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I am entering my fifth year in education as of the 2015-16 school year. I primarily teach Freshman English courses, though I have taught numerous electives in a high school setting. My goal is to share resources with other educators in an effort to facilitate their professional experiences, particularly for those new to the profession or the field of English.

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I am entering my fifth year in education as of the 2015-16 school year. I primarily teach Freshman English courses, though I have taught numerous electives in a high school setting. My goal is to share resources with other educators in an effort to facilitate their professional experiences, particularly for those new to the profession or the field of English.
Othello Quiz Bundle

Othello Quiz Bundle

There is one quiz for each Act of Othello for a total of 5 quizzes. Two quizzes are short answer in nature, compared to three in multiple choice format. All are Word documents for ease of future revisions. In addition to the quizzes, this zip file also contains answer keys for each quiz. Act 1 This is a 12-question comprehension assessment in short answer format. The answer key is included. • Roderigo's affections for Desdemona • Iago's fury toward Othello • Brabantio ��� The Turks' plan to attack Cyprus • Othello and Desdemona's relationship • Desdemona's internal conflict • Othello's departure • Desdemona's arrangement to stay with Iago • Brabantio's warning to Othello • Iago's manipulation of Roderigo Act 2 This is a 10-question reading comprehension assessment in short answer format. The answer key is included. ♦ The end of the war with the Turks ♦ Iago's emphasis on Cassio's friendliness toward Desdemona ♦ Cassio's weakness ♦ Iago's taking advantage of Cassio's weakness ♦ The consequences of Cassio's actions ♦ Othello's ironic perspective on Iago's character ♦ Cassio seeking advice from one he considers his closest friend ♦ Iago's next manipulative move involving Desdemona Act 3 This is a 13-question reading comprehension assessment in multiple choice format. The answer key is included. ♦ Cassio's verbal exchange with Desdemona ♦ Iago encouraging Othello's suspicions toward Desdemona ♦ Desdemona's requests for Othello to forgive Cassio ♦ Othello's insistence that Iago tell him everything he knows ♦ Iago's underhanded behaviors and statements ♦ Othello's statements on marital trust and jealousy ♦ The retrieval of Desdemona's handkerchief ♦ Othello's mounting suspicions ♦ Othello's ultimatum to Iago ♦ Desdemona's frustrations Act 4 This is an 11-question reading comprehension assessment. An answer key is provided. ♦ Othello's rage-fueled trance ♦ Iago's conspiracy to make Othello think Cassio loves Desdemona ♦ Iago's barbarous suggestion regarding Desdemona's fate ♦ The letter from Venice ♦ Lodovico's witnessing Othello's abusive behavior ♦ Emilia's verbal exchange with Othello ♦ Othello's confrontation with Desdemona ♦ Desdemona turning to Iago for help ♦ Roderigo's frustration with Iago ♦ The arrangement Iago makes for Roderigo ♦ Desdemona's foreshadowing fear Act 5 This is a 13-question reading comprehension assessment in short answer format. The answer key is included. ♦ Iago's concern that Roderigo could expose him ♦ Iago's irrational jealousy of Cassio ♦ Cassio's injury ♦ Fatal wounds ♦ And more
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To Kill a Mockingbird Test & Key

To Kill a Mockingbird Test & Key

Part 1. Historical Context. Multiple Choice. Answer questions pertaining to relevant aspects of American history. • Segregation • Desegregation • Emancipation Proclamation • Harper Lee's birth Part 2. True/False. Respond to questions pertaining primarily to plot. Details covered include (but aren't limited to) the following: • Prejudice and Nazi Germany • Duration of jury deliberations • The length of time Jem reads to Mrs. Dubose • Scout's understanding of Bob's death • The scene of Bob's death • The general hypocrisy of the community • Bob Ewell's testimony • Application of literary terminology, including antagonist and irony • The impact of the Great Depression • Autobiographical parallel • Mayella's motivations • The pageant Part 3. Character Identification. Multiple Choice. Match the character's name to the associated detail. Questions pertain to (but aren't limited to) the following: • The Tim Johnson incident • The scene of Bob Ewell's death • A blanket wrapped around Scout • Dill's summer caretaker • A character living two lives • A stubborn and traditionally Southern visitor • One who helps to protect Helen Robinson • A character who is upset at Scout's ability to read and write • The harsh editorial • One who points out the hypocrisy of others • One who understands the trial but not the larger issue of racism • One who experiences abuse at home • The kindness and generosity of a neighbor • And more Part 4. Quotes. Matching. Crucial quotes from the novel are given. It is the student's job to match the quote to the appropriate context. Part 5. Fill-in-the-Blank. Given a quote, the student will identify the speaker, recipient, and context. Part 6. Short Answer. Respond to questions that require one to apply knowledge of literary devices to the novel. • Dynamic character • Setting • Autobiographical parallel • Theme Seventy-nine questions total. A key is included.
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The Hobbit Test & Key

The Hobbit Test & Key

This is an 87-question assessment for Tolkien's The Hobbit. The corresponding answer key is included. Part 1. Character Identification. Multiple choice. ♦ Bilbo ♦ Thorin ♦ Gandalf ♦ Elrond ♦ Beorn ♦ Bard ♦ Smaug ♦ Roac ♦ The dwarves ♦ Gollum ♦ The Great Goblin ♦ Lord of the Eagles ♦ The trolls ♦ The Elvenking ♦ The woof-elves ♦ The thrush ♦ Wargs Part 2. Places and Concepts. Multiple choice. ♦ The Arkenstone ♦ Durin's Day ♦ Description of a typical Baggins ♦ What it means to be "Tookish" ♦ The dwarves' response to Bilbo's participation ♦ Bilbo's emotional response following the unexpected party ♦ The conflict involving the trolls ♦ Beorn's concerns ♦ Bilbo's sword ♦ The Orcrist ♦ The Last Homely House ♦ The enchanted stream ♦ Thorin and the Elvenking's stubbornness ♦ Bilbo's rescue of the adventurers ♦ Bilbo's escape plan flaw ♦ Lake-town's reaction to the presence of the adventurers ♦ The mountain's secret door ♦ A dragon's traits Part 3. Vocabulary. Matching. 12 questions. ♦ Audacious ♦ Smote ♦ Obstinately ♦ Flummoxed ♦ Venerable ♦ Plight ♦ Forbear ♦ Toothsome ♦ Haste ♦ Mirth ♦ Parley ♦ Eyrie Part 4. Quote Association. Matching. Identify the speaker. 12 quotes. ♦ “If I say he is a Burglar, a Burglar he is, or will be when the time comes.” ♦ “Moon letters are rune letters, but you cannot see them.” ♦ “He’s found it, yes he must have. My birthday present.” ♦ “Well, it is the first time that even a mouse has crept along carefully and quietly under my very nose and not been spotted.” ♦ “…the bacon knows that it will get back in the pan sooner or later, and it is to be hoped we shan’t.” ♦ “The day will come when they will perish and I will go back!” ♦ “I’m going to lie here and sleep and dream of food, if I can’t get it any other way.” ♦ “No treasure will come back through Mirkwood without my having something to say in the matter.” ♦ And more Part 5. Quote Analysis. Identify the speaker, recipient(s) of the statement, and the context. 3 quotes. ♦ “May the wind under your wings bear you where the sun sails and the moon walks.” ♦ “Come along back to your nice cells, and I will lock you all in again, and you can sit there comfortably and think of a better plan.” ♦ “Since I leave now all gold and silver, and go where it is of little worth, I wish to part in friendship from you…” Part 6. Essays. Respond to 2 prompts. ♦ Dynamic character ♦ Heroism ♦ Theme
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High School Grammar Packets Bundle (Commas, Verb Tense, Active Voice, & More)

High School Grammar Packets Bundle (Commas, Verb Tense, Active Voice, & More)

This collection of grammar packets is a helpful resource for teaching composition at the high school level. Concepts covered include applying comma and semicolon rules, navigating verb tenses, writing in the active voice, and more. Answer keys for each resource are provided. Grammar Packet: Using Commas, Conjunctions, and Semicolons. This grammar packet covers 12 essential rules for using commas, semicolons, and conjunctions correctly. Students apply their understanding of these rules by making revisions to several sentences. This resource is recommended for high school students enrolled in composition classes emphasizing foundational writing skills. An answer key is included. Grammar Packet: Applying Verb Tenses (Emphasis on Irregular Verbs). This grammar packet includes explanations and examples of verbs in their principal parts with an emphasis on irregular verbs. Practices involve filling in blanks to correctly apply verb tenses. This resource is recommended for middle school students preparing for high school composition classes, as well as for high school students enrolled in composition courses emphasizing foundational writing skills. An answer key is included. Grammar Packet: Writing Numerals and Using Active Voice. This grammar packet covers 16 rules for writing numerals according to standard conventions. It also helps students practice using active voice (and word economy) by revising sentences written in passive voice. This resource is recommended for high school students enrolled in composition classes emphasizing foundational writing skills. An answer key is included. Grammar Packet: Resolving Common Word Usage Errors. This grammar-based resource covers 30 common word usage errors in high school writing and speaking. It is designed to help students recognize and apply standard usage principles in formal communications. This resource is recommended for high school students enrolled in composition classes emphasizing foundational writing skills. An answer key is included. Usage principles covered include the following: ♦ accept vs. except ♦ advice vs. advise ♦ affect vs. effect ♦ all ready vs. already ♦ all right vs. alright ♦ all together vs. altogether ♦ allusion vs. illusion ♦ among vs. between ♦ amount vs. number ♦ anyway vs. anyways ♦ being as/that vs. since ♦ beside vs. besides ♦ could/would/should have vs. could/would/should of ♦ couldn’t care less vs. could care less ♦ each other vs. one another ♦ enthusiastic vs. enthused ♦ farther vs. fewer ♦ fewer vs. less ♦ good vs. well ♦ imply vs. infer ♦ in vs. into ♦ its vs. it’s ♦ lay vs. lie ♦ lose vs. loose ♦ principal vs. principle ♦ regardless vs. irregardless ♦ supposedly vs. supposably ♦ than vs. then ♦ who vs. whom ♦ whose vs. who’s
inquiringmind44
High School Grammar Packet: Resolving Common Word Usage Errors

High School Grammar Packet: Resolving Common Word Usage Errors

This grammar-based resource covers 30 common word usage errors in high school writing and speaking. It is designed to help students recognize and apply standard usage principles in formal communications. This resource is recommended for high school students enrolled in composition classes emphasizing foundational writing skills. An answer key is included. Usage principles covered include the following: ♦ accept vs. except ♦ advice vs. advise ♦ affect vs. effect ♦ all ready vs. already ♦ all right vs. alright ♦ all together vs. altogether ♦ allusion vs. illusion ♦ among vs. between ♦ amount vs. number ♦ anyway vs. anyways ♦ being as/that vs. since ♦ beside vs. besides ♦ could/would/should have vs. could/would/should of ♦ couldn’t care less vs. could care less ♦ each other vs. one another ♦ enthusiastic vs. enthused ♦ farther vs. fewer ♦ fewer vs. less ♦ good vs. well ♦ imply vs. infer ♦ in vs. into ♦ its vs. it’s ♦ lay vs. lie ♦ lose vs. loose ♦ principal vs. principle ♦ regardless vs. irregardless ♦ supposedly vs. supposably ♦ than vs. then ♦ who vs. whom ♦ whose vs. who’s
inquiringmind44
A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah: Chapters 1-9 Quiz & Key

A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah: Chapters 1-9 Quiz & Key

This 10-question constructed response quiz measures comprehension, encourages thoughtful discussion, and holds students accountable for reading A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah (chapters 1-9). The resource is editable, and an answer key is provided. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ An imminent threat ♦ Rap music’s role in helping Ishmael learn English ♦ The reason for an early dismissal from school ♦ Devastating sights to behold in the village of Kabati ♦ Siaka Steven’s return to power ♦ Ishmael’s nightmares ♦ Evidence of the rebels’ desire to be welcomed ♦ An attack in Kamator ♦ A painful punishment exacted upon the boys ♦ The significance of cassette tapes falling out of the boys’ pockets
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A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah - Test & Key

A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah - Test & Key

This summative assessment measures reading comprehension of A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah. It also assesses the ability to write claims in an analysis of the text and its characters using valid reasoning and sufficient evidence. An answer key is included, as well as a holistic rubric for evaluating the essay portion of the test. For a breakdown of each individual section of the test, continue reading. Part 1 - Character Identification & Plot. Twenty-seven multiple choice questions. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ Ishmael Beah ♦ Junior ♦ Laura Simms ♦ Leslie ♦ Esther ♦ Mohamed ♦ Saidu ♦ Uncle Tommy ♦ Lieutenant Jabati ♦ Alhaji ♦ Mambu ♦ Siaka Stevens ♦ Ngor Gasemu ♦ Poppay ♦ UNICEF ♦ RUF ♦ CAW Part 2 - True/False. Nine true/false questions. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ Siaka Stevens’ return to power ♦ Ishmael’s education ♦ Ishmael’s fighting background ♦ Ishmael’s history with and interest in music ♦ Ishmael’s treatment of Esther ♦ UNICEF’s mistake pairing army boys and rebel boys Part 3 - Short Answer. Seven constructed response questions. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ The boys’ separation from their families ♦ What led to the boys becoming barefoot ♦ Ishmael’s anger toward Gasemu ♦ The cause of Saidu’s apparent depression ♦ What helped Ishmael learn English ♦ How movies motivated the boys ♦ What motivated Ishmael Beah to write the novel Part 4 - Essay. One question. A holistic rubric modeled after the 6 Traits + 1 Writing Model is included. Question pertains to the following: ♦ Determining which character demonstrates the trait of perseverance ♦ Identifying representative situations (textual evidence) that support claims ♦ Analyzing the character’s motivation to overcome his/her challenges ♦ Evaluating whether the character is better or worse for enduring their obstacles.
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The Grapes of Wrath Test & Key

The Grapes of Wrath Test & Key

This editable unit test on The Grapes of Wrath by John Steinbeck measures reading comprehension and features a range of basic recall questions to higher order thinking questions. Question types include matching, multiple choice, true/false, and short answer. The test is 7 pages in length and offers 52 questions. An answer key is provided. For a breakdown of content, read on:
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A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah: Chapters 15-16 Quiz & Key

A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah: Chapters 15-16 Quiz & Key

This 12-question constructed response quiz measures comprehension, encourages thoughtful discussion, and holds students accountable for reading A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah (chapters 15-16). The resource is editable, and an answer key is provided. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ A contest involving the slaughter of POWs ♦ A life-changing opportunity brought on by UNICEF ♦ A fundamental misunderstanding of how army boys and rebels would interact with in a different environment ♦ Benin Home, a rehabilitation center ♦ The cause of the boys’ violent behaviors ♦ A visit with a nurse ♦ Ishmael’s second hospitalization in a single day ♦ The boys’ actions involving books ♦ The boys’ motivation to attend school regularly ♦ A nightmarish recollection of forcing prisoners to dig their own graves before being buried alive ♦ Ishmael’s reaction to injury
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A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah: Chapters 17-21 Quiz & Key

A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah: Chapters 17-21 Quiz & Key

This 13-question constructed response quiz measures comprehension, encourages thoughtful discussion, and holds students accountable for reading A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah (chapters 17-21). The resource is editable, and an answer key is provided. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ Nurse Esther’s nurturing demeanor and its effect on Ishmael ♦ Ishmael’s recollection of having life-threatening injuries and his reaction ♦ The dream Ishmael tells Esther about ♦ Uncle Tommy’s effect on Ishmael ♦ Mambu’s tragic circumstances ♦ The United Nations Conference in New York City ♦ Ishmael’s difficulty in acquiring a passport and Visa ♦ Laura Simms’ background ♦ The radio announcement ♦ The death of Uncle Tommy ♦ Ishmael’s escape ♦ The novel’s resolution
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A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah: Chapters 10-14 Quiz & Key

A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah: Chapters 10-14 Quiz & Key

This 9-question constructed response quiz measures comprehension, encourages thoughtful discussion, and holds students accountable for reading A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah (chapters 10-14). The resource is editable, and an answer key is provided. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ The psychological impact of witnessing violent, violating acts ♦ An unlikely source of food ♦ The cause of Saidu’s “fainting” spell ♦ A discovery about the boys’ families ♦ Expository information on Ngor Gasemu ♦ The cause of Ishmael’s anger toward Ngor Gasemu ♦ Techniques used by authority figures to convince boys to join the army ♦ How Ishmael rationalizes killing a man during his first experience on the front lines ♦ The influence of drugs and movies on boy soldiers
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A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah - Assessment Bundle (Set of 4 Quizzes, Unit Test & Keys)

A Long Way Gone by Ishmael Beah - Assessment Bundle (Set of 4 Quizzes, Unit Test & Keys)

This bundle of four constructed response quizzes measures comprehension, encourages thoughtful discussion, and holds students accountable for reading A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah. Each individual resource is editable and includes an answer key. The breakdown of each assessment follows. Chapters 1-9. This is a 10-question constructed response quiz. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ An imminent threat ♦ Rap music’s role in helping Ishmael learn English ♦ The reason for an early dismissal from school ♦ Devastating sights to behold in the village of Kabati ♦ Siaka Steven’s return to power ♦ Ishmael’s nightmares ♦ Evidence of the rebels’ desire to be welcomed ♦ An attack in Kamator ♦ A painful punishment exacted upon the boys ♦ The significance of cassette tapes falling out of the boys’ pockets Chapters 10-14. This is a 9-question constructed response quiz. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ The psychological impact of witnessing violent, violating acts ♦ An unlikely source of food ♦ The cause of Saidu’s “fainting” spell ♦ A discovery about the boys’ families ♦ Expository information on Ngor Gasemu ♦ The cause of Ishmael’s anger toward Ngor Gasemu ♦ Techniques used by authority figures to convince boys to join the army ♦ How Ishmael rationalizes killing a man during his first experience on the front lines ♦ The influence of drugs and movies on boy soldiers Chapters 15-16. This is a 12-question constructed response quiz. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ A contest involving the slaughter of POWs ♦ A life-changing opportunity brought on by UNICEF ♦ A fundamental misunderstanding of how army boys and rebels would interact with in a different environment ♦ Benin Home, a rehabilitation center ♦ The cause of the boys’ violent behaviors ♦ A visit with a nurse ♦ Ishmael’s second hospitalization in a single day ♦ The boys’ actions involving books ♦ The boys’ motivation to attend school regularly ♦ A nightmarish recollection of forcing prisoners to dig their own graves before being buried alive ♦ Ishmael’s reaction to injury Chapters 17-21. This is a 13-question constructed response quiz. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ Nurse Esther’s nurturing demeanor and its effect on Ishmael ♦ Ishmael’s recollection of having life-threatening injuries and his reaction ♦ The dream Ishmael tells Esther about ♦ Uncle Tommy’s effect on Ishmael ♦ Mambu’s tragic circumstances ♦ The United Nations Conference in New York City ♦ Ishmael’s difficulty in acquiring a passport and Visa ♦ Laura Simms’ background ♦ The radio announcement ♦ The death of Uncle Tommy ♦ Ishmael’s escape ♦ The novel’s resolution The summative unit assessment measures reading comprehension of A Long Way Gone: Memoirs of a Boy Soldier by Ishmael Beah. It also assesses the ability to write claims in an analysis of the text and its characters using valid reasoning and sufficient evidence. An answer key is included, as well as a holistic rubric for evaluating the essay portion of the test. For a breakdown of each individual section of the test, continue reading. Part 1 - Character Identification & Plot. Twenty-seven multiple choice questions. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ Ishmael Beah ♦ Junior ♦ Laura Simms ♦ Leslie ♦ Esther ♦ Mohamed ♦ Saidu ♦ Uncle Tommy ♦ Lieutenant Jabati ♦ Alhaji ♦ Mambu ♦ Siaka Stevens ♦ Ngor Gasemu ♦ Poppay ♦ UNICEF ♦ RUF ♦ CAW Part 2 - True/False. Nine true/false questions. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ Siaka Stevens’ return to power ♦ Ishmael’s education ♦ Ishmael’s fighting background ♦ Ishmael’s history with and interest in music ♦ Ishmael’s treatment of Esther ♦ UNICEF’s mistake pairing army boys and rebel boys Part 3 - Short Answer. Seven constructed response questions. Questions pertain to the following: ♦ The boys’ separation from their families ♦ What led to the boys becoming barefoot ♦ Ishmael’s anger toward Gasemu ♦ The cause of Saidu’s apparent depression ♦ What helped Ishmael learn English ♦ How movies motivated the boys ♦ What motivated Ishmael Beah to write the novel Part 4 - Essay. One question. A holistic rubric modeled after the 6 Traits + 1 Writing Model is included. Question pertains to the following: ♦ Determining which character demonstrates the trait of perseverance ♦ Identifying representative situations (textual evidence) that support claims ♦ Analyzing the character’s motivation to overcome his/her challenges ♦ Evaluating whether the character is better or worse for enduring their obstacles.
inquiringmind44
High School Grammar Packet: Writing Numerals and Using Active Voice

High School Grammar Packet: Writing Numerals and Using Active Voice

This grammar packet covers 16 rules for writing numerals according to standard conventions. It also helps students practice using active voice (and word economy) by revising sentences written in passive voice. This resource is recommended for high school students enrolled in composition classes emphasizing foundational writing skills.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 16; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 16; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the sixteenth chapter of *To Kill a Mockingbird *by Harper Lee. Featuring 10 multiple choice questions, this editable resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Drawing inferences: "The full meaning of the night’s events hit me and I began crying. Jem was awfully nice about it: for once he didn’t remind me that people nearly nine years old didn’t do things like that." ♦ Applying literary terminology (metaphor): "Atticus watched in frank admiration; Aunt Alexandra sipped coffee and radiated waves of disapproval." ♦ Reading closely: "Children who slipped out at night were a disgrace to the family." ♦ Inferring meaning: "You know how they talk among themselves. Everything that happens in this town’s out to the Quarters before sundown." ♦ Paraphrasing Atticus’s feelings toward Mr. Cunningham after the mob incident. ♦ Understanding literary terminology (hyperbole): "‘It’s all over town this morning,’ [Dill] announced, 'all about how we held off a hundred folks with our bare hands…" ♦ Defining vocabulary in context: formidable. ♦ Reading closely: Why Maudie chooses not to attend the trial. ♦ Identifying accurate statements: Dolphus Raymond’s banishment from traditional society and condemnation to an uneasy life among a minority class. ♦ Discerning the significance of the children’s placement in the balcony among the African American community. This resource aligns well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 17; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 17; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the seventeenth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 6 multiple choice questions and 1 constructed response question, this editable resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Discerning meaning: “Every town the size of Maycomb had families like the Ewells. No economic fluctuations changed their status—people like the Ewells lived as guests of the county in prosperity as well as in the depths of a depression.” ♦ Discerning meaning: “The varmints had a lean time of it, for the Ewells gave the dump a thorough gleaning every day…” ♦ Understanding characters’ feelings (Jem and Scout): “We acquired no traumas from watching our father win or lose…” ♦ Understanding Bob Ewell’s testimony: "I’ve asked this county for fifteen years to clean out that nest down yonder, they’re dangerous to live around ‘sides devaluin’ my property—”; “Mr. Ewell was endearing himself to his fellow citizens.” ♦ Interpreting metaphorical expressions: Bob is described by the narrator as “a red little rooster.” ♦ Interpreting metaphorical expressions: “It seemed to me that [Atticus had] gone frog-sticking without a light.” ♦ Applying literary devices and articulating rationale: verbal irony. This resource aligns well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 21; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 21; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the twenty-first chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 7 multiple choice questions, this editable resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Analyzing character: assessing Atticus’s feelings about his children’s attendance. ♦ Inferring meaning in a quote: Jem’s lack of awareness of institutionalized racism. ♦ Defining vocabulary in context: relenting. ♦ Analyzing character: Atticus’s belief that Tom will be found guilty despite the evidence. ♦ Determining character intent: Reverend Sykes wants to temper Jem’s expectations and prepare him for harsh realities. ♦ Locating textual support: “When [the clock] bonged eleven times I was past feeling: tired from fighting sleep, I allowed myself a short nap against Reverend Sykes’s comfortable arm and shoulder.” ♦ Determining character intent: Reverend Sykes wants Scout to demonstrate respect for Atticus’s efforts. This resource aligns well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource may prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 10; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 10; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the tenth chapter of *To Kill a Mockingbird *by Harper Lee. Featuring 8 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Analyzing character: Assessing Scout’s feelings toward her father. ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: Rudiments. ♦ Paraphrasing Maudie’s explanation why "it’s a sin to kill a mockingbird." ♦ Deriving meaning: What Scout means when she refers to a "generous target." ♦ Understanding character motivation: Why Scout wished her "father was a devil from hell." ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: Erratically. ♦ Making logical inferences. ♦ Paraphrasing Maudie’s explanation for why Atticus does not like guns. This resource aligns well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheets Bundle (Set of 15)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheets Bundle (Set of 15)

This bundle of 15 close reading exercises, which features more than 125 higher order thinking questions, encourages purposeful reading and deeper comprehension of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. These resources align well to Adolescent Literacy Project teaching principles. I recommend using these worksheets as the basis for small-group discussions, letting students discuss, debate, and support their reasoning for answer choices. In the role of facilitator, I observe my students becoming more consistently engaged with the novel and taking greater ownership of their learning. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to comprehend challenging texts, close reading resources may help students prepare for ACT-style questioning.
inquiringmind44
To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 1; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 1; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the first chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 9 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Simon Finch’s history and how he "regarded with impotent fury the disturbance between the North and the South" ♦ Atticus Finch’s history and how he broke "the tradition of living on the land" ♦ Atticus Finch’s first two clients and their ignorance ♦ The Haverfords’ having "dispatching Maycomb’s leading blacksmith in a misunderstanding arising from the alleged wrongful detention of a mare" ♦ The narrator’s intent when describing Calpurnia’s hand as "wide as a bed slat and twice as hard" ♦ An interpretation of the following phrase: "inhabited by an unknown entity the mere description of whom was enough to make us behave for days on end" ♦ Defining and interpreting vocabulary and phrasing in context (‘predilection’ and ‘a neighborhood scold’) ♦ Atticus’s use of metaphor to communicate how there are several ways to break a person down to the point of isolation from the outside world In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 2; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 2; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the second chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 8 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Drawing logical inferences (supporting the notion that Miss Caroline is out of touch with the lives of her students) ♦ The significance of Miss Caroline’s being from Winston County, Alabama ♦ What motivates Miss Caroline to insist that Atticus not teach Scout how to read ♦ Drawing logical inferences (supporting the notion that Walter Cunningham is embarrassed to be the center of attention) ♦ Defining vocabulary in context (dreary) ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expression (tail in a crack) ♦ Character’s intent (Atticus’s sincere belief that the Cunningham family will eventually repay him for his services) In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 4; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 4; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the fourth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 13 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Inferring meaning: “[A]s I inched sluggishly along the treadmill of the Maycomb County school system, I could not help receiving the impression that I was being cheated out of something." ♦ Vocabulary in context: Tyranny. ♦ Discerning the significance of a passage: "Rather than risk a tangle with Calpurnia, I did as Jem told me. For some reason, my first year of school had wrought a great change in our relationship. Calpurnia’s tyranny, unfairness, and meddling in my business had faded to gentle grumblings of general disapproval. On my part, I went to much trouble, sometimes, not to provoke her." ♦ Applying the concept of irony to a passage: “It was the kind of box wedding rings came in, purple velvet with a minute catch. Jem flicked open the tiny catch. Inside were two scrubbed and polished pennies, one on top of the other.” ♦ Interpreting meaning: “Finders were keepers unless title was proven.” ♦ Interpreting meaning: “I did not realize that Jem was offended by my contradicting him on Hot Steams, and that he was patiently awaiting an opportunity to reward me.” ♦ Drawing inferences: "Jem looked at me furiously, could not decline, ran down the sidewalk, treaded water at the gate, then dashed in and retrieved the tire." ♦ Interpreting metaphor: "Jem’s head at times was transparent." ♦ Literary devices: Allusion. ♦ Drawing inferences: "we did not see Atticus standing on the sidewalk looking at us, slapping a rolled magazine against his knee." ♦ Literary devices: Personification. ♦ Vocabulary in context: Evasion. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 5; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 5; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the fifth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 9 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key with rationale for each answer and covers the following: ♦ Inferring meaning and significance: “[Miss Maudie] called us by all our names, and when she grinned she revealed two minute gold prongs clipped to her eyeteeth. When I admired them and hoped I would have some eventually, she said ‘Look here.’ With a click of her tongue she thrust out her bridgework, a gesture of cordiality that cemented our friendship.” ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expressions: “was admitted to our confidence." ♦ Interpreting meaning: “Did you know some of ‘em came out of the woods one Saturday and passed by this place and told me me and my flowers were going to hell?” ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expressions: “had an acid tongue in her head.” ♦ Interpreting meaning: “There are just some kind of men who—who’re so busy worrying about the next world they’ve never learned to live in this one, and you can look down the street and see the results.” ♦ Supporting a claim regarding the origin of Maudie’s interest in gardening using textual evidence: “Her father was a neighboring landowner. His name was Dr. Frank Buford. He was a medicine man, but he stayed poor because he was obsessed with his plants and the earth.” ♦ Applying literary terminology: hyperbole. ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: inquisitive. ♦ Inferring a character’s intent: Atticus. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 6; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 6; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the sixth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 11 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Deriving meaning: “Making change in the collection plate every Sunday.” ♦ Applying literary devices: Dialect. ♦ Deriving meaning: "A closer inspection revealed an arc of water descending from the leaves and splashing in the yellow circle of the street light, some ten feet from source to earth, it seemed to us." ♦ Defining vocabulary in context: Prowess. ♦ Understanding what Scout means when she describes herself as "untalented in this area." ♦ Applying literary terminology: Dramatic irony. ♦ Interpreting idiomatic expressions: "Hatching one." ♦ Interpreting meaning: “Matches were dangerous, but cards were fatal.” ♦ Deriving meaning: “It was then, I suppose, that Jem and I first began to part company.” ♦ Applying literary devices: Simile. ♦ Drawing logical inferences: “[Jem] lay down, and for a while I heard his cot trembling.” In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 8; ACT Prep)

To Kill a Mockingbird Close Reading Worksheet (Chapter 8; ACT Prep)

Helping students comprehend what they read is an essential skill that promotes success in terms of academics and career readiness. This close reading exercise helps students derive deeper meaning from the eighth chapter of To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee. Featuring 8 multiple choice questions, this resource includes an answer key and covers the following: ♦ Accurately paraphrasing Atticus’s remarks: “Son, I can’t tell what you’re going to be—an engineer, a lawyer, or a portrait painter. You’ve perpetrated a near libel here in the front yard.” ♦ Understanding vocabulary in context: Touchous. ♦ Drawing logical inferences: “The old fire truck, killed by the cold, was being pushed from town by a crowd of men. When the men attached its hose to a hydrant, the hose burst and water shot up, tinkling down on the pavement.” ♦ Applying literary devices: Simile. ♦ Demonstrating comprehension of plot: "An absolute morphodite." ♦ Inferring meaning: “Do not let this inspire you to further glory” (Atticus to Jem). ♦ Demonstrating comprehension of plot: Why Scout’s “stomach turned to water.” ♦ Applying literary devices: Situational irony. In addition to helping students gain deeper understanding of the material and greater confidence in their ability to read harder texts, this resource was designed to prepare students for ACT-style questioning.
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