CRACKING hydrocarbons

CRACKING hydrocarbons

A fully-resourced lesson which looks at the chemical reaction of cracking and the conditions that are needed for this reaction on both an industrial scale and in a laboratory. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (33 slides) and an associated worksheet containing questions for a progress check. The lesson begins by challenging the students to use their knowledge of alkanes and a given example to work out the name of a 6, 7 and 8 carbon alkane. Students need to be able to name the alkanes and alkenes in order to understand the products of a cracking reaction. A number of quiz competitions are used to introduce both the name of the reaction but also the temperature that is needed when it is carried out on an industrial scale. Students will then be shown a diagram of a cracking experiment in a laboratory so they can discover that a catalyst is also needed. Students will learn, either through carrying out the experiment or through the informative slide, that the product of a cracking reaction is a smaller alkane molecule and a smaller alkene molecule. Time is taken to go back over the meaning of saturated and unsaturated and once the students have been introduced to bromine water, they are challenged to work out what the respective reactions will be when it is added to an alkane and an alkene. The remainder of the lesson focuses on writing word and chemical symbol equations for a cracking reaction. Students will be shown how the second product of a reaction can be worked out when the reactant and first product are provided and then they challenge themselves by trying to write three equations. Understanding checks are written into the lesson at regular places to allow the students to check on their understanding. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students.
GJHeducation
Titrations

Titrations

A resourced lesson which looks at the key details of a titration to enable students to generate results which could be used in a titration calculation. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (29 slides) and an associated worksheet. The lesson begins with a spot of fun as students are challenged to read the script of a scene from Friends to identify a neutralisation reaction. Students will learn that a method called a titration can use the results of an acid-base neutralisation to work out the concentration of an unknown. Students will learn the names of the equipment involved through a quiz competition and will then be shown how to set up a table to collect the results. Key terms such as titre, rough and end-point are explained. The lesson finishes with one further round of the competition called “Take the HOTSEAT” so that the knowledge of the key terminology from today’s lesson can be checked. The lesson has been designed with regular progress checks throughout so that students can check their understanding. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students.
GJHeducation
Covalent DOT AND CROSS DIAGRAMS

Covalent DOT AND CROSS DIAGRAMS

A concise lesson presentation (21 slides) which uses a range of methods to allow students to discover how to draw dot and cross diagrams for covalent structures. The lesson begins by challenging the students to recall their knowledge of electronic structure to show the outer shell of two specified atoms. They will then see how it is possible for both of these atoms to get full outer shells by sharing as happens in this type of bonding. A few more examples are used to consolidate this understanding before quick competition is used to check the understanding so far. Moving forwards, a step by step guide shows students how to draw dot and cross diagrams using the same techniques as was utilised with the hulas. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but could be used with higher ability KS3 students.
GJHeducation
Fractional distillation of crude oil

Fractional distillation of crude oil

An engaging lesson presentation (46 slides) which looks at the fractional distillation of crude oil and focuses on the properties of the different fractions. The aim at the start of the lesson is to ensure that students understand that this process can be broken down into evaporation followed by condensation. Moving forwards, a fun competition is used to introduce the students to the names of some of the important fractions that are produced by this process. At the same time, they will learn the relative position that each fraction condenses on the fractionating column and will be taught that they need to know this position with relation to the other fractions. Students will learn that the fractions have differing properties depending on where they condense and they are challenged to compare fractions by viscosity, length of hydrocarbon and boiling point. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson to allow the students to check on their understanding. This lesson has been written for GCSE students.
GJHeducation
Polymers

Polymers

A concise lesson presentation (19 slides) which looks at meaning of the key term, polymers, and briefly explores addition and condensation polymers. The lesson begins with a fun exercise to enable students to come up with the word polymers so that they can be introduced to the definition and then relate this to another term, monomers. A quiz competition is used to introduce addition and condensation polymers. Students are shown the displayed formulae and names of a few addition polymers and then challenged to use this to name and draw some others. They will then learn how DNA is an example of a condensation polymer. A set homework is included in the lesson which gets students to research thermosetting and thermosoftening polymers
GJHeducation
Forming IONS

Forming IONS

A fully-resourced lesson which explores how ions are formed from atoms. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (33 slides) and an associated worksheet to be used during an understanding check. The first part of the lesson focuses on atoms and specifically on getting students to recall that they contains the same number of protons and electrons and this is why they have no charge. By ensuring that they are confident with this fact, they will be able to understand why ions have a charge. Students will learn that ions have full outer shells of electrons and this change in the number of this sub-atomic particle leads to the charge. They are shown examples with aluminium and oxygen and then challenged to apply this new-found knowledge to a task where they have to explain how group 1, 2, 5 and 7 atoms become ions. The final part of the lesson looks at how ion knowledge can be assessed in a question as they have to recognise the electron configuration of one and describe how many sub-atomic particles are found in different examples. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson to allow the students to check on their understanding. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but could be used with higher ability KS3 students who are looking to extend their knowledge past basic atomic structure
GJHeducation
Nanoparticles

Nanoparticles

An informative lesson presentation (24 slides) that looks at the relative size of the nanoparticles and explains why they are so effective for a range of purposes. The lesson begins by looking at exactly how small nanoparticles are and ensures that students can recognise this size in a range of ways, including standard form. Moving forwards, in order to help students to understand why these nanoparticles are being used in a lot of different ways, students are introduced to bulk materials. Included in the remainder of the lesson is calculating the surface area to volume ratio so this can be used as a comparison point. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson so that students can assess their understanding. This lesson has been written for GCSE students.
GJHeducation
Formulae of ionic compounds

Formulae of ionic compounds

An engaging and informative lesson presentation (43 slides) that shows students how to write accurate chemical formulae for ionic compounds. In order to write accurate chemical formulae, students need to know the charges of the ions involved. For this reason, the lesson begins by reminding students how they can use the Periodic Table to work out the charge of the charged atoms. Students are shown how they can use these ion charges to write the formula and then are given the opportunity to apply this to a number of examples. Moving forwards, students are shown how some formulae need to contain brackets. The lesson finishes with a competition called “Ye Olde Chemical Formula Shop” where students get points if they are the first to work out the formula of a given substance. This lesson has been written for GCSE students.
GJHeducation
Electronic configurations

Electronic configurations

A fully-resourced lesson which guides students through drawing, writing and recognising the electronic configurations of atoms and ions. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (33 slides), an associated worksheet and a competition worksheet. The lesson begins by introducing the students to the number of electrons that can be held on the first three electron shells. They are then shown how to draw an electronic configuration and write this in brackets form. Students are given the opportunity to apply this knowledge by drawing the configuration of first 20 elements of the Periodic Table. Moving forwards, students are guided to enable them to discover how the electron configuration is linked to the position of an atom in the Periodic Table. The remainder of the lesson focuses on ions and how the configuration of these substances can be recognised. Some time is taken to explain how ions are formed from atoms and the lesson finishes with a competition which challenges students to identify atoms or ions from their configurations to form a word. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson to allow the students to check on their understanding and a range of quiz competitions to maintain engagement. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but could be used with younger students, especially the initial part of the lesson on atoms and the link to the Periodic Table
GJHeducation
Calculating masses in reactions

Calculating masses in reactions

A fully-resourced lesson which guides students through using moles to calculate the mass of a substance in a reaction. The lesson includes a detailed lesson presentation (22 slides) and associated worksheets which are used to check the skills and understanding of the students. The lesson begins by introducing the students to the three steps involved in a calculating mass question. These skills include calculating the relative formula mass and identifying molar ratios in equations to calculate amounts so time is taken to recap on how this is done before students are given the opportunity to try some progress check questions. A worked example brings these three steps together to guide the students to the final answer. The final task involves 4 questions where students are challenged to apply their new-found knowledge. This lesson has been written for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK)
GJHeducation
The Haber Process

The Haber Process

A fully-resourced lesson which looks at the gaseous reversible reaction known as the Haber Process and then explores and explains why the specific conditions are chosen for this reaction. The lesson includes a detailed lesson presentation (29 slides) and associated worksheets which are differentiated. The lesson begins by challenging the students to use a description of the reaction to complete the balanced symbol equation. A quiz competition involving both Chemistry and Maths skills is used to reveal the temperature and pressure which are chosen for this reaction. Students will learn that this only produces a yield of 30% and therefore are encouraged to question why these conditions are chosen. In doing so, they are made to wear two “hats”, so that they consider it from both a Science angle but also a business angle. Their knowledge of reversible reactions and the effect of changing either the temperature or the pressure on the position of the equilibrium are constantly challenged and then checked through a range of progress check questions. As a result of this lesson, students will understand that these conditions are a compromise and be able to explain why. This lesson has been designed for GCSE students (14 - 16 year olds in the UK).
GJHeducation
Writing WORD EQUATIONS

Writing WORD EQUATIONS

A resourced lesson which guides students through the method of writing word equations for a range of different chemical reactions. The lesson includes an engaging and informative lesson presentation (33 slides) and an associated worksheet containing questions. The lesson begins by reminding students of the form which word equations take, with the reactants chemically changing into the products. Moving forwards, time is taken to show students how to work out the name of a compound that contains either 2 or 3 elements. This moves nicely into the reaction of acids and how to name the salt that is produced. Students are shown the general formula for the reactions of acids with a metal, a metal carbonate and a metal oxide or hydroxide so that they can form word equations for each of these reactions in the progress check task. The final section of the lesson introduces reversible reactions to the students and shows them the symbol that is used in these word equations to replace the arrow. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson to allow the students to check on their understanding and thorough explanations of the required answers. This lesson has been written for GCSE students but is perfectly suitable for KS3 students too.
GJHeducation
Writing chemical symbol equations

Writing chemical symbol equations

A fully-resourced lesson which uses a step-by-step guide to show students how to write fully balanced symbol equations. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (38 slides) and associated worksheets containing questions which iaredifferentiated. The lesson begins by talking the students through the three steps involved in writing a chemical symbol equation. The first step involves writing in the formula for the elements. Students are introduced to the term, diatomic, and shown the 8 molecules that have to be written as a pair of atoms. Moving forwards, students are shown how to write chemical formulae for ionic compounds. They are reminded of how to use the group of the Periodic Table to work out the ion charge and how this is crucial when writing the formula. They are also shown how to write formulae which include brackets which is necessary when the charged molecules are involved. Finally, students are reminded of the rules of balancing symbol equations. There are progress checks at each stage so that students can assess their understanding and any misconceptions can be be addressed immediately. Time is taken to talk about state symbols, in case the exam question requires these to be included in the equation. The final section of the lesson involves students bringing their new-found skills together to write symbol equations for a range of reactions, including a neutralisation and reversible reaction. This task is differentiated so that students who need a little bit of assistance can still access the work. This lesson has been written for GCSE students (14-16 year olds in the UK)
GJHeducation
The ALKANES

The ALKANES

A fully-resourced lesson which looks at the saturated hydrocarbons known as the alkanes and focuses on their structure and reactions. The lesson includes an engaging lesson presentation (38 slides) and an associated worksheet which is differentiated. The lesson begins with the introduction of the name of this group and then a step-by-step guide is used to show students how to draw the displayed formula. Once the first four have been drawn, students are shown how to calculate the general formula for the alkenes and then challenged to do the same for the alkanes. Moving forwards, students will meet the key term, saturated, and time is taken to ensure that the meaning of this word is understood in the context of this lesson. Once they have been introduced to bromine water, students are challenged to work out what will happen when this substance is added to an alkane and they have to explain their answer. The remainder of the lesson looks at the complete and incomplete combustion of the alkanes, focusing on the different products of these reactions and specifically the problems associated with carbon monoxide. There are regular progress checks throughout the lesson to allow the students to check on their understanding.
GJHeducation
Context Posters on lab safety

Context Posters on lab safety

This Key Stage 3 resource is part of the JACOSA scheme. This story based learning project provides students with a compelling learning experience that is designed to put learning into context. The posters are often used at the beginning of lessons to excite learning. Teachers can plan lessons around the story. In this project, professor Charles Hobbles has been found dead in his science laboratory and a lot of money has been stolen from out of his safe. Pupils train to be forensic scientists and then investigate what and who killed the professor. This project has an exploratory and practical nature to it and provides pupils with the opportunity to experiment. Is often used to introduce pupils to a science laboratory.
sjacosa
AQA Chemistry GCSE 9-1 Revision Mat: USING RESOURCES

AQA Chemistry GCSE 9-1 Revision Mat: USING RESOURCES

Covers AQA 9-1 Chemistry/Science Trilogy specification for Topic 10: Using Resources. Can be used as Revision Mat or Flashcards. Students can tick the box by each question when they are confident with it. **Answers included. ** Higher Tier / Chemistry-only content clearly marked.
starfishrevision
Context Posters on Lab Safety

Context Posters on Lab Safety

This Key Stage 3 resource is part of the JACOSA scheme. This story based learning project provides students with a compelling learning experience that is designed to put learning into context. The posters are often used at the beginning of lessons to excite learning. Teachers can plan lessons around the story. In this story Logan Woodhouse’ sister has been badly burned in a science experiement and he is determined to find out how it happened. After breaking into a lab he starts to investigate what happened to her. This resource is intended to be used when students are introduced to a lab for the first time. It covers: lab and Bunsen burner safety, drawing science diagrams and following instructions.
sjacosa
Patterns in the Halogens

Patterns in the Halogens

This is a worksheet based on the video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7b2aBKa6-U which is freely available on YouTube. I do not own the copyright to this video but I am not selling it nor am I selling the resource based on it. I just want to share, what I hope, is a useful resource for teachers. Students watch the video and complete the worksheet. Lower ability groups may require the video to be played through twice. I use it as an introduction for higher ability groups or a longer activity for lower ability sets. This covers the content for The Halogens (Group 7) at either KS 3 or KS 4 and is useful given that the Halogens are difficult to show in real life given their toxicity.
old_stanners
Periodic Table Dominoes

Periodic Table Dominoes

An A4 sheet with 21 Dominoes. I use this activity as an introduction to the periodic table for groups of all abilities. It differentiates itself mostly by time. A Low ability group will take a full lesson. A High ability group will take about 15 to 20 minutes. Students cut out each of the dominoes and match them up. Elements are mostly matched using data from the periodic table such as Atomic Number, Mass Number, Symbol, etc. Students will need a copy of the periodic table. Starting with the first one (top left) the dominoes will form a rectangle around the edge of a piece of A3 paper if done correctly. This can then be turned into a poster as an extension activity.
old_stanners
Getting-to-know-you activity for Science

Getting-to-know-you activity for Science

This is a relatively short activity that can be used during the first lesson to help you learn more about your students. The students fill in the information, cut out the beaker and either hand this to their teacher or glue it into their books. It can also be used as an ice breaker game where the students fill in everything apart from their name. The beakers are then swapped around in class and students try to match up their beaker to the correct person. I have included a word document version, so you can edit the writing prompts.
LCass
NEW!! 100% AQA GCSE (9-1) Chemistry & Physics | 4.1.1.3 The Development of the Model of the Atom

NEW!! 100% AQA GCSE (9-1) Chemistry & Physics | 4.1.1.3 The Development of the Model of the Atom

An absoloutlely 100% AQA GCSE (9-1) Resource. Covering Secrets & Key words for AQA Examiners are looking for. Featuring Absoloutly New AQA Exam Questions for the Latest & New GCSE Specifications. Comparing Models with the Plum Pudding Model & The Nuclear Model. Includes Assessment Objective 3 (AO3) with Working Scientifically as REQUIRED by AQA, and how to tackle Diagrams and Understand the Content Required by AQA. Also the Exam Questions indicate as to what Grade and Level of Demand the Qestion targets. By Specifically Stating Standard/High. Where a Standard is approximately Grades 5-6 and High being Grades 7-9 Exactly what AQA Requires you to earn for the Exam. No Extrac Content included. ONLY what you MUST LEARN. So you dont go off a Tangent Please NOTE any Material Modified/Edited will be ragarded as Copyright Infringement. To Produce OR Distribute Copies for Educational Puroporses, please Contact me or Email myself first, BEFORE USE Suitable for ALL Exam Boards, but Targeted at Students/Teachers covering the AQA GCSE (9-1) Specification
aqagcsescience
OCR A Level Chemistry A  Chapter 24.4 Precipitation and ligand substitution -Student workbook + PP

OCR A Level Chemistry A Chapter 24.4 Precipitation and ligand substitution -Student workbook + PP

Student workbook and teacher PP for OCR A Level Chemistry A Year 2 Unit 24 Transition elements, Chapter 24.4 Precipitation and ligand substitution in complex ions, which could be used over two lessons. The workbook contains lesson objectives, different type of tasks (including challenge tasks and stretch and challenge material) and assessment tasks (self-assessed and exam questions). The PP for teachers supports the workbook and contains the answers to Tasks in Workbooks. The resources were prepared with the use of A Level Chemistry for OCR A text book. Many images /diagrams that appear in student workbook and on PP were taken from this book. Some instructions in the workbook and the Summary questions (in assessment part of the booklet) refer to the above book.
kamienie
Y7 Earth (& space) - Revision activities 2018 - Based on AQA KS3 Science Programme of Study

Y7 Earth (& space) - Revision activities 2018 - Based on AQA KS3 Science Programme of Study

Set of four linked resources (all based on the AQA KS3 Science specification) for an engaging revision lesson including: • Loop game activity – Distribute card to the class. One person reads the questions on their card, the pair with the answer read the answer followed by their question and so on until you get back to the starting pair for the final answer (16 cards in the pack). Class can be timed for improvement between start and end of lesson. Sets could be laminated for individual use or could be used as a cut and stick activity. • Broadsheet revision activity – Fill in boxes answering key questions on the topic (mostly similar to questions from loop game) • Crossword – Based on the key terms introduced in previous activities (answers provided) • Wordsearch – Based on the key terms introduced in previous activities (answers provided)
rbusby123
Y7 Reactions - Revision activities 2018 - Based on AQA KS3 Science Programme of Study

Y7 Reactions - Revision activities 2018 - Based on AQA KS3 Science Programme of Study

Set of four linked resources (all based on the AQA KS3 Science specification) for an engaging revision lesson including: • Loop game activity – Distribute card to the class. One person reads the questions on their card, the pair with the answer read the answer followed by their question and so on until you get back to the starting pair for the final answer (16 cards in the pack). Class can be timed for improvement between start and end of lesson. Sets could be laminated for individual use or could be used as a cut and stick activity. • Broadsheet revision activity – Fill in boxes answering key questions on the topic (mostly similar to questions from loop game) • Crossword – Based on the key terms introduced in previous activities (answers provided) • Wordsearch – Based on the key terms introduced in previous activities (answers provided)
rbusby123
Y7 Matter Revision activities 2018 - Based on AQA KS3 Science Programme of Study

Y7 Matter Revision activities 2018 - Based on AQA KS3 Science Programme of Study

Set of four linked resources (all based on the AQA KS3 Science specification) for an engaging revision lesson including: • Loop game activity – Distribute card to the class. One person reads the questions on their card, the pair with the answer read the answer followed by their question and so on until you get back to the starting pair for the final answer (16 cards in the pack). Class can be timed for improvement between start and end of lesson. Sets could be laminated for individual use or could be used as a cut and stick activity. • Broadsheet revision activity – Fill in boxes answering key questions on the topic (mostly similar to questions from loop game) • Crossword – Based on the key terms introduced in previous activities (answers provided) • Wordsearch – Based on the key terms introduced in previous activities (answers provided)
rbusby123
Stand-alone lesson on Scientific Discoveries

Stand-alone lesson on Scientific Discoveries

This is a stand-alone lesson on recent scientific discoveries and research. The lesson is mostly student-led and requires IT access. The task can be adjusted and adapted to fit your needs. I have used this lesson a number of times as a filler lesson or as a cover lesson task for planned absences. For the latter, I introduced the task at the end of the lesson prior to my absence, and then gave students another session after the cover lesson to present their findings. My students have enjoyed the more open inquiry nature of this task. I have included : The power-point presentation setting the task A worksheet that scaffolds the students’ research (word document and pdf) and contains qr codes and links to websites that will act as a starting point for their research. Enjoy :)
LCass