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The CREATE Education Project

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CREATE Education provide support to 3D printing in education, including CPD, resources and a free 3D printer loan scheme. We also host a STEAM educator community allowing educators to connect, share, collaborate and support each other at www.connect.createeducation.com

CREATE Education provide support to 3D printing in education, including CPD, resources and a free 3D printer loan scheme. We also host a STEAM educator community allowing educators to connect, share, collaborate and support each other at www.connect.createeducation.com
3D Printing in the New Design and Technology GCSE
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3D Printing in the New Design and Technology GCSE

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The CREATE Education Project has put together this guide to how 3D printing technology can be utilised to help schools and students meet the aims, objectives and subject content of the new GCSE Curriculum and Exam Board Specifications. 3D printing can provide a vehicle for covering many elements of the new GCSE specifications, so in this guide we have addressed each relevant part of the curriculum to provide ideas, links and resources to help teachers to cover these areas from a 3D printing perspective. The guide includes: Project, lesson and activity ideas Links to over a dozen FREE downloadable projects and resources Links to real industrial case studies and examples to use with students Curriculum references/links If you don’t have access to a 3D printer, you can borrow one to run a project in school using the free CREATE Education loan scheme, learn more at www.createeducation.com/loan-scheme
3D Printing Classroom Management Guide
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3D Printing Classroom Management Guide

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Managing 3D printing in school can be challenging, unless you have a bank of several 3D printers, which few schools are fortunate to own. 3D printing is a multi-step process requiring students to produce several different file types. The manufacturing process is also relatively slow, which can lead to bottlenecks waiting to use the printer(s). In addition to this the 3D printer needs “looking after”, filament will need changing, it will need maintenance and so on. To help address some of these challenges, the CREATE Education Project have developed this handy 3D Printing Classroom Management guide. It is packed with practical tips drawn from our own extensive experience of working with schools. Ideas have also been contributed by our experienced and knowledgeable user community. The guide includes tips on: 3D Project Planning File Management Print Management Filament Management Budgeting for 3D Printing 3D Printer Maintenance The guide contains lots of useful links to specific further information and resources. If you have the PDF open on your computer or device, you can click on the links directly from the PDF to open the resources. You can download more free 3D printing resources from www.createeducation.com If you don’t have access to a 3D printer, you can borrow one to run a project in school using the free CREATE Education loan scheme, learn more at www.createeducation.com/loan-scheme
3D Printing Knowledge & Skills Progression Framework
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3D Printing Knowledge & Skills Progression Framework

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This knowledge and skills progression framework has been developed to help with planning projects and schemes of work that incorporate 3D printing as it provides a structured list of knowledge and skills providing a complete progression route through the topic. The framework is aimed at schools and colleges teaching 3D printing to students ages 11 and over who are new to 3D printing. The knowledge and skills have been split into three strands, these are: Additive Manufacturing & 3D Printing Processes Designing for 3D Printing and Slicing Models 3D Modelling Within these three strands, the knowledge and skills have been organised into three levels (Foundation, Intermediate and Advanced) to allow for structure and progression. The foundation level is suitable for students in KS3 Year 7 and upwards, intermediate level for Yr9 and upwards and advanced level for Yr10 and upwards. For each level and strand a series of discrete knowledge and skills have been listed, these can be used to inform planning of schemes of work and discrete lessons, devising assessment opportunities and for embedding into existing or new curriculum and assessment frameworks. Some of the foundation knowledge and skills descriptors are suitable to be delivered to students in KS2, however we strongly suggest that students develop their 3D modelling skills using simple, age appropriate CAD software and slicing is restricted to students in upper KS2 with appropriate experience and skills. If you don’t have access to a 3D printer, you can borrow one to run a project in school using the free CREATE Education loan scheme, learn more at www.createeducation.com/loan-scheme
3D Printing in the Primary Curriculum Guide
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3D Printing in the Primary Curriculum Guide

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Developing 3D design and printing skills can begin in the Primary school. Schools can embed 3D printing across the school at all levels and in multiple subject areas, using it as a tool to increase pupil engagement and attainment. This guide has been developed by The CREATE Education Project to provide Primary Schools with an overview of how 3D printing can be utilised within a Primary school setting across all ages, levels and curriculum areas, including: > Getting started. > 3D printing skills progression – a complete progression route with suggested projects for each stage. This takes pupils from total beginners designing in 2D through to them being able to design their own 3D models. The progression route can be applied from Reception upwards. > 3D printing across the curriculum – details, examples and ideas for how 3D printing can be used across the curriculum with a dedicated section for every Primary subject area as well as cross-curricular and business enterprise ideas. > Lots of project ideas and links to further resources and case studies. > Further support and professional development. This is an introductory resource to allow you explore the opportunities for 3D printing and to develop a plan for introducing 3D printing in the classroom across all ages and subjects in order to maximise the opportunities for 3D printing in school and develop pupils skills. You can access more free resources at www.createeducation.com If you don’t have access to a 3D printer, you can borrow one to run a project in school using the free CREATE Education loan scheme, learn more at www.createeducation.com/loan-scheme
3D Printing in the Computing Curriculum
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3D Printing in the Computing Curriculum

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3D printing provides great potential for enhancing teaching and learning throughout the computing curriculum. Access to 3D printing technology can provide the following benefits: Assisting students in developing many computational thinking skills. Developing creativity and skills in using a variety of software and hardware. Allowing students to code and then 3D print their own artifacts. Enabling physical computing by combining 3D printing with programmable devices, providing opportunities for students to code and develop meaningful products. This guide covers some of the potential uses and applications of 3D printing technology in the computing curriculum and provides information, links to free project resources and activity ideas to get you started. You can access more free resources at www.createeducation.com If you don’t have access to a 3D printer, you can borrow one to run a project in school using the free CREATE Education loan scheme, learn more at www.createeducation.com/loan-scheme
3D Printing the Weather Project
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3D Printing the Weather Project

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In this weather and climate project students create 3D models using data from the Central England Temperature Record and then use the models to explore temperature and climate change. The Central England Temperature (CET) data record, the longest instrument record of temperature in the world, is held by the Met Office. This data includes the average monthly temperature each month from January 1659 to December 2018. This project allows students to create 3D models that represent 10 years of temperature data. These can be consecutive years or consist of any other year grouping. In addition to this the models have been designed to interlink, so a group of students can create a series of models to represent larger time frames. Once the 3D models have been created and 3D printed, you will have a tactile resource that you can use in multiple ways in your classroom to visualise and study the weather and climate. Further resources and video tutorials to support this project can be downloaded at www.createeducation.com/3d-printing-the-weather This project has been developed by CREATE Education in Partnership with the Royal Meteorological Society. You can borrow a 3D printer free of charge for up to 4 weeks to run this project, see www.createeducation.com/loan-scheme