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Support the development of high school close reading skills and textual analysis of Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird (chapter 15). A variety of high-order question types facilitates the process of analyzing character motivations, examining how word choices influence a reader’s interpretations, applying knowledge of literary devices, and articulating ideas in writing with clarity and precision. To accommodate classroom and distance learning settings, this resource will be delivered as a Word Document and a PDF.

This resource aligns well to Academic Literacy Project teaching principles and may serve as the basis for small-group discussions. Through these discussions, students decode language and pose/respond to questions relating to plot, broad topics, and character development, demonstrating an ability to analyze how complex characters transform and advance the plot and themes by applying logic and citing compelling, meaningful textual evidence. They will also evaluate their peers’ reasoning and use of rhetoric to advance claims, clarifying or challenging unclear ideas. Using this resource for structured guidance, students, ultimately, will present information, conclusions, and supporting textual evidence clearly, concisely, and appropriately, thereby helping their peers comprehend their thinking.

More specifically, students will be able to:

  • Articulate what the text states explicitly and implicitly
  • Explain the significance of a given detail
  • Write with clarity, logic, and precision
  • Cite relevant textual evidence in support of claims
  • Identify the factors that contributed to the “placid week” preceding the mob incident
  • Analyze what the fact that “Jem would struggle…through the speeches of Henry W. Grady” suggests about his character development
  • Analyze how complex characters interact
  • Explore the shift in tone once Scout approaches Mr. Cunningham
  • Demonstrate understanding of the literary device paradox
  • Analyze Mr. Underwood’s values set
  • Articulate a significant misunderstanding Atticus has about his own community
  • Explore how Atticus demonstrates courage
  • Identify and explain an example of dramatic irony
  • Copyright restrictions prohibit the inclusion of the complete chapter, so the purchaser is responsible for providing students with access to the novel.

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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheets Bundle (Chapters 1-15)

Support the development of high school close reading skills and analytical thinking with this bundle of *To Kill a Mockingbird* resources covering the first 15 chapters of the novel. Featuring more than 125 high-order thinking questions, this bundle offers Word Doc and PDF versions of each individual resource. This resource may serve as the basis for small-group discussions. Through these discussions, students decode language and pose/respond to questions relating to plot, broad topics, and character development, demonstrating an ability to analyze how complex characters transform and advance the plot and themes by applying logic and citing compelling, meaningful textual evidence. They will also evaluate their peers' reasoning and use of rhetoric to advance claims, clarifying or challenging unclear ideas. Using this resource for structured guidance, students, ultimately, will present information, conclusions, and supporting textual evidence clearly, concisely, and appropriately, thereby helping their peers comprehend their thinking. Make reading more purposeful with these close reading activities to support students in their efforts to demonstrate proficiency in the following areas: * An ability to define complex vocabulary in context * An ability to analyze context clues and draw logical inferences about character motivations * An ability to analyze context clues and draw logical inferences about character relationships * An ability to analyze the text for literary devices such as foreshadowing, situational irony, dramatic irony, theme, symbolism, dynamic character, and more * An ability to find and articulate relevant textual details in support of a claim * An ability to analyze context clues to discern and articulate the significance of a given detail * An ability to articulate what the text indicates both explicitly and implicitly * An ability to write with clarity and precision

$32.00

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