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I am entering my fifth year in education as of the 2015-16 school year. I primarily teach Freshman English courses, though I have taught numerous electives in a high school setting. My goal is to share resources with other educators in an effort to facilitate their professional experiences, particularly for those new to the profession or the field of English.

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I am entering my fifth year in education as of the 2015-16 school year. I primarily teach Freshman English courses, though I have taught numerous electives in a high school setting. My goal is to share resources with other educators in an effort to facilitate their professional experiences, particularly for those new to the profession or the field of English.
Othello Quiz Bundle

Othello Quiz Bundle

There is one quiz for each Act of Othello for a total of 5 quizzes. Two quizzes are short answer in nature, compared to three in multiple choice format. All are Word documents for ease of future revisions. In addition to the quizzes, this zip file also contains answer keys for each quiz. Act 1 This is a 12-question comprehension assessment in short answer format. The answer key is included. • Roderigo's affections for Desdemona • Iago's fury toward Othello • Brabantio • The Turks' plan to attack Cyprus • Othello and Desdemona's relationship • Desdemona's internal conflict • Othello's departure • Desdemona's arrangement to stay with Iago • Brabantio's warning to Othello • Iago's manipulation of Roderigo Act 2 This is a 10-question reading comprehension assessment in short answer format. The answer key is included. ♦ The end of the war with the Turks ♦ Iago's emphasis on Cassio's friendliness toward Desdemona ♦ Cassio's weakness ♦ Iago's taking advantage of Cassio's weakness ♦ The consequences of Cassio's actions ♦ Othello's ironic perspective on Iago's character ♦ Cassio seeking advice from one he considers his closest friend ♦ Iago's next manipulative move involving Desdemona Act 3 This is a 13-question reading comprehension assessment in multiple choice format. The answer key is included. ♦ Cassio's verbal exchange with Desdemona ♦ Iago encouraging Othello's suspicions toward Desdemona ♦ Desdemona's requests for Othello to forgive Cassio ♦ Othello's insistence that Iago tell him everything he knows ♦ Iago's underhanded behaviors and statements ♦ Othello's statements on marital trust and jealousy ♦ The retrieval of Desdemona's handkerchief ♦ Othello's mounting suspicions ♦ Othello's ultimatum to Iago ♦ Desdemona's frustrations Act 4 This is an 11-question reading comprehension assessment. An answer key is provided. ♦ Othello's rage-fueled trance ♦ Iago's conspiracy to make Othello think Cassio loves Desdemona ♦ Iago's barbarous suggestion regarding Desdemona's fate ♦ The letter from Venice ♦ Lodovico's witnessing Othello's abusive behavior ♦ Emilia's verbal exchange with Othello ♦ Othello's confrontation with Desdemona ♦ Desdemona turning to Iago for help ♦ Roderigo's frustration with Iago ♦ The arrangement Iago makes for Roderigo ♦ Desdemona's foreshadowing fear Act 5 This is a 13-question reading comprehension assessment in short answer format. The answer key is included. ♦ Iago's concern that Roderigo could expose him ♦ Iago's irrational jealousy of Cassio ♦ Cassio's injury ♦ Fatal wounds ♦ And more
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To Kill a Mockingbird Test & Key

To Kill a Mockingbird Test & Key

Part 1. Historical Context. Multiple Choice. Answer questions pertaining to relevant aspects of American history. • Segregation • Desegregation • Emancipation Proclamation • Harper Lee's birth Part 2. True/False. Respond to questions pertaining primarily to plot. Details covered include (but aren't limited to) the following: • Prejudice and Nazi Germany • Duration of jury deliberations • The length of time Jem reads to Mrs. Dubose • Scout's understanding of Bob's death • The scene of Bob's death • The general hypocrisy of the community • Bob Ewell's testimony • Application of literary terminology, including antagonist and irony • The impact of the Great Depression • Autobiographical parallel • Mayella's motivations • The pageant Part 3. Character Identification. Multiple Choice. Match the character's name to the associated detail. Questions pertain to (but aren't limited to) the following: • The Tim Johnson incident • The scene of Bob Ewell's death • A blanket wrapped around Scout • Dill's summer caretaker • A character living two lives • A stubborn and traditionally Southern visitor • One who helps to protect Helen Robinson • A character who is upset at Scout's ability to read and write • The harsh editorial • One who points out the hypocrisy of others • One who understands the trial but not the larger issue of racism • One who experiences abuse at home • The kindness and generosity of a neighbor • And more Part 4. Quotes. Matching. Crucial quotes from the novel are given. It is the student's job to match the quote to the appropriate context. Part 5. Fill-in-the-Blank. Given a quote, the student will identify the speaker, recipient, and context. Part 6. Short Answer. Respond to questions that require one to apply knowledge of literary devices to the novel. • Dynamic character • Setting • Autobiographical parallel • Theme Seventy-nine questions total. A key is included.
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The Hobbit Test & Key

The Hobbit Test & Key

This is an 87-question assessment for Tolkien's The Hobbit. The corresponding answer key is included. Part 1. Character Identification. Multiple choice. ♦ Bilbo ♦ Thorin ♦ Gandalf ♦ Elrond ♦ Beorn ♦ Bard ♦ Smaug ♦ Roac ♦ The dwarves ♦ Gollum ♦ The Great Goblin ♦ Lord of the Eagles ♦ The trolls ♦ The Elvenking ♦ The woof-elves ♦ The thrush ♦ Wargs Part 2. Places and Concepts. Multiple choice. ♦ The Arkenstone ♦ Durin's Day ♦ Description of a typical Baggins ♦ What it means to be "Tookish" ♦ The dwarves' response to Bilbo's participation ♦ Bilbo's emotional response following the unexpected party ♦ The conflict involving the trolls ♦ Beorn's concerns ♦ Bilbo's sword ♦ The Orcrist ♦ The Last Homely House ♦ The enchanted stream ♦ Thorin and the Elvenking's stubbornness ♦ Bilbo's rescue of the adventurers ♦ Bilbo's escape plan flaw ♦ Lake-town's reaction to the presence of the adventurers ♦ The mountain's secret door ♦ A dragon's traits Part 3. Vocabulary. Matching. 12 questions. ♦ Audacious ♦ Smote ♦ Obstinately ♦ Flummoxed ♦ Venerable ♦ Plight ♦ Forbear ♦ Toothsome ♦ Haste ♦ Mirth ♦ Parley ♦ Eyrie Part 4. Quote Association. Matching. Identify the speaker. 12 quotes. ♦ “If I say he is a Burglar, a Burglar he is, or will be when the time comes.” ♦ “Moon letters are rune letters, but you cannot see them.” ♦ “He’s found it, yes he must have. My birthday present.” ♦ “Well, it is the first time that even a mouse has crept along carefully and quietly under my very nose and not been spotted.” ♦ “…the bacon knows that it will get back in the pan sooner or later, and it is to be hoped we shan’t.” ♦ “The day will come when they will perish and I will go back!” ♦ “I’m going to lie here and sleep and dream of food, if I can’t get it any other way.” ♦ “No treasure will come back through Mirkwood without my having something to say in the matter.” ♦ And more Part 5. Quote Analysis. Identify the speaker, recipient(s) of the statement, and the context. 3 quotes. ♦ “May the wind under your wings bear you where the sun sails and the moon walks.” ♦ “Come along back to your nice cells, and I will lock you all in again, and you can sit there comfortably and think of a better plan.” ♦ “Since I leave now all gold and silver, and go where it is of little worth, I wish to part in friendship from you…” Part 6. Essays. Respond to 2 prompts. ♦ Dynamic character ♦ Heroism ♦ Theme
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 16; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 16; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the sixteenth chapter of *To Kill a Mockingbird *by Harper Lee. Featuring 10 multiple choice questions, this editable resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Drawing inferences: "The full meaning of the night’s events hit me and I began crying. Jem was awfully nice about it: for once he didn’t remind me that people nearly nine years old didn’t do things like that." ♦ Applying literary terminology (metaphor): "Atticus watched in frank admiration; Aunt Alexandra sipped coffee and radiated waves of disapproval." ♦ Reading closely: "Children who slipped out at night were a disgrace to the family." ♦ Inferring meaning: "You know how they talk among themselves. Everything that happens in this town’s out to the Quarters before sundown." ♦ Paraphrasing Atticus’s feelings toward Mr. Cunningham after the mob incident. ♦ Understanding literary terminology (hyperbole): "‘It’s all over town this morning,’ [Dill] announced, 'all about how we held off a hundred folks with our bare hands…" ♦ Defining vocabulary in context: formidable. ♦ Reading closely: Why Maudie chooses not to attend the trial. ♦ Identifying accurate statements: Dolphus Raymond’s banishment from traditional society and condemnation to an uneasy life among a minority class. ♦ Discerning the significance of the children’s placement in the balcony among the African American community. This resource aligns well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 17; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 17; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the seventeenth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 6 multiple choice questions and 1 constructed response question, this editable resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Discerning meaning: “Every town the size of Maycomb had families like the Ewells. No economic fluctuations changed their status—people like the Ewells lived as guests of the county in prosperity as well as in the depths of a depression.” ♦ Discerning meaning: “The varmints had a lean time of it, for the Ewells gave the dump a thorough gleaning every day…” ♦ Understanding characters’ feelings (Jem and Scout): “We acquired no traumas from watching our father win or lose…” ♦ Understanding Bob Ewell’s testimony: "I’ve asked this county for fifteen years to clean out that nest down yonder, they’re dangerous to live around ‘sides devaluin’ my property—”; “Mr. Ewell was endearing himself to his fellow citizens.” ♦ Interpreting metaphorical expressions: Bob is described by the narrator as “a red little rooster.” ♦ Interpreting metaphorical expressions: “It seemed to me that [Atticus had] gone frog-sticking without a light.” ♦ Applying literary devices and articulating rationale: verbal irony. This resource aligns well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 21; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 21; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the twenty-first chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 7 multiple choice questions, this editable resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Analyzing character: assessing Atticus’s feelings about his children’s attendance. ♦ Inferring meaning in a quote: Jem’s lack of awareness of institutionalized racism. ♦ Defining vocabulary in context: relenting. ♦ Analyzing character: Atticus’s belief that Tom will be found guilty despite the evidence. ♦ Determining character intent: Reverend Sykes wants to temper Jem’s expectations and prepare him for harsh realities. ♦ Locating textual support: “When [the clock] bonged eleven times I was past feeling: tired from fighting sleep, I allowed myself a short nap against Reverend Sykes’s comfortable arm and shoulder.” ♦ Determining character intent: Reverend Sykes wants Scout to demonstrate respect for Atticus’s efforts. This resource aligns well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource may prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 10; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 10; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the tenth chapter of *To Kill a Mockingbird *by Harper Lee. Featuring 8 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Analyzing character: Assessing Scout’s feelings toward her father. ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: Rudiments. ♦ Paraphrasing Maudie’s explanation why "it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird." ♦ Deriving meaning: What Scout means when she refers to a "generous target." ♦ Understanding character motivation: Why Scout wished her "father was a devil from hell." ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: Erratically. ♦ Making logical inferences. ♦ Paraphrasing Maudie’s explanation for why Atticus does not like guns. This resource aligns well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
High School Grammar Packet: Writing Numerals and Using Active Voice

High School Grammar Packet: Writing Numerals and Using Active Voice

This grammar packet covers 16 rules for writing numerals according to standard conventions. It also helps students practice using active voice (and word economy) by revising sentences written in passive voice. This resource is recommended for high school students enrolled in composition classes emphasizing foundational writing skills.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheets Bundle (Set of 15)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheets Bundle (Set of 15)

This bundle of 15 close reading exercises, which features more than 125 higher order thinking questions, encourages purposeful reading and deeper comprehension of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. These resources align well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to comprehend challenging texts, close reading resources may help students prepare for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 1; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 1; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the first chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 9 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Simon Finch’s history and how he "regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North and the South" ♦ Atticus Finch’s history and how he broke "the tradition of living on the land" ♦ Atticus Finch’s first two clients and their ignorance ♦ The Haverfords’ having "dispatching Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare" ♦ The narrator’s intent when describing Calpurnia’s hand as "wide as a bed slat and twice as hard" ♦ An interpretation of the following phrase: "inhabited by an unknown entity the mere description of whom was enough to make us behave for days on end" ♦ Defining and interpreting vocabulary and phrasing in context (‘predilection’ and ‘a neighborhood scold’) ♦ Atticus’s use of metaphor to communicate how there are several ways to break a person down to the point of isolation from the outside world In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 2; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 2; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the second chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 8 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Drawing logical inferences (supporting the notion that Miss Caroline is out of touch with the lives of her students) ♦ The significance of Miss Caroline’s being from Winston County, Alabama ♦ What motivates Miss Caroline to insist that Atticus not teach Scout how to read ♦ Drawing logical inferences (supporting the notion that Walter Cunningham is embarrassed to be the center of attention) ♦ Defining vocabulary in context (dreary) ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expression (tail in a crack) ♦ Character’s intent (Atticus’s sincere belief that the Cunningham family will eventually repay him for his services) In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 4; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 4; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the fourth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 13 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Inferring meaning: “[A]s I inched sluggishly along the treadmill of the Maycomb County school system, I could not help receiving the impression that I was being cheated out of something." ♦ Vocabulary in context: Tyranny. ♦ Discerning the significance of a passage: "Rather than risk a tangle with Calpurnia, I did as Jem told me. For some reason, my first year of school had wrought a great change in our relationship. Calpurnia’s tyranny, unfairness, and meddling in my business had faded to gentle grumblings of general disapproval. On my part, I went to much trouble, sometimes, not to provoke her." ♦ Applying the concept of irony to a passage: “It was the kind of box wedding rings came in, purple velvet with a minute catch. Jem flicked open the tiny catch. Inside were two scrubbed and polished pennies, one on top of the other.” ♦ Interpreting meaning: “Finders were keepers unless title was proven.” ♦ Interpreting meaning: “I did not realize that Jem was offended by my contradicting him on Hot Steams, and that he was patiently awaiting an opportunity to reward me.” ♦ Drawing inferences: "Jem looked at me furiously, could not decline, ran down the sidewalk, treaded water at the gate, then dashed in and retrieved the tire." ♦ Interpreting metaphor: "Jem’s head at times was transparent." ♦ Literary devices: Allusion. ♦ Drawing inferences: "we did not see Atticus standing on the sidewalk looking at us, slapping a rolled magazine against his knee." ♦ Literary devices: Personification. ♦ Vocabulary in context: Evasion. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 5; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 5; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the fifth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 9 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key with rationale for each answer and covers the following: ♦ Inferring meaning and significance: “[Miss Maudie] called us by all our names, and when she grinned she revealed two minute gold prongs clipped to her eyeteeth. When I admired them and hoped I would have some eventually, she said ‘Look here.’ With a click of her tongue she thrust out her bridgework, a gesture of cordiality that cemented our friendship.” ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expressions: “was admitted to our confidence." ♦ Interpreting meaning: “Did you know some of ‘em came out of the woods one Saturday and passed by this place and told me me and my flowers were going to hell?” ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expressions: “had an acid tongue in her head.” ♦ Interpreting meaning: “There are just some kind of men who—who’re so busy worrying about the next world they’ve never learned to live in this one, and you can look down the street and see the results.” ♦ Supporting a claim regarding the origin of Maudie’s interest in gardening using textual evidence: “Her father was a neighboring landowner. His name was Dr. Frank Buford. He was a medicine man, but he stayed poor because he was obsessed with his plants and the earth.” ♦ Applying literary terminology: hyperbole. ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: inquisitive. ♦ Inferring a character’s intent: Atticus. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 6; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 6; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the sixth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 11 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Deriving meaning: “Making change in the collection plate every Sunday.” ♦ Applying literary devices: Dialect. ♦ Deriving meaning: "A closer inspection revealed an arc of water descending from the leaves and splashing in the yellow circle of the street light, some ten feet from source to earth, it seemed to us." ♦ Defining vocabulary in context: Prowess. ♦ Understanding what Scout means when she describes herself as "untalented in this area." ♦ Applying literary terminology: Dramatic irony. ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expressions: "Hatching one." ♦ Interpreting meaning: “Matches were dangerous, but cards were fatal.” ♦ Deriving meaning: “It was then, I suppose, that Jem and I first began to part company.” ♦ Applying literary devices: Simile. ♦ Drawing logical inferences: “[Jem] lay down, and for a while I heard his cot trembling.” In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 8; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 8; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the eighth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 8 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Accurately paraphrasing Atticus’s remarks: “Son, I can’t tell what you’re going to be—an engineer, a lawyer, or a portrait painter. You’ve perpetrated a near libel here in the front yard.” ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: Touchous. ♦ Drawing logical inferences: “The old fire truck, killed by the cold, was being pushed from town by a crowd of men. When the men attached its hose to a hydrant, the hose burst and water shot up, tinkling down on the pavement.” ♦ Applying literary devices: Simile. ♦ Demonstrating comprehension of plot: "An absolute morphodite." ♦ Inferring meaning: “Do not let this inspire you to further glory” (Atticus to Jem). ♦ Demonstrating comprehension of plot: Why Scout’s “stomach turned to water.” ♦ Applying literary devices: Situational irony. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 7; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 7; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the seventh chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 7 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Paraphrasing Atticus’s advice for Scout about Jem. ♦ Deriving meaning: “Can’t anybody tell what I’m gonna do lest they know me, can they, Scout?” ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: grim. ♦ Applying literary devices: foreshadowing. ♦ Applying literary devices: slang. ♦ Applying literary devices: situational irony. ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expressions: “bad humor.” In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 9; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 9; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the ninth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 11 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Deriving meaning: “The sooner I learned to hold in, the better off everybody would be.” ♦ Atticus’s reasoning for encouraging Scout to eliminate derogatory language from her vocabulary. ♦ Understanding Scout’s motivation for feigning illness. ♦ Paraphrasing Atticus’s remarks: “Simply because we were licked a hundred years before we started is no reason for us not to try to win.” ♦ Understanding context: "This time we aren’t fighting the Yankees, we’re fighting our friends." ♦ Understanding metaphor: “Aunt Alexandra would have been analogous to Mount Everest.” ♦ Characterizing Scout’s feelings toward Uncle Jack. ♦ Characterizing Atticus’s feelings toward the kids having and using rifles. ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: Tarried. ♦ Interpreting Atticus’s use of language: “Maycomb’s usual disease.” In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 20)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 20)

This close reading worksheet helps students analyze Atticus's closing remarks in chapter 20 of Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird. It is seven questions in length, and an answer key is included. The following is addressed: ♦ "I have nothing in my heart but pity..." ♦ A "rigid and time-honored code..." ♦ A suggestion of Mayella's motives ♦ The ignorance and arrogance of the Ewells ♦ Evil assumptions ♦ The idea of all men being created equal
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 30; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 30; ACT Prep)

This close reading resource helps students analyze chapter 30 of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. The document features 10 questions and covers the following: ♦ Vocabulary in context ♦ Drawing inferences ♦ Character motivations ♦ Character conflicts ♦ The interactions between Atticus and Heck ♦ And more This resource was designed to promote deeper understanding of the novel and prepare students for ACT-style questioning. An answer key is included.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapters 23 & 26; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapters 23 & 26; ACT Prep)

This close reading resource helps students analyze two brief passages from chapters 23 and 26 of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. The document features seven questions and covers the following: ♦ Vocabulary in context ♦ Analysis of Jem's dynamic character ♦ Drawing inferences about Boo's motivations ♦ Determining internal conflict ♦ The author's intended message in a passage ♦ The motif of hypocrisy ♦ The author's use of language to establish character This resource was designed to promote deeper understanding of the novel and prepare students for ACT-style questioning. An answer key is included.
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The Hobbit Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 1)

The Hobbit Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 1)

This close reading exercise helps students read more actively and analyze the text more deeply to promote improved comprehension of The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien (Chapter 1). Six multiple choice questions are included, and an answer key is provided. This resource, which highlights several textual passages, specifically addresses the following: ♦ The longstanding reputation of a Baggins ♦ Determining the meaning of vocabulary in context ♦ A shift in tone; the dwarves' historical background; and the start of the adventure ♦ Author's intent (analysis of character) ♦ Drawing inferences from character statements and actions
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The Adventures of Ulysses: Close Reading Worksheet (Prologue through "Lotus Eaters")

The Adventures of Ulysses: Close Reading Worksheet (Prologue through "Lotus Eaters")

This close reading exercise helps students read more actively and analyze the text more deeply to promote improved comprehension of The Adventures of Ulysses by Bernard Evslin. This resource features seven questions and covers the prologue through the chapter titled "The Lotus-Eaters." It highlights several textual passages and references the following. ♦ The gods' motivation to have Paris determine which goddess was the fairest ♦ Biographical background on Queen Helen ♦ Vocabulary in context (tactician) ♦ Ulysses' distinct ability to think critically about the consequences of actions, as compared to his crew's inability ♦ Ulysses sense of fair judgment during the battle with the Ciconians ♦ The author's use of language to establish setting (Lotus Land) and mood ♦ Morpheus's observations of Ulysses' dreams and how they foreshadow future occurrences An answer key is included.
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High School Grammar Packet: Using Commas, Conjunctions, and Semicolons

High School Grammar Packet: Using Commas, Conjunctions, and Semicolons

This grammar packet covers 12 essential rules for using commas, semicolons, and conjunctions correctly. Students apply their understanding of these rules by making revisions to several sentences. This resource is recommended for high school students enrolled in composition classes emphasizing foundational writing skills. An answer key is included.
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