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**Create Lessons and Interactive Games - based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** **Based on AQA biology specification**

**Create Lessons and Interactive Games - based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** **Based on AQA biology specification**
KS3 - Heat and Temperature
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KS3 - Heat and Temperature

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Learning Objective: Know the difference between temperature and heat State what thermal energy pf an object depends on Compare temperature and heat Explain in terms of energy, why objects change temperature
4.5.2.1 Structure and function-  Reflex Actions -  AQA - Home learning
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4.5.2.1 Structure and function- Reflex Actions - AQA - Home learning

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification Students should be able to explain how the various structures in a reflex arc – including the sensory neurone, synapse, relay neurone and motor neurone – relate to their function. Students should understand why reflex actions are important. Reflex actions are automatic and rapid; they do not involve the conscious part of the brain.
10.2 The structure and function of the human nervous system -  Home Learning
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10.2 The structure and function of the human nervous system - Home Learning

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification 4.5.2.1 Structure and function Students should be able to explain how the structure of the nervous system is adapted to its functions. The nervous system enables humans to react to their surroundings and to coordinate their behaviour. Information from receptors passes along cells (neurones) as electrical impulses to the central nervous system (CNS). The CNS is the brain and spinal cord. The CNS coordinates the response of effectors which may be muscles contracting or glands secreting hormones. stimulus receptor coordinator effector response
4.5.3.2 Control of blood glucose concentration-  AQA
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4.5.3.2 Control of blood glucose concentration- AQA

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification Blood glucose concentration is monitored and controlled by the pancreas. If the blood glucose concentration is too high, the pancreas produces the hormone insulin that causes glucose to move from the blood into the cells. In liver and muscle cells excess glucose is converted to glycogen for storage. Students should be able to explain how insulin controls blood glucose (sugar) levels in the body. Type 1 diabetes is a disorder in which the pancreas fails to produce sufficient insulin. It is characterised by uncontrolled high blood glucose levels and is normally treated with insulin injections. In Type 2 diabetes the body cells no longer respond to insulin produced by the pancreas. A carbohydrate controlled diet and an exercise regime are common treatments. Obesity is a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes. Students should be able to compare Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes and explain how they can be treated. (HT only) If the blood glucose concentration is too low, the pancreas produces the hormone glucagon that causes glycogen to be converted into glucose and released into the blood. (HT only) Students should be able to explain how glucagon interacts with insulin in a negative feedback cycle to control blood glucose (sugar) levels in the body
Response to exercise
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Response to exercise

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification: During exercise the human body reacts to the increased demand for energy. The heart rate, breathing rate and breath volume increase during exercise to supply the muscles with more oxygenated blood. If insufficient oxygen is supplied anaerobic respiration takes place in muscles. The incomplete oxidation of glucose causes a build up of lactic acid and creates an oxygen debt. During long periods of vigorous activity muscles become fatigued and stop contracting efficiently. (HT only) Blood flowing through the muscles transports the lactic acid to the liver where it is converted back into glucose. Oxygen debt is the amount of extra oxygen the body needs after exercise to react with the accumulated lactic acid and remove it from the cells.
4.5.3.1 Human endocrine system -  AQA - Home learning
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4.5.3.1 Human endocrine system - AQA - Home learning

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification Students should be able to describe the principles of hormonal coordination and control by the human endocrine system. The endocrine system is composed of glands which secrete chemicals called hormones directly into the bloodstream. The blood carries the hormone to a target organ where it produces an effect. Compared to the nervous system the effects are slower but act for longer. The pituitary gland in the brain is a ‘master gland’ which secretes several hormones into the blood in response to body conditions. These hormones in turn act on other glands to stimulate other hormones to be released to bring about effects. Students should be able to identify the position of the following on a diagram of the human body: • pituitary gland • pancreas • thyroid • adrenal gland • ovary • testes.
Tissue and Organs in Plants (including Home Learning)
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Tissue and Organs in Plants (including Home Learning)

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification Students should be able to explain how the structures of plant tissues are related to their functions. Plant tissues include: • epidermal tissues • palisade mesophyll • spongy mesophyll • xylem and phloem • meristem tissue found at the growing tips of shoots and roots. The leaf is a plant organ. Knowledge limited to epidermis, palisade and spongy mesophyll, xylem and phloem, and guard cells surrounding stomata.
Aerobic Respiration
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Aerobic Respiration

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification Students should be able to describe cellular respiration as an exothermic reaction which is continuously occurring in living cells. The energy transferred supplies all the energy needed for living processes. Respiration in cells can take place aerobically (using oxygen) or anaerobically (without oxygen), to transfer energy. Organisms need energy for: • chemical reactions to build larger molecules • movement • keeping warm. Aerobic respiration is represented by the equation: glucose + oxygen carbon dioxide + water Students should recognise the chemical symbols: C6 H12O6 , O2 , CO2 and H2O.
KS3 - Cells
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KS3 - Cells

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Learning Objective: Know what an organism is State the name of the organelles found in a plant and animal cell Describe the role for the organelles found in a plant and animal cell
4.6.1.1 Sexual and asexual reproduction - ( Home Learning also)
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4.6.1.1 Sexual and asexual reproduction - ( Home Learning also)

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification Students should understand that meiosis leads to non-identical cells being formed while mitosis leads to identical cells being formed. Sexual reproduction involves the joining (fusion) of male and female gametes: • sperm and egg cells in animals • pollen and egg cells in flowering plants. In sexual reproduction there is mixing of genetic information which leads to variety in the offspring. The formation of gametes involves meiosis. Asexual reproduction involves only one parent and no fusion of gametes. There is no mixing of genetic information. This leads to genetically identical offspring (clones). Only mitosis is involved.
4.5.1 Homeostasis -  AQA - Home learning
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4.5.1 Homeostasis - AQA - Home learning

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification Students should be able to explain that homeostasis is the regulation of the internal conditions of a cell or organism to maintain optimum conditions for function in response to internal and external changes. Homeostasis maintains optimal conditions for enzyme action and all cell functions. In the human body, these include control of: • blood glucose concentration • body temperature • water levels. These automatic control systems may involve nervous responses or chemical responses. All control systems include: • cells called receptors, which detect stimuli (changes in the environment) • coordination centres (such as the brain, spinal cord and pancreas) that receive and process information from receptors • effectors, muscles or glands, which bring about responses which restore optimum levels.
Ecology - Importance of Communities - AQA ( including Home Learning)
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Ecology - Importance of Communities - AQA ( including Home Learning)

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**Based on AQA biology specification ( can be used for revision). Includes: Content, AFL Questions, Exam style Questions and Answers ** Based on AQA biology specification Students should be able to describe: • different levels of organisation in an ecosystem from individual organisms to the whole ecosystem • the importance of interdependence and competition in a community. Students should be able to, when provided with appropriate information: • suggest the factors for which organisms are competing in a given habitat • suggest how organisms are adapted to the conditions in which they live. An ecosystem is the interaction of a community of living organisms (biotic) with the non-living (abiotic) parts of their environment. To survive and reproduce, organisms require a supply of materials from their surroundings and from the other living organisms there. Plants in a community or habitat often compete with each other for light and space, and for water and mineral ions from the soil. Animals often compete with each other for food, mates and territory. Within a community each species depends on other species for food, shelter, pollination, seed dispersal etc. If one species is removed it can affect the whole community. This is called interdependence. A stable community is one where all the species and environmental factors are in balance so that population sizes remain fairly constant.
KS3 - Unicellular Organism
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KS3 - Unicellular Organism

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AQA - Explain how uni-cellular organisms are adapted to carry out functions that in multi-cellular organisms are done by different types of cell. Learning Objective: Define unicellular organism Identify structures in an amoeba and euglena Explain how unicellular organisms are adapted to carry out different functions
KS3 - Specialised Cells
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KS3 - Specialised Cells

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Learning Objective: Name some examples of specialised plant and animal cells Describe examples of specialised plant and animal cells Suggest the type of organism or tissue a cell comes from, based on its features