend’. Students are to attempt to work out what an urban legend is with reference to the definitions. Pair-share. Introduce L.O. Ask students to write date, title and L.O. in their exercise books. Look at the conventions of an Urban Legend. Explain Def. – conventions - a rule, method or feature of a particular piece of writing) Establish what an urban legend is. Show students the short video of ‘Diet Coke and Mentos’. Switch off the lights and use torch to read the urban legend 'Killer on the Back Seat'. Students will find it pretty creepy! Split the class into groups. Distribute the Urban Legends and ask one member from each group to read an urban legend aloud. After groups have read an urban legend, request whole-class feedback. Ask students to state the common features of an urban legend. Display ‘How to write your own Urban Legend’ slide. Discuss the conventions of an urban legend in preparation for students to write their own. Ask students, in pairs, to discuss their initial ideas for two minutes. Using slide 6, students are to start writing their own Urban Legend. It should be no longer than 4 paragaphs and should take no longer than 3-4 minutes to read. Students to finish for homework.
KS2 KS3 PUNCTUATION Plurals Starter - Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? - Competitive, Fun
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KS2 KS3 PUNCTUATION Plurals Starter - Who Wants To Be A Millionaire? - Competitive, Fun

(0)
Here's a fun plurals starter with a competitive element - bound to engage the boys! In 'Who Wants to be a Millionaire?' style, this activity asks students to pluralise different words. As the monetary amount increases, the words get more and more difficult. For example, the £100 word is 'face', the £16,000 is 'goose', the £125,000 word is 'quiz' and the £1,000,000 is 'ox'. There are two versions of the game to play on two separate occasions; the second round takes students from 'house' (£100) to 'stimulus' (£1,000,000). This is a fun, competitive starter that engages students in plurals - incredible!
AQA English Literature Paper 1 - Macbeth - Revision How to Respond to an Exam Question - 1 x Lesson
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AQA English Literature Paper 1 - Macbeth - Revision How to Respond to an Exam Question - 1 x Lesson

(0)
This lesson takes students through how to respond to an exam question. The question is: Starting with this speech, explain how far you think Shakespeare presents Lady Macbeth as a powerful woman. Write about: • how Shakespeare presents Lady Macbeth in this speech • how Shakespeare presents Lady Macbeth in the play as a whole Students explore the play where Lady Macbeth is featured. They highlight/annotate the exam question and speech. They then read through other parts of the play and pick out important quotations for their 'quotations' bank. Students also complete a PEE-based essay plan throughout the lesson in preparation for writing a whole response. Students also consider the assessment objectives. On the PowerPoint there are 'notes' at the bottom of each slide for guidance on how to conduct the lesson.
KS3 Descriptive Writing - Writing to Describe Lesson - Creative, Fun Exercise
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KS3 Descriptive Writing - Writing to Describe Lesson - Creative, Fun Exercise

(0)
Do ‘Starter Activity for Descriptive Writing’; this should put students in the right mind-set for descriptive writing. This activity should encourage students to tune into their senses, which is an essential skill for writing descriptively. Ideally, students should use mini whiteboards, but if these are not available, then exercise books are satisfactory. Hand-out ‘An Example of Writing to Describe’ sheet. Ask students, in pairs, to read it through and highlight – in different colours – the words and sentences that relate to the five senses. Recap the five senses – sight, sound, smell, touch, taste. Feedback. Ask students why description is important. Hand-out ‘Planning Sheet for Descriptive Writing’. Explain that, as it is a planning sheet, it does not matter if they alter or change their ideas throughout. They are to write about a place or event, perhaps building on the ideas they established in the starter activity. Students could write up their piece of descriptive writing as a writing assessment.
KS3 / GCSE English Literature AQA Paper 1 -  Macbeth - Essay Reading Question - Tragic Hero
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KS3 / GCSE English Literature AQA Paper 1 - Macbeth - Essay Reading Question - Tragic Hero

(0)
This resource offers a reading question, an essay plan and key word definitions. This essay was used as the reading assessment for a high ability Year 9 group studying Shakespeare's Macbeth. Essay Question: Starting with this speech, explain how far you think Shakespeare presents Macbeth as a tragic hero. Assessment Objectives A01 – Maintain a critical style and develop an informed personal response, and use textual references, including quotations, to support and illustrate interpretations. A02 – Analyse language, form and structure used by a writer to create meanings and effects, using relevant subject terminology where appropriate A03 – Show understanding of the contexts in which texts were written A04 – Use a range of vocabulary and sentence structures for clarity, purpose and effect, with accurate spelling and punctuation.
KS4 English - Of Mice and Men - Understanding the Cyclical Nature of the Novella
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KS4 English - Of Mice and Men - Understanding the Cyclical Nature of the Novella

(0)
Of Mice and Men Much of the plot in the novel is cyclical, as are the lives of the characters. The story opens and closes in the same place, the men’s lives are a routine of work - earn money - spend money in the flop-house - work, and many of the chapters begin and end in similar ways. There are lots of examples of foreshadowing in Of Mice and Men. Steinbeck uses this technique to suggest that the characters couldn’t have avoided their fates – their destinies are inevitable. The task this resource offers is for students to look below the surface of the text and interpret how Steinbeck is offering clues about what will happen later on in the novel. I am looking for some original responses.